Monthly Archives: June 2013

Sea Change / Tionndadh na Mara

Swan1-600x415Cape Farewell’s Northern Isles Expedition 

From 19 August – 8 September Cape Farewell sails from Orkney to Shetland via Fair Isle with 2 crews of 11 artists and scientists on the 113-year-old Shetland community boat, the Swan. Sailors include Ursula Biemann, Julie Brook, James Brady, David Cross, John Cumming, Bryony Lavery, Ruth Maclennan, Deirdre Nelson, Karine Polwart, Inge Thomson, Jennifer Wilcox, Tom Rand and Tam Treanor. Along with scientists from the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton and the International Centre for Island Technology, Heriot-Watt University, the artists will pursue research and new collaborations relating to climate impacts on ocean ecologies, fisheries, energy production and peatlands.

Sexy Peat / Tìr mo Rùin

Highland Print Studio and Cape Farewell are delighted to announce the commissioned artists for the Sexy Peat project, celebrating the ecology and heritage of the Lewis blanket bog and highlighting the significant role that peat plays in climate regulation. Alex Boyd, Anne Campbell, Jon Macleod, Kacper Kowalski, Murray Robertson and Paul Slater will follow summer residencies in Lewis with printmaking workshops in Inverness, leading to a touring exhibition of new work.

Follow Sea Change and on Twitter @CFSeaChange. 

ECOISMI 2013

12 - Dada d'Adda - Susanna BattinSunday, June 2 inaugurated Ecoismi, 2013, an international event for contemporary art in the heart of the Natural Park of the Island Borromeo in Cassano d’Adda, Province of Milan.

Ecoismi is a public art project that reflects on the processes and transformations that relate to the territory, the environment and present condition to trigger a reflection on the dynamics of ecological and sustainable.

Through the language of contemporary art, artists, architects and designers were invited to confront the issue of balance between man and nature. During the period of residence – work in progress they have created a multisensory path consisting of twelve site-specific installations realized n the area of the Natural Park.

The event, this year at its second edition, is curated by Ylbert Durishti and young artists, selected through a call, come from all over the world. They are: TheFleetGroup (Tbilisi, Georgia), AtelierFraSe (London, England), Päivi Raivio (Helsinki, Finland), Grace Zanotto (Milan, Italy), Matteo Rota (Casirate d’Adda, Italy), Julia Jamrozik (Basel, Switzerland) , Ada Kobusiewicz (Petrovaradin, Serbia), Chiara Sgaramella (Valencia, Spain), Diana Franceschin (Milan, Italy), Giacomo Zaganelli (Berlin, Germany), Selene Volpi (Senatobia, Italy), Susanna Battin (Los Angeles, USA).

Each of them has developed the themes of the project according to its own specific declination, in a variety of shades ranging from the question of energy savings that of climate change,from the action of man on the environment to the disappearance of some species.

All artworks are made with natural materials, recycled or recovered. The artists have based their poetry on the reuse of waste materials were reinserted in a cycle that brings them back to life, where nature and art have the opportunity to renew their reciprocal myth.

ARTWORKS

Radici (Roots) by AtelierFraSe (Francesco Gorni and Serena Montesissa) is an architectural intervention to “experience” the trees as living organisms, through the creation of wood niches in which visitors take their seats. Again in wood is made by The fleet Group (Vasili Macharadze and Bessa Kartlelishvili), the sculptural work Mesh, in which the two authors report an object, the foot into the wild after being initially converted into trigonometric language.

Blackout project by Ada Kobusiewicz introduces us to the theme of ongoing climate change on our planet and invites to reflect on the question of energy savings. Also Arca (Ark) by Chiara Sgaramella is focused on raising public awareness, her work aims to celebrate biodiversity by building an ark.

The intention of Grace Zanotto with Lux Flower, a photo-luminescent flower that opens to the sun, is to create an installation that speaks of art as a possibility for dialogue between the species that live on Earth, to renegotiate the rights of all living beings.

The geometry is deeply connected to both Ramificioconnessioni by Matteo Rota – which reconstructs the vascular branching of the leaves and branches of trees tie in the three spatial dimensions through the figure of the cube – and the project Kreuzungen by Giacomo Zaganelli who wants to pay homage to the relationship between man-nature representing the contemporary environment through a large installation by floral appearance, made with linen thread.

The work Un mondo sommerso (A submerged world) by Diana Franceschin want to flip up and down and the elements earth, air and water, immersing the viewer in a hypothetical dip in the middle of a group of fish. While Skyfield, by Julia Jamrozik, is based on the idea of capturing the ephemeral and changing nature of heaven, and bring it to the ground, providing a new context for its remark.

Päivi Raivio is the author of Unwind, an installation that uses the element of the wind, is composed of aeolian harps, forming a corridor 20 meters long. The project of Selene Volpi concerns sound research of natural elements, Scatole sonore (Boxes Sheet) is an artwork composed by a collection of sculptures that play with the action of the wind.

The project Dada d’Adda di Susanna Battin, is found in many parts of the park and is in direct connection with either observation of the territory of the island and with eleven works realized by other artists.

The objective of Ecoismi is indeed to activate a process of raising awareness of environmental issues by introducing principles of “urban ecology”. It also aims to bring contemporary art to diverse audiences by implementing a model of creative enhancement of externalities of the territory.

The exhibition is open every day until 22 September. Admission is free.

More Info: www.ecoismi.org or www.comune.cassanodadda.mi.it

The Foraged Book Project

220583_103475879807133_1603288737_oA collaboration between renowned forager Fergus Drennan and artist James Wood to produce a unique book made entirely from plants foraged from the wild, and to host related public events that will offer participants deeply engaging interactions with the natural world including food making and participating arts.

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Together Fergus and James will collaborate on the production of a book. Physically every material used within the book will be foraged and processed by either Fergus or James. The content of the book will include information, recipes, illustrations, tips and hints on foraging and processing materials for food and art equipment. The book will show the wonderful possibilities that lie within the natural landscapessurrounding us. It will get people interested in foraging and will offer different perspectives on derelict urban plots, parks and green spaces – revealing the potential of how these spaces can be used beyond walking spots.

Whilst Fergus and James will develop the book as collaboration, a key part of the project will be to pass on the information and techniques we learn during the research stages of the books production to a wider audience as well as allowing them to participate in a form of sustainable art. To achieve this, we will carry out a number of workshops and wildlife tours that include teaching and performing some of the recipes used within the book whilst keeping a continued focus on some combined Artistic outcomes. For more information on up and coming workshops, exhibitions and tours join our mailing list or watch our twitter and facebook pages as well as the Workshops section of this site.

http://www.theforagedbookproject.co.uk/

Foraged Book on Facebook

Don’t Miss the 2013 Women In Green Forum

This post comes to you from Green Public Art

wigflogoNOglowJoin Green Public Art Consultancy for the 2013 Women In Green Forum (WIGF), the premier network and conference series for women in the environmental industry.  This year, the forum will expand to both coasts of the U.S with events in Los Angeles, California, and Washington, D.C.  The WIGF brings together an international audience of environmental leaders ranging from corporate sustainability officers to academic researchers to technology developers. The WIGF also appeals to regulatory agencies involved in developing the policies and legislation which will further the development and propagation of green technologies on our roads, in our homes and at our schools.

WIGF West Coast – August 28, 2013

WIGF East Coast – September 2013

Take advantage of a 10% registration discount by following the instructions below:

Please visit the Women in Green registration page by clicking HERE for WIGF West Coast and HERE for WIGF East Coast  When prompted to “ Enter Promotional Code” under the “Ticket Information” section of the registration page, please enter “EndorserGPAC” for your registration discount. We encourage everyone to register as soon as possible.  Given the conference has an international reach, it is expected to reach capacity prior to the day of the event.

For more information, go to www.womeningreenforum.com or email info@womeningreenforum.com

Rebecca Ansert, founder of Green Public Art, is an art consultant who specializes in artist solicitation, artist selection, and public art project management for both private and public agencies. She is a graduate of the master’s degree program in Public Art Studies at the University of Southern California and has a unique interest in how art can demonstrate green processes or utilize green design theories and techniques in LEED certified buildings.

Green Public Art is a Los Angeles-based consultancy that was founded in 2009 in an effort to advance the conversation of public art’s role in green building. The consultancy specializes in public art project development and management, artist solicitation and selection, creative community involvement and knowledge of LEED building requirements. Green Public Art also works with emerging and mid-career studio artists to demystify the public art process. The consultancy acts as a resource for artists to receive one-on-one consultation before, during, and after applying for a public art project.
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Game-Changing Fracking Wastewater Report

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Just saw this,

Alberta-based environmental consultant Jessica Ernst just released the first comprehensive catalog and summary compendium of facts related to the contamination of North America’s ground water sources resulting from the oil and gas industry’s controversial practice of fracking. continues…

Game-Changing Fracking Wastewater Report Leaves Little Wiggle Room For Industry Deceptions – EcoWatch: Cutting Edge Environmental News Service.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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The 7th Triennial of Contemporary Art

This post comes to you from Cultura21

LOGO-U3June 20 – 29 September 2013, Resilience,

Organised by the Moderna galerija with Museum of Contemporary Art Metelkova,Ljubljana,Slovenia

In recent years the concept of resilience has grown out of the global trend of developing sustainability in the societies of the global North. In natural sciences or physics, a resilient body is described as flexible, durable, and capable of springing back to its original form and transforming the energy received into its own reconstruction (a good example of this is the sponge). Resilience encompasses exploring reciprocal codependence and finding one’s political and socio-ecological place in a world that is out of balance and creates increasingly disadvantageous living conditions. Rather than trying to find global solutions for some indefinite future or projecting a possible perfect balance, resilient thinking focuses on the diversity of practical solutions for the here and now, and on the cooperation and creativity of everyone involved in a community or society.

The 7th Triennial of Contemporary Art in Slovenia gives prominence to practices that can be seen as analogous to the concept of resilience, i.e. community-oriented, site-specific, participatory, performative, architectural, social, civic and other discursive practices exploring new (or revived) community principles, such as the “do-it-together,” urban gardening, and co-working, as well as the fundamental social question of how we coexist. Blending work and everyday life forms the basis of new economic, ethical, and production principles that the younger generation of artists uses to transform the role of the creative subject in contemporary Slovenian society. On the one hand this opens dialogues with biotechnology, critical theory, and political activism, underscoring, on the other hand, the cyclic nature of time by reviving traditional knowledge and techniques. Occurring across many platforms—the exhibition, performative projects, discussions—the triennial also gives the young generations an opportunity to express their potential through addressing urgent local and global socio-political problems and contributing to the debate in and over existing Slovenian cultural policy.

For more information about the program : http://u3trienale.mg-lj.si/en/program/

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Defining Climate Change Photography

This post comes from Chantal Bilodeau’s Artists and Climate Change Blog

photo by Joan Sullivanphoto by Joan Sullivan

Quebec-based photographer Joan Sullivan wrote a very insightful post on her blog about climate change photography and the role of climate change photographers in influencing the debate about the way forward.

Also, make sure you look at her website for some stunning photographs.

Filed under: Photography

Artists and Climate Change is a blog by playwright Chantal Bilodeau that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to Chantal Bilodeau’s Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Tipping Point event London

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Representing Uncertainty

Who: Academics at KCL and artists from the wider community

When: Tuesday 2 July 2013, 5:00-9:00 pm

Where: Pyramid Room, Strand Campus, King’s College London

TippingPoint_logo2

TippingPoint, in partnership with the King’s Cultural Institute, is going to be holding a series of workshops that brings together academics from King’s College London with artists and other interested parties in the wider community. The aim is to explore particular subjects in depth, subjects which are of particular interest to the academics concerned, the artistic community, the broader public, and which also have a bearing on climate change.

We are delighted to announce that the first of these “Representing Uncertainty” will take place on Tuesday, 2 July 2013 from 5.00 to 9.00 PM, in the Pyramid Room (K4U.04, King’s Building, 4th Floor) at the Strand campus of King’s College London (see Building ‘A’ in the bottom map here).

Bruce D. Malamud, Professor of Natural and Environmental Hazards in the Department of Geography, will be presenting his perspective on the subject of how uncertainty can be represented, to be echoed by a presentation by an artist. The idea is to bring together scientific, artistic and other views on uncertainty in the world around us, so that different viewpoints might learn from each other.

This will be a working session, with plenty of opportunity for discussion in groups. It will also be very open-ended; if possible, Bruce is keen to pursue some form of scientific-artistic collaboration, and the possibility will certainly exist of applying for funding to support this under the KCI’s Creative Futures Programme.

This will certainly be an evening to attend if you are interested in the subject from an artistic perspective. Please let Yvonne Castle (yvonne.castle@kcl.ac.uk) know if you would like to attend. Drinks and nibbles will be served!

 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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Land Arts Generator Initiative events

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Arsenal-Gallery-200x300June 27- August 30, Arsenal Gallery, Central Park, New York

“Our civilization has been built on non-renewable resources and an outmoded presumption that nature is limitless. Certainly art will continue to serve many purposes; however, for artists and designers who choose to engage in what Joanna Macy terms The Great Turning, what is the role of beauty?” —Ann T. Rosenthal

This opening event kick off the summer exhibition at Arsenal Gallery (in Central Park), NYC, is also act as the book launch to their latest publication “Regenerative Infrastructures,” which features 60 submissions to the 2012 LAGI design competition for Freshkills Park as well as several essays, including “Redefining Beauty within the Context of Sustainability” by Ann Rosenthal

Formerly a symbol of immense urban waste, the Fresh Kills Landfill is being transformed into an enormous parkland destined to exemplify the values of ecological restoration and environmental sustainability. In partnership with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, the Land Art Generator Initiative held an ideas competition for a site-specific public artwork designed to operate as a source of clean energy for the city utility grid, using Freshkills Park as the design site. This volume features many of the top submissions to that open call, each with the capacity to power hundreds of homes. The Land Art Generator Initiative creates sustainable design solutions that integrate art and technology into renewable energy infrastructure around the world. Regenerative Infrastructures draws a much needed connection between the two critical issues of sustainable development—energy generation and waste management—highlighting solutions that address both problems at once, thereby creating economically beneficial hybrid utility installations.

For more information : http://landartgenerator.org/newsevents/

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Cultura21: How can culture lead transformations?

This post comes to you from Culture|Futures

culture21_collage_june2013In the coming year, Cultura21 Nordic will be working with partners to bring pioneering agents from the Baltic Sea Region together and create a ‘flagship project’ on the issue of culture and sustainability: ‘Baltic Sea Region cooperation with a focus on culture as a part of sustainable development’.

In April 2013, Cultura 21 Nordic and Innogate launched a 16-page report titled ‘Culture and Sustainable Development in the Baltic Sea Region – 8 findings, a number of opportunities and a way forward…’.

The Baltic Sea Region is very rich in networks and cooperation efforts – many of which build on and impact on culture and sustainable development. The mapping and findings reported aim to identify current actors, networks and existing relevant cooperation activities that address specific areas related to culture and sustainability in the Baltic Sea Region.

Commissioned by the Nordic Council of Ministers and based on research interviews with, among many others, cultural institutions such as the Danish Cultural Institute, the Swedish Institute, Intercult, and Heinrich Böll Stiftung, the report is meant to serve as as a point of departure for discussions which, when duly digested, will lead to concrete and feasible activities designed to enable culture to impact more strongly on sustainable development in the Baltic Sea Region.

The report also points at key areas of interest for further cooperation.

Perhaps not surprisingly the first finding in the year-long process was that the sphere of cultural collaboration and sustainability is complex, or rather: that there are a number of spheres. Thus the overview presented in the report, according to the authors, is “more of a snapshot than a full picture.”

Lack of knowledge
Summing up, and looking through their findings, the authors conclude it is apparent that the largest obstacle for enabling culture to impact on sustainable development in the Baltic Sea Region seems to be a lack of knowledge about culture-driven practises, tools and cooperation approaches for sustainable development:

“There are many actors that in different ways make an effort to impact on sustainable development through culture(s). However, their efforts remain fragmented – and knowledge of good (and bad) practices are not effectively collected and communicated. There is a need to link efforts more effectively through dialogue and cooperation, to facilitate exchanges of experience and mutual learning. There is also a need to assess current efforts if the key drivers for enabling culture to impact on sustainable development are to be better understood.”

Therefore the report suggests to investigate if one of the existing institutions in the Baltic Sea Region could/should host a knowledge hub on culture and sustainability – a hub that would provide access to practices, tools and networks within the Baltic Sea Region on culture and sustainability.

And if so, the authors ask, should such a hub have one location or rather be made up of a number of competence nodes – say “Culture and Sustainability Smart Labs” at different locations around the Baltic Sea – linked through the main hub?

“The advantage of multiple decentralised competence nodes/labs could be that it would allow local actors to tap more easily into the knowledge resources available in their region and, and through the link to the main hub across the Baltic Sea Region. Both the main competence hub and decentralised labs/nodes could be hosted by existing organisations.”

Slide presentation
In his presentation at the conference ‘Culture and Collaboration in the South East Baltic Region’ in Kaliningrad in June 2013, director Oleg Kofoed started out with asking the basic question: “How can culture lead transformations?”
Oleg Kofoed’s 15-slide presentation can been seen on slideshare.net

Culture provides a framework
The report suggests an answer this question — how culture can lead transformations. For instance, it states that:
“Culture is of great importance to economically, socially and environmentally sustainable development. Culture is important not least because culture is a bond that brings people of a community (town, city, country or region) together and because it provides a framework that shapes people’s standards and behaviour. In so doing, culture impacts in multiple ways on development in most areas of society. For example culture impacts significantly on business opportunities, job creation, integration, health, education, technologies, and creativity – and in so doing culture impacts on sustainable development. This overall role of culture seems to be generally accepted, in particular – and not surprisingly – among stakeholders in the cultural sector/sphere but also increasingly so also across sectors/spheres.”

The report mentions that at recent COP meetings, cultural aspects of sustainability have grown in importance:

“In 2010 the UNESCO partner United Cities and Local Governments declared culture “The Fourth Pillar of Sustainability”. This was followed in 2012 by the Rio+20 UN conference, which declared:“We acknowledge the diversity of the world and recognize that all cultures and civilisations contribute to the enrichment of humankind and the protection of the Earth’s life support system. We emphasize the importance of culture for sustainable development. We call for a holistic approach to sustainable development which will guide humanity to live in harmony with nature.”

The logic is that by including culture in sustainability one achieves a more complete development model which – it is argued – better embraces the complexity of societies and highlights the importance of culture as a driver of societal change and development.” (…)

“The recently updated Action Plan for the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region does emphasise the importance of culture to sustainable development, as part of a dedicated Priority Area for Culture and associated cooperation activities. The Nordic Council of Ministers is committed to taking responsibility for advancing regional cooperation under the Priority Area for Culture – including by leading the Flagship Project ‘Baltic Sea Region cooperation with a focus on culture as a part of sustainable development’.

This paper is a first effort under this flagship project. It is an attempt to map stakeholders and activities in the field of culture and sustainability. It is also a first effort to engage stakeholders in a new region-wide dialogue aiming at identifying opportunities for synergies in current efforts, and to propose practical steps for further cooperation in the field of culture and sustainability. The longer-term objective of the Nordic Council of Ministers is to take the first steps – along with partners from around the Baltic Sea – towards systematically developing knowledge and capacities in the Baltic Sea Region on ways in which culture contributes, and can contribute more, to sustainable development – whether be it economically, socially and/or environmentally sustainable development.”


Cultura21 Nordic is a Culture|Futures partner. The organisation, run by action-philosophers Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan and based in Copenhagen, Denmark, works for cultures of sustainability in the Nordic countries and around.

cultura21.dk

• Download the report (PDF)

Culture|Futures is an international collaboration of organizations and individuals who are concerned with shaping and delivering a proactive cultural agenda to support the necessary transition towards an Ecological Age by 2050.

The Cultural sector that we refer to is an interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral, inter-genre collaboration, which encompasses policy-making, intercultural dialogue/cultural relations, creative cities/cultural planning, creative industries and research and development. It is those decision-makers and practitioners who can reach people in a direct way, through diverse messages and mediums.

Affecting the thinking and behaviour of people and communities is about the dissemination of stories which will profoundly impact cultural values, beliefs and thereby actions. The stories can open people’s eyes to a way of thinking that has not been considered before, challenge a preconceived notion of the past, or a vision of the future that had not been envisioned as possible. As a sector which is viewed as imbued with creativity and cultural values, rather than purely financial motivations, the cultural sector’s stories maintain the trust of people and society.
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