Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: One Planet Forth Valley online discussion

One Planet Forth Valley is a Scottish Government, Climate Challenge Fund project led by the Central Scotland Regional Equality Council based in Falkirk. 

We would like to invite you to come along to our free online discussion next week the 17th of September between 3pm and 4pm to discuss the topic, ‘Net Zero’ and how Scotland can get there!

We hope to see you there and hear your views on this. Please let us know if you would like to be sent the zoom link to access the workshop!

For more information, please contact Christine, project officer, One Planet Forth Valley

You can find out more on the following websites and social media:

The post Opportunity: One Planet Forth Valley online discussion appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Take One Action Film Festival 2020

Take One Action nurtures communal exploration of the stories, ideas and questions at the heart of positive social change. Join us online from 16-27 September 2020.

2020 has been a tumultuous year… but we’re pleased to be able to provide a tiny wee bit of stability: Take One Action’s annual film festival returns from 16-27 September. Taking place ONLINE for the first time in its history, the UK’s leading global change film festival offers 12 days of the most inspiring, challenging and urgent international cinema exploring social and environmental justice – all available from a sofa (very) near you.

All films are accessible from anywhere in the UK. Films can be booked on a “pay-what-you-can” basis, while all live Q&As and workshops are free to attend. Check out the full programme the Take One Action website.

Our raison d’être is to bring people together to encourage communal exploration of the stories, ideas and questions at the heart of positive social change. Though current circumstances mean that the communal spirit of our events will need to be summoned differently, we look forward to re-connecting with audiences across Scotland – and beyond – this September. We’re committed to responding to audiences’ appetite for challenging conversations – and to sparking people on their journey into action.

Our Shared Planet strand includes films that interrogate current environmental realities from a climate justice perspective:

Choose ‘Shared Planet’ from the ‘Festival Strand’ on the TOAFF website.

We’re delighted to be welcoming inspiring campaigners to the free, live Q&As and workshop that complement our film programme – and hope you’ll be able to join us.

Image supplied by Take One Action Film Festival

The post Take One Action Film Festival 2020 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Twist’s shift #1

Twist’s Shift is a new strand of semi-blog, less formal and structured than Ben’s Strategy Blogs, more a rag-bag of thoughts and experiences from the last wee while. 

Those of you who subscribed to the Twist List in the past may recognise the style. This is the first edition, as it were, and we’ll see how it develops. I’ll try to make sure there is something each time for readers from both the arts/cultural end of things and the climate change side, and it perhaps aims to bring these ‘two cultures’ together on an irregular basis. 

Talks and events

I seem to have been giving lots of talks and facilitating events while in lockdown – online, obviously, which has been interesting. At Creative Carbon Scotland we have noticed that meetups for our Green Arts Initiative(for people in cultural organisations) and Green Teases (for people from both the cultural and climate change worlds, to facilitate collaboration and new connections) have been attracting more people and from further afield than our in-the-flesh ones. This is true also of other organisations’ events that I have been involved in. 

I chaired a Public Sector Client Forum event about Designing for a Changing Climate for Architecture & Design Scotland – videos and resources available via the link. Normally these would attract an audience of 40-50 people, but A&DS had over 130 attendees from all over the country and it was a terrific discussion. It brought together unlikely pairings such as Dr Alette Willis, a storyteller and academic who argues that ‘we live in a soup of stories’, which help us shape our lives, how we think and behave, with Clive Bowman, the Circular Economy Manager from Zero Waste Scotland. I’d imagined he’d want to talk about re-using materials in the context of the built environment, but he took the opportunity that Alette’s angle presented to focus on the values behind the very concept of a circular economy. We had a great conversation, with lots of input from the audience. 

Alette Willis turned up at an equally well attended Cross Party Group on Culture to which I contributed at the Scottish Parliament (or rather, not there at all). I had based my talk around Alette’s ‘soup of stories’, so I was a bit nervous to see her in the virtual audience (luckily she was happy with my use of her idea!). My argument was that if we’re going to transition to a fairer, better, zero-carbon future that is adapted to a changed climate, we need to live by different stories to those we live by today. And, if you consider the counterfactual, that is going to be very difficult if the cultural institutions and outputs that help shape our stories are promulgating high-consumption, me-focused lifestyles that promote inequality and imply high carbon emissions. By way of examples I pointed of course to Hollywood, which churns out stories set within very high-carbon lifestyles; but also to a great chunk of Scottish cultural output that has, in the past at least, set great store by Scotland’s history of coal mining, shipbuilding and heavy, carbon-intensive industry. We need to find new stories that shape a different sort of ambition and future and that don’t laud those who live by carbon. Kit England from Climate Ready Clyde also contributed, talking about our collaboration with that group, which is working on adaptation for the whole of the Clyde basin. Generally, the discussion was very strong, although the shadow of the effect of the lockdown on the cultural sector hung over things.  

More recently I had a long conversation with the theatre critic and general political/cultural commentator Joyce McMillan, which led to this article, which (as with all of Joyce’s writing) is well worth a read. It brings together some topics I have been thinking about and working on for some time – making me sound much more articulate than I was on the phone! 

The internationalisation of the arts

Just before the lockdown I filmed a talk about the internationalisation of the arts for a conference of dance artists, funders and others taking place in Lisbon. In my talk I asked the audience to think about internationalisation in terms of globalisation and what that has meant for the arts and artists. Like manufacturers, globalisation and the development of very cheap travel since the 1970s, and particularly perhaps the increasing role of the EU, have meant that arts organisations and artists can and do sell their services abroad, and they buy in services (shows and talent) from abroad (dance companies are particularly multi-national, perhaps because language isn’t a barrier). Similarly, audiences can travel easily to see work and have come to expect an at-home diet of international companies performing. But globalisation, as the UK’s manufacturing sector has learned, has its downside: the artists and companies are in competition with artists and companies from abroad, some of whom may have lower costs making them cheaper, or may simply seem more attractive to promoters and audiences because they are from elsewhere. Audience members may hop on a flight to foreign parts to see a show with a city-break thrown in, so depriving their local theatre of their company. 

In fact, the Portugal conference was postponed until December because of the pandemic, which of course has highlighted the fragility of our international supply chains when it comes to PPE and ventilators, but also perhaps in terms of artists who might be locked down at home, even if promoters and audiences could welcome them here. And conversely it has highlighted for producers the risk of relying on international touring, projects or teaching to fill a festival programme or balance the books.  

International working

More recently I held a workshop with a group of dance artists and companies from Scotland to discuss international working. Some echoed a comment I had heard previously from theatre companies, that they need to do international touring for financial reasons as much as artistic or social ones. And they agreed with some musicians I have spoken to that they, and their artists, were increasingly unwilling to travel internationally for short engagements: to fly to Colombia for two performances, or even to Germany for one. 

This applies not just to the arts but to academia, business and others. Of course, COVID-19 has taught us to Zoom about and there is much talk of a reduction in business travel. This has its pros and cons. I asked the Scottish dance people to think about how international working breeds inequality; people with caring responsibilities – primarily women – are much less able to travel and so could miss out on career opportunities; people with disabilities are likely to find fast travel to unfamiliar places much harder than those without them. And as Joyce’s article mentions, for me the communal thinking that theatre provides is an important part of society working out how to address difficult and complex questions at the same time as building local communities. Maybe academic conferences and certain sorts of business meetings do the same and I don’t think we’ve yet learned how to think together across the net – I’m not sure it’s actually possible without holding your breath to hear the next devastating line that you know is coming, or laughing with your neighbour at the joke you’ve both just seen and heard. 

The Buried Giant

Finally, earlier on in the lockdown I found myself strangely drawn to re-read Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel The Buried Giant, a book I found unlikely but good when I first read it back in 2015. On the surface it’s an Arthurian tale of knights and dragons and, importantly, a strange mist that seems to make everyone lose their memory of the past. This feels like a bad thing but it turns out to be more complex than that: not everyone is quite what they seem.

I returned to it and I became convinced the book, written in what we didn’t know then was the run up to the Brexit referendum and not long after the Scottish independence referendum, has important things to say about the importance of both remembering and forgetting. We may need to forget some of the battles that have been fought that have divided us and the damage that has been done, we may also need to remember why we fought those battles and why the hurts were caused, possibly in order to forgive them. And we may need to remember what past times were like so we can avoid them in future. As the pandemic has maybe given us an insight into what past lives were like, as the current UK government is (mis-)using myths about the Second World War to achieve its pernicious aims, and as climate change is making us re-examine our present practices, The Buried Giant suddenly seemed to become an important and useful book. I’d encourage you to read it – it isn’t really an Arthurian tale at all.

by Ben Twist, director of Creative Carbon Scotland

The post Twist’s shift #1 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Climate science radio drama writing for 16-25-year-olds

We’re commissioning young creatives to write short audio pieces responding to the climate crisis

IGNITE is a writing development programme for 16-25-year-old creatives, in partnership with RADA and funded by the Royal Society of Chemistry.

We’ll be commissioning six people (or teams of up to 3) to create short radio pieces inspired by the climate crisis over the course of a series of weekend workshops. If selected you’ll take part in zoom workshops with industry mentors, from playwrights and directors to climate activists and scientists. Your plays will then be performed and recorded as podcasts. Writers will receive a fee of £350 for the project.

This opportunity is open to writers, scientists, spoken word artists, comedians, and anyone else who’s interested in applying! Workshops will all take place over zoom, so is open to applicants from anywhere in the UK.

Application deadline is August 14th at 5pm.

Twitter: @IgniteRadioPlay
Instagram: @IgniteRadioPlay

Visit the website for more information about the Ignite radio play

The post Opportunity: Climate science radio drama writing for 16-25-year-olds appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Successful proposal to SGSAH

A joint proposal for an AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Studentship to develop a framework for evaluating environmentally concerned, arts-based community interventions has been successful.

Creative Carbon Scotland, in partnership with the University of Glasgow has successfully applied to the Scottish Graduate School for Arts & Humanities for a fully funded PhD to take forward an interdisciplinary project in “Assessing arts-based interventions for sustainable practice”.

Summary of the project

Tackling the climate crisis requires deep-rooted cultural change at all levels of society. Creative practitioners have begun to devise ways of exploring environmental concerns through arts-based interventions that make common ground with the cultural practices of local communities, but there is as yet no common framework by which we can evaluate the longer-term effectiveness of such interventions. This project will observe two distinct creative interventions, critically reflect upon them as both artistic creations and pedagogical tools within an Energy and Environmental Humanities framework, and develop a portable qualitative framework for the design and assessment of arts-based community interventions.

The AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Studentship will commence in Autumn 2020.

More information about the project and how to apply will be advertised shortly.Is this useful? Share it with someone

The post Successful proposal to SGSAH appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: 87 Beavers: In Memoriam

We will collect 87 artworks to commemorate 87 protected beavers killed under ScotGov license in 2019.

Eighty-seven beavers on Tayside were killed under license by the Scottish Government in 2019: almost one-fifth of Scotland’s beaver population, estimated at 450 animals.
Wise management, or senseless slaughter?

Beavers bring a range of benefits including flood control and their ability to create habitat for many other species through their dam-building activities. Many landowners in other areas of Scotland would love to have beavers on their own rivers and streams, but while the beavers on Tayside, which were reintroduced around 15 years ago after being extinct in Britain for more than three hundred years, gained legally protected status in May 2019, it is still illegal to transport beavers from one area of the country to another.

The proposed art action seeks to commemorate the 87 beavers legally killed in the name of wise management, while persuading the Scottish Government not to kill any more of these beautiful animals, but instead allow them to be legally transported to other areas of the country where they can perform their useful functions.

We are putting out a call for people from all over Scotland and elsewhere to send us artistic representations of the Eurasian beaver: pictures, stuffed toys, papier maché models, sculptures, you name it. This call-out goes as much to professional artists as it does to ordinary members of the public of any age or walk of life. From all the beavers we receive before the deadline, we’ll select 87 to form part of an exhibition which will be put on show in public spaces across Scotland as well as in any gallery space that wants to host it – pandemic conditions permitting, of course.

Visit the 87 beavers website for more information

Deadline: 31st July 2020

The post Opportunity: 87 Beavers: In Memoriam appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Outdoor arts and mixed media commissions

Paid commissions for pop-up outdoor arts and mixed media installations in Renfrewshire.

Renfrewshire Leisure wish to commission a series of innovative pop-up outdoor arts and mixed media installations to be explored from the cycle paths of Renfrewshire between Paisley and Lochwinnoch under social distancing guidelines during Autumn 2020.

The installation experiences will be digitised for online access and then showcased for a longer period at our Cycle Arts Festival in 2021. Our cycle paths have renewed significance in these times of COVID-19 lockdown and we are aiming to celebrate their unique value as open spaces which can be enjoyed by everyone, promoting wellbeing and giving access to green space and wild land.

Funding between £1000 to £5000 is available for artists or organisations submitting innovative visual / mixed media proposals which meet the commission brief.

The outdoor arts / mixed media commissions are for significant outdoor installations that push boundaries of experimentation and capture distinctive narratives of place for Renfrewshire. The work can explore contemporary themes including how we respond to the COVID19 pandemic, reflect on climate adaptation, celebrate cycling and reflect on wellbeing. We are looking for high-quality arts installations with contemporary vision, uniqueness and positive progressive thinking on social change.

To apply please complete the application form, monitoring form and upload your supporting artwork/film /showcase.

For more information contact Renfrewshire Place Partnership, Muriel Ann Macleod, Creative Producer.

Deadline for applications: 5pm, Friday 17th July 2020

The post Opportunity: Outdoor arts and mixed media commissions appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Becoming Earthly – Arts and Ecology Seminar Series

Learning space hosted by artists and thinkers, to reflect and imagine new ways of working.

Becoming Earthly reflects a need to develop a shift in perspective towards care for the thin skin of the earth that is the atmosphere and topsoil on which all life depends. We surprisingly know very little about this skin. It is only a few kilometres in depth and yet all our futures, human and nonhuman, are dependent upon it. In the thinking of Bruno Latour, anthropologist and an influential political philosopher, we have to land, become terrestrial rather than seeking escape to another planet. We are locked into this thin skin of earth.

Latour calls upon the arts to support a process of becoming terrestrial. In a quieter period, he argues, it might make sense for scientists to limit the collaboration of artists to decoration and popularisation. We now need aesthetics to sensitise us to other ways of life. We need artists to sensitise us to the shape of things to come.

However, becoming earthly is disorientating. It fundamentally challenges our beliefs, values and interests. For many artists, the pressure to address the climate emergency in which we are all implicated, can feel like an intrusion into creative practice. It can feel fundamentally at odds with established notions of creative expression. How do we create and develop artistic practice inside the thin skin that is our world, towards a future where both people and the planet will flourish? How can we work as artists and arts organisations in a critically informed way in relation to art and ecology?

The Barn is inviting applications from artists working across all media who wish to participate in an experimental learning space, a thought experiment of sorts. We are interested in practitioners who are open to the challenge that Latour presents in becoming earthly.

It is not necessary to have prior experience of ecology, but essential to be curious about exploring new forms of work through dialogue. We want to encourage applications across all the arts and are particularly keen to encourage those artists working in theatre, dance, performance and new media. We will consider applications from collectives and ensembles, as well as individuals. While we cannot support artists financially, our aim is to create the conditions to open up new innovative forms of practice that respond imaginatively to the challenges we now face.

The Programme

Becoming Earthly has been conceived as a process of thinking through doing, informed by many years of hands-on interventions at the Barn. The process is in itself ecological rather than outcome driven. It will consist of six sessions, two hours in length, delivered via Zoom. Four sessions will be hosted by different thought leaders including internationally renowned artist John Newling, artist researcher Wallace Heim, philosopher Johan Siebers, and anthropologist and feldenkrais practitioner Paolo Maccagno. The introductory session will be led by curator and head of programme at the Barn, Simone Stewart and members of the Becoming Earthly Steering Group. The final session will be a work-in-progress/sharing session. We will present ideas and thinking we have explored during our time together. This could be in the form of a live presentation, readings, or performance. The format for this will be determined collaboratively by the group. To this final session, we will invite key arts and ecological stakeholders’ and funders including Creative Scotland along with the session hosts, with the aim of opening up connections for artists and potential partners.

The Barn has conceived these sessions around the thematic juxtapositions of doubt and pleasure, lament and improvisation, shame and play as provocations or openings into possible connections between ecology and art. These themes lend themselves to performative explorations raising questions such as; What does it mean to perceive our condition as a fragile, temporary state of being, wholly dependent upon the natural systems that surround us? How can these pairings help us to explore the paradigm of ecology not just on the level of concept and structures but though the aesthetic and bodily plains of feelings and perceptions?

Apply for Becoming Earthly; imagining new futures – arts and ecology seminar series

Applications close: Friday 10th July at 5pm.

The post Opportunity: Becoming Earthly – Arts and Ecology Seminar Series appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Green Tease Reflections: #arts4cop26 online planning discussion

29th April 2020: Over 80 participants gathered for an online discussion about arts and culture’s plans for COP26 and how to collectively reorganise and reorient these in light of COVID-19 and the postponement of COP. The event was co-organised with Stop Climate Chaos Scotland and ecoartscotland.

The event opened with introductions from Kat Jones of Stop Climate Chaos Scotland (SCCS) and writer and artist Wallace Heim who offered two contrasting prompts for the ensuing discussion.

Kat gave us the basics about the postponement of COP26 and predicted it would now take place between May and November 2021 in Glasgow, although no date has yet been confirmed. She then discussed SCCS’s plans for COP26, which involve an emphasis on Glasgow’s distinctive history as the ‘Dear Green Place’ and a centre of the early industrial revolution, with Watt’s steam engine for example. SCCS wants to welcome the international community to Glasgow through the city’s unique artistic traditions, music, dance, and ceilidh culture. She stressed the importance of work before and after COP as well as during the brief 2 weeks of the conference itself and working with local communities to create a lasting legacy. She encouraged people to make use of their new Climate Fringe website as a means of publicising work.

Wallace reflected on her own experiences to offer broader thoughts on the role of the arts in crises, the impact of social distancing, and what we can learn from the COVID-19 pandemic. Her complete introductory talk has been published on our website as a guest blog.

First Breakout Session

We separated into smaller groups to introduce ourselves to each other and share our experiences of how planning around COP26 has been negatively impacted by coronavirus and how we might learn from and adapt to the situation to continue making and doing. Some of the thoughts shared back to the main group were:

  • Using this time for networking and skillsharing
  • The importance of platforms and resources for finding out what others are doing and planning
  • Digital media providing an opportunity to reach different people
  • How working with limitations requires finding creative solutions, which is where the arts can excel
  • That longer run-up time provides more opportunities to engage with local communities
Second Breakout Session

We returned to our groups to discuss more specific themes in greater detail. These groups and the main outcomes of their discussions were:

1. What makes for effective collaboration between arts and civil society organisations?

  • It is important to find examples of successful collaborations in the past to learn from
  • The main barriers were not knowing who to work with and how to find funding
  • We need to actively work on reaching out and discovering what others are doing

2. Culture and arts as welcome: global civil society is coming to COP26, what’s our response?

  • Connecting up the global and the local, how to draw connections between visitors and what’s happening here in Glasgow
  • Arts and culture as a means of drawing delegates away from the main site and engaging people on a more human level

3. Bringing the voices of those most affected by climate emergency to COP

  • Being aware of language barriers and the need for work to be multilingual
  • Providing a platform for international and especially indigenous voices in Glasgow, as well as a platform for non-human voices
  • Need to work outside of traditional structures to reach people

4. Arts and protest at COP

  • Importance of protests having a specific goal in mind, raising awareness of specific issues such as climate justice for the global south
  • Using online resources to keep in contact and share information, as well as partnering with others such as Glasgow Life to reach more people
  • Interest in ‘carnivals’ and ‘celebrations’ as an alternative form of protest

5. The role of cultural organisations in increasing awareness that COP is coming to Glasgow and empowering people to get involved

  • COP as punctuation mark in a longer continuity, how to create a legacy
  • COP as a means of mainstreaming ideas and behaviours faster than would be possible otherwise

6. Adapting artistic engagement practices around COP26  in light of coronavirus

  • Being aware of the limitations of digital approaches and inequalities that can result (e.g. slower internet connection in rural areas)
  • Using the time to reflect: potential for arts to play a role in COVID-19 re-framing how people see climate change
  • World soil conference coming to Glasgow in 2022, providing further opportunities for engagement

7. Using art to frame the COP

  • Does art provide the space, and a spectacle in Glasgow? Or is it to open up and question the issues?
  • How can arts and science work together?
  • Fossil fuels and colonialism as issues that the arts can play a role in highlighting
Resources and next steps

All the notes taken during the discussion remain accessible online here.

People in the same breakout groups shared emails so that they could keep in touch. If you are interested in any of the breakout group themes and would like to get involved, please email lewis.coenen-rowe@creativecarbonscotland.com to be put in touch.

Useful resources for hearing about and organising work around COP26 include:

  • The Climate Fringe website has been repurposed as a hub for online events.  If you are planning activity online please post it to the site. Or email tami@stopclimatechaos.scot with your event details.
  • The Arts4COP26 facebook page provides an informal environment to share ideas and plans
  • SCCS are starting a monthly newsletter on events and the climate fringe, hosting, and the Civil Society Hub at COP26
  • The Green Tease network provides opportunities to meet others through online meetups and a database as well as an open call that offers support for events
  • The COP26 civil society coalition Slack working groups, including a dedicated ‘Culture’ channel, are being used for organising

The post Green Tease Reflections: #arts4cop26 online planning discussion appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: QEST Craft Funding – applications opening soon

The Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (QEST) are open for applications on 14th July – 24th August 2020.

The Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (QEST) awards scholarship and apprenticeship funding of up to £18,000 to talented and aspiring craftspeople working in a broad range of skills, from farriery and cheese maturing to jewellery design, silversmithing and sculpture. Our next application round is open 14 July – 24 August 2020 and we are looking for more talented applicants!

QEST celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2020 and since 1990 has awarded over £4.5 million to more than 550 individuals working in over 130 different crafts. We define craft broadly and welcome applications from all areas including rural skills, contemporary craft, conservation, luthiery and much more.

A directory of all our alumni can be seen on our website, along with more details on how to apply. We have two application rounds each year.

The post Opportunity: QEST Craft Funding – applications opening soon appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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