Monthly Archives: August 2012

Funding Natural Heritage Projects

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Scottish Natural Heritage publishes a guide to various funding sources for natural heritage projects – included are schemes that support on the ground action as well as communication and education.  This guide covers EU, Public Sector, Lottery as well as Trusts and Foundations and can be found here.

Also worth checking out is the website of the Environmental Funders Network, and in particular their publication, ‘Where the green grants went.’

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

On time and travel: anticipatory histories at Kilmahew Estate

This post comes to you from Ashden Directory

Benjamin Morris writes: 

Kilmahew Estate, located in Cardross, west of Glasgow, has long been a source of fascination. Despite having been a settlement of some sort for hundreds of years, featuring both a medieval castle and a Victorian stately home, the contemporary lives of the site, first as a Catholic seminary, and then a drug rehabilitation centre, have by comparison been surprisingly brief. St Peter’s Seminary opened in 1966 and lasted two decades; the rehabilitation centre, only half that before closing its doors. Since then, the site has become one of the most popular ruins in Scotland: serving as impromptu musical stage, all-night rave site, unofficial film set, squat encampment, and destination for urban explorers from far and wide.

Explorers, of course, being a broad church. Recently I was privileged to join a group of artists and researchers on a visit to the site, sponsored by the Invisible College and the Royal Geographical Society. It’s important to take the right book on a journey, and fortuitously, tucked away in my bag was a new volume of short essays exploring the futures of historic landscapes: Anticipatory History, edited by Caitlin DeSilvey, Simon Naylor, and Colin Sackett. I couldn’t have brought along a better guidebook.

That said, Anticipatory History is not a guidebook in the traditional sense. Its structure hews more towards a glossary – community-sourced and collectively-written – of terms that are central to ecological thought. Concepts such as adaptation, equilibrium, memory and uncertainty are joined by processes such as erosion, managed realignment, palliative curation, and unfarming. As a conceptual guidebook, it prompted new and novel ways of thinking about this dynamic site, particularly its history of constant change. For this is their aim: ‘History that calls attention to process rather than permanence may therefore help us to be more prepared for future change; to respond thoughtfully and proactively, rather than in a mode of retreat or regret.’

Indeed, it was difficult to cover the grounds of the site without feeling those tensions between pasts and futures, between the curated and the wild, play off one another anew. In the seminary building, for instance, the many different forms of engagement with the site were amply visible. Graffiti of more and less accomplished forms graced the walls; the altar had been broken and desecrated, and rubbish of all sorts lay strewn about, inviting impromptu archaeologies and conjectures as to who had left it there, and why. And, of course, what else would come in time. As the editors note, anticipatory history creates a means of approaching historic landscapes outside the bounds of grand narratives or authorised discourses. Rather, they suggest, it ‘leaves room for expressing the ‘small stories’ and ‘lay knowledges’ that are layered in place, and then linking these to a hoped-for future.’

Over the past half-century, some of those futures have already taken place independent of the human presence. Entering the site via the western approach, younger stands of trees, no more than twenty years old, have sprung up at the exact moment the rehabilitation centre had shut its doors in the early 1990s, and now encroach against the older-growth stands. Anyone looking to rehabilitate the site would have to first map the species onset, then determine how best to bring the site back to a more pristine woodland, keeping in mind, as the editors of the volume claim, that such narratives of purity, often defy the larger narratives of dynamicity that complex landscapes harbor.

An excellent example of these tensions centres on a rhododendron tunnel, considered a key feature of the landscape, indeed, part of its ‘heritage’, despite this species having only been introduced to the UKat the end of the 18th century. Despite their ornamental appeal, their introduction has had unintended consequences. As the entry on the species in the volume observes, ‘Rhododendrons have been able to out-compete many native plants in Britain, and because their leaves are inedible to many animals, their spread has proved difficult to control and they have become reclassified as pests.’

Entering the tunnel today, it is hard not to be impressed at the intricacy and scale of its design, as well as the atmospheric effect of the corridor. In full leaf, the tunnel feels as dark as an abandoned Tube station, or a holloway such as Robert Macfarlane has recently explored. Non-native species or not, one does feel changed by passing through this ‘natural’ architecture, recalling the theologies of transformation that would have been discussed at length around, and within, the grounds, and explaining why one man in the area, the site curator noted, has threatened to chain himself to the bushes should an order for ‘remediation’- clearance – come through.

Given these tensions, the futures for the site over the long-term remain unclear. Currently under consultation by NVA, Kilmahew looks set to become a multidisciplinary arts site encompassing arts research and practice in a variety of fields. The sound artist Michael Gallagher has recently produced a 45-minute audio documentary on the site, layering the voices of former inhabitants together, a compelling departure point for artists and future historians. With so many stories yet to yield from its past, this move would undoubtedly be a productive use of the space, particularly in terms of conservation, amid its ruination, the site still retains the serenity, grace, and seclusion that gave rise to so many of its lives, and any attempt to preserve that is worth the effort.

But thinking of its futures, other questions remain. Given its extensive grounds (133 acres, encompassing woodlands, fields and burns), its diverse constituencies (many of which are transitory and difficult to document or engage) and its architectural histories (a chapel, a castle and a stately home now demolished), the lives of Kilmahew collide and converge in ways that challenge both cohesive collection and swift, dispensable interpretation. The site precludes our understanding, no matter how many times we visit. As it should. For if anticipatory history teaches us anything, it’s that we should move in the direction of, from away from, those limits. The land always has more to tell us. If only we would listen.

A writer and researcher, Benjamin Morris is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh.

“ashdenizen blog and twitter are consistently among the best sources for information and reflection on developments in the field of arts and climate change in the UK” (2020 Network)

ashdenizen is edited by Robert Butler, and is the blog associated with the Ashden Directory, a website focusing on environment and performance.
The Ashden Directory is edited by Robert Butler and Wallace Heim, with associate editor Kellie Gutman. The Directory includes features, interviews, news, a timeline and a database of ecologically – themed productions since 1893 in the United Kingdom. Our own projects include ‘New Metaphors for Sustainability’, ‘Flowers Onstage’ and ‘Six ways to look at climate change and theatre’.

The Directory has been live since 2000.

Go to The Ashden Directory

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AppleThink – Call for Participants

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Creative Camp in Aizpute, Latvia. September 13-15, 2012

AppleThink is a collaboration between The Center for New Media CultureRIXC, Latvian Contemporary Arts Center and Serde from Latvia, as well as Pixelache Helsinki from Finland.

Apples are one of the most harvest-rich, yet under-exploited resources available in Latvia and other post-kolkhoz (collective Soviet farms) countries. The AppleThink event aims to re-approach the ‘habitual’ apples from a variety of different perspectives. The event will bring together an international trans-disciplinary group of participants, who will be sharing their knowledge and experience by approaching apples as a ‘real’ resource of food and energy, as well as as a cultural metaphor for fecundity and wealth.

The AppleThink event will also include presentations and discussions by artists, curators, science researchers, and community activists who will be discussing different survival strategies ranging from the concepts of ‘downshifting’ and ‘withdrawal’, to the approach of ‘resilience’ and a ‘techno-ecologies’ perspective. The camp will end with a local outdoor market together with local farmers, where the artefacts created during the creative camp will be put out for symbolic sale-exhibition.

  • Call for participation: They are inviting participants who are interested in transdisciplinary collaborations, but they also welcome proposals for AppleThink workshops and presentations. Please send your proposals or letter of intent to participate to rixc [at] rixc [dot] lv, and/or rasa [at] rixc [dot] lv (Rasa Smite).  DEADLINE: August 20, 2012

For more information, please visit http://renewable.rixc.lv

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Internationalism and the Environment Panel Saturday 18 Aug,11:30am at Edinburgh Festival Fringe Central #edfringe

Saturday 18th August: 11.30 – 1.00

In a world increasingly aware of the importance of sustainability, how can the arts best continue to be international? Do new technologies offer exciting ways of making the arts even more international? How can we both tour our work and be green? A panel discussion with David Grieg, internationally-performed playwright, Kate Ward, General Manager of the London International Festival of Theatre, and Ian Garrett, Director of the Centre for Sustainable Practice in the Arts.

 

ABOUT THE PANELISTS

David Greig

(From Wikipedia) is a Scottish playwright and theatre director. Greig was born in Edinburgh in 1969 and was brought up in Nigeria. He studied drama at Bristol University. He has been commissioned by the Royal Court Theatre, the Royal National Theatre and the Royal Shakespeare Company amongst others.

His first play was produced in Glasgow in 1992. His plays have been produced around the world. In 1990 he co-founded Suspect Culture Theatre Company with Graham Eatough and Nick Powell in Glasgow. His plays include Europe (1995), The Architect (1996, filmed in 2006 (see The Architect (film)), The Cosmonaut’s Last Message To The Woman He Once Loved In The Former Soviet Union (1999), and San Diego (2003).

Recent plays include Damascus (2007), The American Pilot (2005), Pyrenees (2005), San Diego (2003), Outlying Islands (2002), and Yellow Moon: The Ballad of Leila and Lee (2006). He has provided English-language versions of foreign plays, including Camus’s Caligula (2003), and Strindberg’s The Creditors (2008). His version of Euripides’s The Bacchae which opened the Edinburgh International   2007 starred Alan Cumming as the Greek god Dionysus with ten gospel singers as the Bacchae. The production subsequently transferred to the Lyric Hammersmith in September of that year. In 2010 his Dunsinane was premiered at the Hampstead Theatre by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Kate Ward

Kate Ward joined the LIFT team in November 2009 as General Manager. She has worked in arts administration across a variety of organisations; music agency, Musician’s Incorporated; Pop Up Theatre; design and animation studio, Neutral; and Red Shift, and developed a love for international work whilst working as personal assistant to Graham Sheffield at the Barbican.

Ian Garrett

Ian Garrett is a producer, designer and administrator, dedicated to innovative arts infrastructure. He is co-founder and a director of the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts (CSPA), a leader in the conversation on sustainability development and the arts and Assistant Professor of Ecological Design for Performance at York University in Toronto. He is the producer for CalArts Festival Theater, having produced and designed over 20 shows at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe since 2008.

UPCOMING EVENTS

What’s the Big Idea? – an Open Forum

Wednesday 22nd August: 16.00 – 17.30

A chance for you to air your views on how the arts can engage with environmental issues. How can we make the arts greener? What role do the arts have to play in changing people’s behaviour? What radical ideas do you have for the arts? How can we make next year’s Fringe the greenest Fringe? With provocations from Erica Whyman, Artistic Director of Northern Stage, and Anthony Alderson, Director of the Pleasance Theatre Trust.

Reuse and Recycle Days

Monday 27th and Tuesday 28th August: 11.00 – 16.00

Unused flyers, unwanted props, usable furniture, gorgeous costumes, venue and set construction materials – we want them all! Every Fringe tonnes of waste go to the bin when it could be recycled or reused elsewhere. A combination recycling depot and free rummage sale: bring what you have, take what you want. Contact Harry.Giles@festivalsedinburgh.com for the full details of what we can accept and how; we will be able to take most materials, but not aerosols, paint, lino, or vinyl.

CARBON 13

This post comes to you from Cultura21

The exhibition will run from 31st August 2012 – 17th February 2013. Opening: 31 August, 6–8pm

“With Carbon 13 and the Marfa Dialogues, Ballroom Marfa continues its mission of presenting art as a transforming media capable of addressing the most pressing issues of our time: The exhibition consists of newly commissioned work by eight international artists who have focused the lens of their creativity to interrogate the reality of climate change. These new and daring works demonstrate that one salient image can speak louder than volumes of scientific data and capture the public’s imagination with an immediate and resonate voice. In conjunction with the opening of Carbon 13, Ballroom Marfa and the Washington Spectator are proud to present the second bi-annual Marfa Dialogues, a three-day symposium that includes conversations around climate change and sustainability with artists, performers, writers, scientists and entrepreneurs. Participants include: Hamilton Fish, Cynthia Hopkins, Diana Liverman, John Nielsen-Gammon, Michael Pollan, Robert Potts, Tom Rand and Rebecca Solnit.” (e-flux)

Weekend schedule:

Friday, August 31, 2012

  • 6–8pm: Carbon 13 opening at Ballroom Marfa
  • 8–10pm: Community dinner at The Capri

Saturday, September 1, 2012

  • 9:30am: FarmStand Marfa
  • 10am: Marfa Lights Festival Parade
  • 1pm: Discussion: Art and Environmental Activism, moderated by Rebecca Solnit at the Crowley Theater
  • 3pm: Discussion: Climate Change and Adaptation, with Diana Liverman and John Nielsen-Gammon at the Crowley Theater
  • 6pm: Michael Pollan in conversation with Hamilton Fish at the Crowley Theater, co-presented with Dixon Water Foundation

Sunday, September 2, 2012

  • 9–11am: Brunch and guided nature walk on Mimms Ranch with Robert Potts
  • 1pm: Reading by Rebecca Solnit at Marfa Book Company
  • 3:30pm: Presentation by Tom Rand at Marfa Book Company
  • 8pm: Performance of This Clement World by Cynthia Hopkins at the Crowley Theater

For more information please visit www.ballroommarfa.org and www.capefarewell.com

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Seeking Fresh ideas, Freshly presented

This post comes to you from Cultura21

WOLFoundation – the Web of Life Foundation – is seeking submissions of essays to its annual competition that carries $2,000 in prizes

“WOLFoundation is a non-profit organization aimed at encouraging fresh thinking and clear, writing on subjects related to our environment. We are looking for ideas presented in a high quality, non-technical style. We welcome any opinion on environmental issues – be they for or against any particular debate or point of view.

We are looking for clear, compelling writing in the English language showing original thinking and new ideas. We welcome any form of writing – essays, fiction, short stories or any other form of prose written in accessible, enjoyable, style.”

Submission Requirements: Manuscripts must be written in English, double spaced, no longer than 2,000 words and contain no abstract, list of references or footnotes. Images are allowed as part of the manuscript. There are no fees or membership requirements for submission.

Deadline for submission is September 30th.

More details of the Foundation, detailed guidelines and last year’s winning essays can be found at www.wolfoundation.org

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Kristina Wong, the Fringe’s most Divisive and “Gutsy” Eco-Commedienne, becomes a Woman of the Night

By Jingo! The Scotsman might think you need to be American to enjoy her, but Kristina Wong, “A storyteller that sends sparks flying with every line” (Broadway Baby), is moving the five star Going Green the Wong Way from 10:30 to 19:00… and she’s taking her Mooncup with her!

Bucking consensus, Going Green the Wong Way “Starts with a literal bang, but it just keeps getting better”  says Broadway Baby, but the Scotsman says Wong’s a “relentlessly self-congratulator” with simply “occasional glimpses of comic talent”. How can we explain that? Well,”To be scrupulously fair, most of the largely American full house evidently enjoyed themselves.”(Scotsman). Discover the show that “exacerbates” our cultural divisions! We don’t think you need to wrap yourself in stars and stripes (except for those from 5 Star reviews) when American Public Media Marketplace Radio Commentator Kristina Wong’s hilarious tour-de-force comedy about her hysterical triumphs and pitfalls in sustainable living moves to a later time this weekend. Starting 19 August, Going Green the Wong Way moves to 19:00 and gives away its last free breakfast at 10:30 on Saturday the 18th.

“Please make your way to HollyWong,” where, at a young age, Kristina Wong was tapped by Mother Earth and entrusted with a quest: Save the Planet. In this mad-cap comedy, Wong weaves her true-life adventures as a tireless missionary of recycling. From confrontational 6th grade performance art to 2006, when her 1981 bubble gum pink Mercedes Benz—that had been converted to run on vegetable oil—left her with a never-ending series of car repairs before it finally burst into flames on the freeway, Going Green The Wong Way will have everyone asking What Would Mother Earth Do?

Going Green the Wong Way has been called “A Hoot!” by the Miami Herald and “A smart, brazen and raunchy parody of political correctness” by LA WEEKLY. Mother Nature Network dubbed her “One of America’s Funniest Eco-Comedians” who is “…an energetic, witty, uninhibited performer… a seamless, sure-fire comedic turn” according to Backstage West. Just take it from the San Francisco Bay Guardian, “There are hundreds of ways to go wrong when attempting to go green, but going Wong can only ever be right” or Broadway Baby who says she can “Do no Wong.”

For more information about Kristina Wong:

Kristina Wong’s website: http://kristinawong.com

Kristina Wong’s full bio: http://kristinawong.com/about

Wong on Marketplace discussing Carmageddon w/o a car: http://www.marketplace.org/topics/life/commentary/come-again-carmaggedon

Venue 13 was launched in 1996 as an initiative by the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama to promote the best new talent from Wales on a world stage. Now run in Collaboration with the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts), the 2012 season presents productions of emerging artists from Wales and California.

Tickets may be acquired by calling the venue 13 box office at 07074 20 1313 or logging on to the Edinburgh Fringe Website at http://www.edfringe.com

http://www.venue13.com/production/going-green-the-wong-way/

Dorsky Museum announces programs for Dear Mother Nature, Hudson Valley Artists 2012

This post comes to you from Cultura21

The Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art announces the programs they have organized in conjunction with the exhibition Dear Mother Nature, Hudson Valley Artists 2012, on display in the Alice and Horace Chandler Gallery through November 4.

The program, developed by curator Linda Weintraub and the exhibiting artists, seeks to increase audience understanding of individual artworks as well as exhibition themes and consists mainly of interactive performances, gallery talks, workshops and participatory ceremonies, planned from July to November, accompanying the exhibition.

Saturday, August 25

  • 2 pm – Free Gallery talk with Linda Weintraub, curator of Dear Mother Nature: Hudson Valley Artists 2012
  • 3 pm – Ceremonial meal with artist Mary Anne Davis, “Mala Meal”

Saturday, September 15

  • 2 pm – Free Gallery talk with Dear Mother Nature: Hudson Valley Artists 2012 curator, Linda Weintraub, and artists Christy Rupp and Elisa Pritzker
  • 2:30 pm – Performance: Jan Harrison will perform in “Animal Tongues.”
  • 3:30 pm – Demonstration: Hudson Valley artist Barbara Bash will show examples of her journaling work and demonstrate the heaven, earth and human principles at the heart of this process in a spontaneous drawing and writing performance.

Saturday, September 22

  • 2 pm – Free Gallery talk with Dear Mother Nature: Hudson Valley Artists 2012 curator, Linda Weintraub, and artists Angela Basile, Claudia McNulty, Meadow, Kathleen Anderson, Laura Moriarty, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, and Leslie Pelino
  • 3 pm – Demonstration/workshop: “The Language of Natural Materials”

Saturday, September 29

  • 2 pm – Free Gallery talk with Linda Weintraub, curator of Dear Mother Nature: Hudson Valley Artists 2012, and artists Raquel Rabinovich and Gina Palmer
  • 2:30 pm – Poetry Slam: Leila Goldthwaite – “Cheese Torte and Fish Tales: Poetry Theme Slam and Open Mic”
  • 3:30 pm – Workshop with artist Riva Weinstein – “Lifeline” creates a link between Mother Nature and humanity. Bring found objects. You will use them to create spontaneous and ephemeral assemblages. All ages are welcome.

Saturday, October 20

  • 2 pm – Drawing Performance: Jaanika Peerna, artist, and David Rothenberg, musician, respond to each moment’s breezes, moisture, sounds and many other offerings from Mother Nature through movement, drawing, and sound.
  • 3 pm – Dance Performance: “Tree – a Dance: trees we see, trees we dream, trees of our lineage”
  • Susan Osberg – choreography and direction, work with Dancers Company: Marika Blossfeldt, Elizabeth Castagna, Shannon Murphy and Susan Osberg, Tom Moore – photography, Steve Blamires – readings from his book, “Celtic Tree Mysteries”

You can also check our previous post about the exhibition Dear Mother Nature here.

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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The poets vs. neogreenwashing?

This post comes to you from Cultura21

“Any campaign to protect the wild world which avoids acknowledging our intuitive, emotional relationship with it will leave itself open to the kind of heartless ideological assault it is now receiving from the neogreens. […] Perhaps the best rejoinder to those who believe the world is a giant spreadsheet is an engagement with its messy, everyday complexity.”

Thus spoke “Dark Mountain Project” co-founder Paul Kingsnorth, in an article on the website of The Guardian on August 1st, about the “Neogreens” (or “neo-environmentalism”) movement and their promise that “science and business will provide while nature can adapt”.

To read the full article: click here

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Cultura21 eBook Vol. 6: Sustainable Fashion

This post comes to you from Cultura21

New Approaches within the Fashion Industries

Our 6th volume in the Cultura21 eBooks series – by Rana Öztürk

This eBook analyzes current developments in the fashion industries related to the debate on the Cultural and Creative Industries. The author’s approach includes the particularities of the debate about social, economic, aesthetic and anthropological aspects and, lastly, the current discursive and practical changes towards the idea of sustainable development.

The focus lies on two main aspects: First, the implementation of new sustainable practices within the production sector of the fashion field, and second, a mindset change in consumer behavior.

Rana Öztürk: Sustainable Fashion. Link: eBook Vol. 6 as PDF

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

Powered by WPeMatico