Monthly Archives: November 2013

Where art and nature meet: Curator Jane Ingram Allen on the first International Nature Art Curators’ Conference in Korea | Art Radar Asia

For the first time, curators from around the world came together in South Korea to discuss the the art of curating nature. 

The inaugural International Nature Art Curators’ Conference was held in Gongju, South Korea, from 30 September to 5 October 2013. Jane Ingram Allen, Curator of Taiwan’s Cheng Long Wetlands International Environmental Art Project, shares her thoughts on the conference and the symbiosis between art and nature across the world.

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The International Nature Art Curators’ Conference in Korea, the first event of its kind, included presentations by nineteen invited international curators from thirteen different countries, all of whom are doing projects involving art and nature. I was one of the invited curators and I presented information and photos about the Cheng Long Wetlands International Environmental Art Project, which I have been curating in Taiwan each year since 2010.

This project, held in the small fishing village of Cheng Long on the Southwest coast of Taiwan, brings together six artists from different countries to make site-specific sculpture installations, using natural and recycled materials, that focus on different environmental issues each year. The goal of the Cheng Long Art Project is to raise awareness about environmental issues, and we invite artists to create temporary site-specific artworks that can contribute positively to the environment and go back to nature over time. At the Korea conference, I was able to show photos of past installations in Cheng Long and talk about the curatorial concepts for this project.

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What is “nature art”?

Although the conference was focused on nature art, not everyone necessarily defines “nature art” in the same way. Some call this type of art “land art”, others call it “eco-art” and “environmental art.” This conference brought out the many ways that this type of art can be defined, and how in Asia “nature art” has a long history and a unique approach. Man is part of nature and the focus is on living harmoniously with nature, rather than the usual western way of trying to conquer and control nature. Many of the projects and artworks shown by other curators at the conference seem to have no focus on environmental issues, but are more about man’s relationship with the natural world and putting artworks in a natural setting that could be about any subject and using any materials or techniques.

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Sharing the spirit of nature art

The most important benefit of this conference in Korea was the opportunity to meet other curators who are interested in art and nature, and to find out what they are doing in different parts of the world. The first seminar at the conference was called “Sharing the Spirit of Nature Art”, and included a presentation by me about the Cheng Long International Environmental Art Project. Other speakers were:

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At the second seminar, “Moving Nature and Art”, presentations were made by:

  • Clive Adams, Director of the UK Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World
  • John K. Grande, an independent environmental art writer and curator who has curated international nature art exhibitions at botanical gardens in Canada
  • Giacomo Bianchi, President of Arte Sella, a nature art park in Italy with installations by international artists
  • Sue Spaid, environmental art curator now living in Belgium who has curated eco-art exhibitions and directed art centres in the USA.
  • Opening up the discussion 

    One unusual aspect of the conference’s organisation was that pointed questioners were designated for each of the presenters. After the formal presentations the questioners, who were invited speakers and international artists-in-residence in Gongju, asked questions of each speaker. The discussion was also opened up afterwards to questions from the audience, which included local artists, curators, professors and some students from the university. This method of having people designated to ask questions did ensure that there would be some discussion after the speeches, but it seemed a bit awkward and forced to me.

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    The International Nature Art Conference was a great opportunity to exchange ideas about art and nature, and to see new artworks by different artists. As one of the invited curators, Grant Pound, Director of Colorado Art Ranch, USA, put it,

    The major benefit (…) was connecting with people doing projects in other parts of the world and finding those similar to Colorado Art Ranch. This conference was a chance to find new artists and to meet people from other countries doing similar projects.

    The range of projects presented at the conference was amazing, from the large Arte Sella project in Italy, which includes hundreds of artworks by well-known international artists and a sizeable budget with thousands of visitors each year, to small projects such as the Oranki Art Project in Lapland, Finland, started by a young artist couple,Tuomas and Ninni Korkalo.

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    On the third day of the conference we also had presentations by other curators invited to this conference, such as Anni Snyman (South Africa), Director of international land art project Site Specific, Rumen Dmitrov (Bulgaria), Founder of Nature Art Symposium Gabrotski bringing international nature artists to Bulgaria to create site-specific works, and Lynn Bennet-McKenzie (Scotland), Director of nature art programme Ceangal bringing artists to the Scottish highlands to create site-specific nature art. The presentations also included those by other artist groups in Korea that are interested in art and nature, such as Magmamnews, Alternative Art Space Sonahmoo, International Baggat Art Exhibition and of course, Yatoo, the organiser of this conference.

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    The artists in Yatoo have been doing “nature art” since a handful of young artists founded the group in 1981. The group has presented the Geumgang Nature Art Biennale since 2004, an event that invites many Korean and foreign artists to Gongju every two years to create site-specific installations in a beautiful area along the Geum River. As conference participants, we toured this nature area and saw many interesting artworks by foreign and Korean artists.

    One of the most interesting works we saw was by artist Ko Seung-hyan: an interactive, stylised traditional Korean musical instrument, the artwork is created from a huge tree trunk whose branches act as amplifiers for the sound when visitors play the instrument. Ko is one of the founding members of Yatoo and one of the organisers of the conference along with Mr. Jeon Won-gil, Director of the Yatoo International Project and chief organiser of the International Nature Art Curator’s Conference 2013.

    Another sculpture installation, created for a previous biennale, was a series of metal rings installed under a bridge by Yatoo artist Ri Eung-woo. This sculpture, whose metal rings are arranged in a pattern to represent the notes of a traditional Korean folk song, examines ways to represent sound visually.

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    Nature art goes nomadic 

    Many hours at this first conference were spent discussing what the Yatoo organisers call the Global Nomadic Project. The organisers’ idea is to bring nature art on the road and travel to many different countries around the world from 2015 to 2018, sharing their art and interacting with colleagues in different countries. One disappointment for me about this conference was that the focus tended to be more about Yatoo’s Global Nomadic Project and not so much the broader idea of moving nature art forward. I expected the conference to focus more on networking and exchanging ideas about international nature art or environmental art around the world. The Yatoo conference organisers assured us that artists from other countries would also be able to join the Global Nomadic Project and travel with them to other countries making their works. However, it was not clear how the other artists would be selected or how they would be supported, since Yatoo expects to get funding for the Global Nomadic Project from the South Korean government’s art council. Some funds may be available to help fund foreign consulting curators and administrative expenses in other countries.

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    International networks must be strengthened 

    I also was a little disappointed to see that I was the only one attending this conference that represented a project in an Asian country. It seems that Yatoo does need some help to reach out to other like-minded organisations and artists in other countries, particularly in Asia. There was one organisation from Africa, but none from South America or Australia.

    However, the conference did result in the publication of a book that lists the international nature art organisations known to Yatoo, with photos and contact information. This is a great resource and should be expanded to include more organisations around the world that do land art, nature art or environmental/eco-art. I realise that funding was limited and all those who applied could not attend. The Yatoo organisers did ask the curators attending the conference to help to expand the list of nature art organisations around the world. I hope that this first conference of nature art curators can foster more meetings of international groups interested in the environment and art, and spread this movement to more countries.

    Jane Ingram Allen

    Via Art Radar Asia.

    Emergence Website Launch

    Emergence Website Live!

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    The new Emergence website is now live.  It can be viewed here, www.emergence-uk.org.

    The timing of the website going live incidentally marked the anniversary of the third year of Emergence activities since the first event at Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff on October 28th 2010.

    The website is a working archive of all the talks, creative presentations, films, maps, documentslinkscontributors and collaborators. It has information on all the projects from the 2010 CardiffSwansea and Caernarfon conferences to the Document LaunchEmergence SummitCreu Cymru Emergence initiative and Suzi Gablik’s Doin’ Dirt Time. The site gives users access to read and download the Emergence document, view individual films of talks by Bedwyr WilliamsMenna Elfyn,Judith KnightRob Newman and many others, watch the feature film ‘Walking to the Summit,’ download the maps of the Emergence Land Journey, check out past Emergence artist commissions and listen to a number of the collaborators ‘Talking about Emergence’ including Paul Allen, Rhodri Thomas, Jenny Mackewn and Lucy Neal. The Emergence website is intended to be a place which houses and celebrates the work of artists and practitioners who are ‘living the future now’ whilst working towards a sustainable planet. It also tells the story behind the Emergence project as we see it and is a place to hear about future projects, collaborations and gatherings.

    New Emergence website now live!

    Pay us a visit at: www.emergence-uk.org!

    Via Emergence.

    Inaugural CLIMARTE Forum

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    The Inaugural CLIMARTE Public Forum
    Art Climate Ethics: What role for the arts?
    6.00 – 7.30pm Saturday 15 February, 2014

    We are pleased to present Art Climate Ethics: What role for the arts?
    at Deakin Edge, Federation Square, Melbourne, as part of the Sustainable Living Festival.

    Art Climate Ethics will consider the role of the arts in this time of environmental challenge.  What ethical responsibility does the arts have to engage with these challenging issues? What is the important role the arts can play in understanding and deepening our engagement with the challenge of climate change? Hear what leading thinkers in art, science and philosophy have to say.

    Can you help us make this happen?

    We know you are passionate about role of the arts in addressing climate change – so we need your help to raise the last $5,000 we need to make CLIMARTE’s first Public Forum an event that can’t be ignored!  This forum will attract over 500 people and will form a launch pad for CLIMARTE’s ongoing calendar of events. Your support, at any level, will make a significant contribution and ensure that Art Climate Ethics can have maximum impact:
    $25 will help towards artists’ travel;
    $50 will help towards speakers’ fees;
    $250 will help towards artists’ accommodation;
    $1,000 help us film the forum so we can broadcast it later;
    But any amount will be most welcome!

    Walkley award winning Journalist Rafael Epstein will moderate the panel of speakers including Philosopher Damon Young from the University of Melbourne, leading Australian Artists, Fiona Hall AO and Mandy Martin, and Scientist Professor Steven Chown from Monash University.Thanks to the Australia Cultural Fund and Creative Partnership Australia your donation is fully tax deductible and you can make it online right here!

    Thank you for your support.

    CLIMARTE’s address is:
    PO Box 2429 Richmond South
    Victoria 3121 AUSTRALIACopyright © 2013 CLIMARTE INC., All rights reserved.

    CLIMARTE is a Registered Trademark.

    Via Inaugural CLIMARTE Forum.

    Call for Proposals: 2014 Cheng Long Wetlands International Environmental Art Project in Taiwan

    Call for Proposals

    2014 Cheng Long Wetlands International Environmental Art Project in Taiwan

    “Fishing for a Better Environment”

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    Artists from all countries are invited to send a proposal for a site-specific outdoor sculpture installation that will celebrate the seafood producers and fishermen of Cheng Long village in Taiwan and raise awareness about environmental issues relating to seafood production, the main livelihood of Cheng Long residents.  The artworks will be created during a 25-day artist-in-residency in Taiwan working with the community and school children from April 10 to May 5, 2014.  Selected artists will receive a stipend (about US$2000), round trip airfare, accommodations and meals, volunteer help and free recycled and natural materials.  For more information and to apply, see the Blog at http://artproject4wetland.wordpress.com or contact Curator Jane Ingram Allen at allenrebeccanjanei@gmail.com.

    Deadline for Entries: January 18, 2014
    Artists will be selected and notified by February 17, 2014
    Installation and Residency in Cheng Long, Kouhu Township, Taiwan: April 1(artists arrive) – May 5, 2014 (artists depart)
    Dates of the Exhibition: May 2, 2014 (opening ceremony), May 3 and 4 – Opening weekend activities with the artists.  The exhibition will stay on display through 2015, and we hope the artworks can continue to be enjoyed into the next year.

    Download the English CALL here:
    CALL for Proposals – 2014 ChengLong Wetlands Environmental Art Project.doc
    CALL for Proposals – 2014 ChengLong Wetlands Environmental Art Project.pdf

    Via Cheng-Long Wetlands International Environmental Art Project

    GhostFood: Forever Lost to Climate Change

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    GhostFood was an event held in the middle of October 2013. It was outside the Robert Rauschenberg Project Space, 455 West 19th Street New York, NY

    Gallery Aferro presented GhostFood, a participatory performance by Miriam Simun and Miriam Songster that explored eating in a future of food scarcity and biodiversity loss brought on by climate change. GhostFood is a food truck that serves, via wearable device, simulated taste experiences of foods threatened with extinction due to the effects of climate change. Scents of threatened foods were paired with climate change-resilient food stuffs, and exchanged for ideas with the public.

    Miriam Simun is a research-based artist investigating the implications of socio-technical and environmental change. She has exhibited and lectured widely, and is a 2013 Creative Capital Grantee in the Emerging Fields for her project EAT YOUR FUTURE. Miriam Songster applies her background in sculpture, video and installation to the creation of scent-based immersive works that engage with the themes of minimalism, site-specificity, and the multi-faceted nature of sensory perception.

    websites:

    http://www.songster.net

    http://www.miriamsimun.com

    via Marfa Dialogues 2013 / New York | Gallery Aferro.

    Thailand: Conference on climate change and cultural heritage

    This post comes to you from Culture|Futures

    Thailand: Conference on climate change and cultural heritage

    The International Conference on Cultural Heritage and Disaster Risk Reduction, held in Thailand on 18-20 November 2013 addressed the issues of climate change and the threat it poses to cultural heritage.

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    “While it is acknowledged that climate change is a major issue that impacts negatively on the environment and has subsequent consequences in relation to increased flooding, drought, rising temperatures, energy supplies, food supplies, social structures including migration, lack of resources leading to increased conflict, poverty, and other social ills; rarely is the impact of climate change on cultural heritage – both tangible and intangible – addressed. This conference aims to make explicit the link between climate change and the threat it poses to cultural heritage and to highlight the importance of adopting disaster risk reduction strategies.”

    International Conference on Cultural Heritage and Disaster Risk Reduction
    Venue: Windsor Suites Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand
    Date: November 18, 2013 – November 20, 2013
    Website: seameo-spafa.org

    Read more:
    asemus.museum

    Culture|Futures is an international collaboration of organizations and individuals who are concerned with shaping and delivering a proactive cultural agenda to support the necessary transition towards an Ecological Age by 2050.

    The Cultural sector that we refer to is an interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral, inter-genre collaboration, which encompasses policy-making, intercultural dialogue/cultural relations, creative cities/cultural planning, creative industries and research and development. It is those decision-makers and practitioners who can reach people in a direct way, through diverse messages and mediums.

    Affecting the thinking and behaviour of people and communities is about the dissemination of stories which will profoundly impact cultural values, beliefs and thereby actions. The stories can open people’s eyes to a way of thinking that has not been considered before, challenge a preconceived notion of the past, or a vision of the future that had not been envisioned as possible. As a sector which is viewed as imbued with creativity and cultural values, rather than purely financial motivations, the cultural sector’s stories maintain the trust of people and society.
    Go toThis post comes to you from Culture|Futures

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    Bedlam Theatre Wins Venue Sustainability Prize

    This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

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    Bedlam Theatre has taken the :entertaining sustainability Award for Venue Sustainability at the inaugural Technical Theatre Awards, presented at a ceremony held in October at the annual PLASA London live entertainment technology show at the ExCeL.

    Charlotte Hodge, Bedlam’s Theatre Manager, collecting the Award on behalf of the student-led venue in Edinburgh, said, “Receiving this award is a huge honour for Bedlam. We feel that sustainability is so important to the future of theatre as a whole. We have many ideas on how to improve but as a student-run theatre company we don’t necessarily have the professional experience or the funds to know where to make a start on them. That is why this award is so important to us: it rewards our enthusiasm and our drive to make changes with the resources we have. This award will help us in our mission to make Bedlam Theatre a more sustainable venue for future members.”

    Hodge continued, “Thanks must go to Edinburgh University and the Edinburgh University Students’ Association for their support; to Creative Carbon Scotland and Harry Giles of Festivals Edinburgh for their advice; and to the many Bedlam members who have got us to this point, in particular Luciana Miu, Adam Alton, Bryn Jones and Ruth Luckins.” Tim Atkinson, Technical Director of :entertaining sustainability, the award sponsor, said, “Bedlam Theatre’s team demonstrates once again that it is perfectly feasible to present uncompromising and exciting live entertainment whilst continually innovating and experimenting to reduce the residual impact of its operations”.

    Atkinson went on, “By experimenting with initiatives such as electronic programmes, and collaborating with organisations such as Creative Carbon Scotland, Bedlam repeatedly pushes the envelope of what is achievable within their parameters. Most importantly, the team communicates their work with their audience – a crucial engagement – and with so many patrons at each performance, their message spreads quickly beyond the walls. Huge congratulations to them all.”

    The Technical Theatre Awards has been established to recognise the achievements of backstage staff in production, and was given considerable industry support, not only by its host, Tony and Olivier Award-winning lighting designer and former chairman of the Association of Lighting Designers, Rick Fisher, but by the industry sponsors who supported each award.

    The full list of winners is: Paul Arditti, dBS Award for Outstanding Achivement in Sound; Tim Routledge, Philips Entertainment Award for Outstanding Achievement in Lighting; Ben Philips, AVW Award for Outstanding Achievement in Automation; Jonathan Hall, StageBitz Award for Outstanding Achievement in Prop Making; Chris Layton, PRG Award for Outstanding Achievement in Education; Megan Cassidy, IOGIG Ltd Award for Outstanding Achievement in Wardrobe; Adam Searle, Load Cell Rental Award for Outstanding Achievement in Flys and Rigging; Stefan Musch, The Theatres Trust Award for Outstanding Achievement in Wigs and Makeup; Sadler’s Wells, Spotlight Accounting Award for Receiving Venue of the Year; Autograph Sound, AdVision Hire Company of the Year Award; Janet Williamson, Triple E Award for Outstanding Achievement in Building and Set Construction; Richard Bullimore, Lighting and Sound International Award for Outstanding Achievement in Production Management; Bedlam Theatre, :entertaining sustainability Award for Venue Sustainability.

    For more information visit www.entertainingsustainability.com

    Image: Charlotte Hodge, 2013-2014 Theatre Manager of Bedlam Theatre, collected the award hosted by Tim Atkinson and Rick Fisher

    The post Bedlam Theatre Wins Venue Sustainability Prize appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

     

    Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

    In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

    We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

    Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

    Changing their own behaviour;
    Communicating with their audiences;
    Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

    Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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    Tiny Geographies by Chris Dooks

    This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

    Artist Chris Dooks has worked in 4 key locations, producing 4 short films of each area for Atomic Doric http://www.woodendbarn.com/atomic-doric/. He has interviewed different people who connect with the places – young nature groups, walkers, rangers etc – recording sounds, photographing and filming with them.

    Tiny Geographies has created several hours of material including interviews and photographs, field recordings and more. Watch the trailer here:

    The film premieres Friday 29 November 2013, 7:30pm at Woodend Barn with support from Edinburgh’s Drew Wright aka Wounded Knee.

    Morag McFarclane (69) author of idiosyncratic text ‘The Aberdeenshire Field Book of The Exhausted Artist’ [Wodebooks 1971] writes in the written programme which accompanies this film:

    This short trailer previews artist Chris Dooks’ [near feature-length] Year of Natural Scotland commission “Tiny Geographies” – a project managed by Woodend Barn in Banchory, Aberdeenshire as part of the ‘Atomic Doric’ season of commissioned works by artists and musicians.

    The experimental ethos of the film was to ascertain to what degree could diverse audiovisual footage be gathered from several accessible environments just a few square metres in size. These ‘tiny’ geographies were made to see if there was any advantage to being unable to scale a ‘Munro’ or even a small hill – and try and make the best of out limited energy.

    Using DSLR-sourced montages alongside the latest fangled GoPro camcorder [shooting at high speed], with microphones and hydrophones, Dooks employs the technology as friend of the ‘exhausted practitioner’ to spy, scope-out and mine the environment without touching it – or as Chris says ‘the only thing I like to shoot a deer with, is a Nikon lens.’

    Inspired by photographer David Liittschwager’s ‘One Cubic Foot’ nature project (see tinyurl.com/onecubic) – the project is about depth over breadth and results in neither a ‘disability’ project nor a film about the extremes of exploring the wilderness. It’s about everyday people and everyday landscapes, but once peered into, there’s nothing everyday about either.

    Over two months, digital montages of the areas were shot to a soundtrack sourced from over forty interviews with the public across national parks, reserves and estates in Aberdeenshire. Questions were asked of willing interviewees to use their answers as musical and regional source material. This large degree of public engagement has resulted in a work resembling something between a kind of sensory documentary and a suite or ‘movements’ akin to seasonal changes in the environment or a kind of extended overture to a particular (even peculiar) slice of Scotland.

    A thin sliver of Chris’s personal life also makes it into the final cut not just because of the ease of clearing images of people and woodland wanderers, but also because this is not a cold ethnographic study of accents and hills.

    Five areas were chosen, each a few miles from each other (and one fifty miles further) where the different technologies are part of this beautifully strange world.

    The film was shot primarily over Aberdeenshire; Glen Tanar Estate near Aboyne, The Linn of Quioch near Braemar, Tomnaverie Stone Circle near Tarland, Muir of Dinnet National Nature Reserve near Dinnet and St Cyrus National Nature Reserve near Montrose.

    TINY GEOGRAPHIES WAS FUNDED BY:

    Creative Scotland

    Aberdeenshire Council: Be Part of the Picture

    Visit Scotland

    Project managed by Woodend Barn, Banchory

    with support from Discover Royal Deeside and Cairngorms

    ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK AVAILABLE FROM

    chrisdooks.bandcamp.com

    from December 2013

    woodendbarn.co.uk

    dooks.org

    idioholism.com

    All material © Chris Dooks 2013

    ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
    It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
    Go to EcoArtScotland

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    Australian seminar: ‘Galleries, museums and climate change’

    This post comes to you from Culture|Futures

    Australian seminar: ‘Galleries, museums and climate change’

    The title ‘Galleries, Museums & Climate Change’ pretty well indicates the agenda for what the participants of a one-day seminar held at the University of Queensland Art Museum in Australia discussed and shared knowledge about on 13 November 2013: a cocktail of energy efficiency, sustainability, climate change – and culture.

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    “The seminar looks at new approaches to environmental collection management protocols, lighting and sustainability. It also looks at ways in which our sector can educate and engage our audiences in issues of environmental sustainability and energy efficiency,” explained Executive Director of Museum & Gallery Services Queensland, Rebekah Butler.

    Museum & Gallery Services Queensland – the peak professional body for the public museum and gallery sector in the Australian state Queensland – has organised the seminar in partnership with the University of Queensland Art Museum and the UQ Museum Studies.

    Judith Nesbitt from Tate in United Kingdom led the discussion, speaking on the innovative work of this international cultural institution to reduce its carbon emissions and embed environmental sustainability across all areas of the organisation’s policy and practice. This includes building and exhibition design, through to the Tate’s catering and retail outlets.

    Environmental sustainability at Tate

    Judith Nesbitt is Head of National and International Partnerships at Tate in United Kingdom, and she leads Tate’s Sustainability Task Force with the aim of reducing the organisation’s carbon emissions and embedding environmental sustainability in policy and practice.

    At the seminar, Judith Nesbitt gave a keynote speech on Environmental Sustainability at the Tate, and in the publicity material for the seminar, she gave a description of Tate’s efforts to reduce its environmental impact. She writes:

    “For over five years, Tate has made a concerted effort to reduce its environmental impact and worked with colleagues in the museum sector to address the challenges specific to the sector.”

    “This initiative has brought changes to how it cares for, presents and transports its collection, the operations across its varied estate, the design and engineering of its new buildings. Some of these changes are incremental; other changes require a greater shift, whether in practice or attitude. Staff, audiences, and artists all have a part to play in how we develop imaginative solutions to the environmental challenges of the 21st century.

    Like many galleries, Tate has achieved reductions in the energy demand of heating and cooling its buildings, and taken the opportunity presented by capital projects, such as expansion of Tate Modern, to achieve energy efficient design through passive measures, maximising natural lighting and developing the use of LEDs.

    All aspects of gallery practice are systematically examined, from re-usable wall systems for exhibitions, waste to heat contracts, to sustainable catering and trading. Aiming to embed sustainable practices across the organisation, Tate’s environmental strategy is championed by Green Reps, overseen by the Sustainability Task Force, regularly assessed by Trustees and detailed in its annual report.

    The effort is not just an organisational one, since many of the most far-reaching changes require sector-wide agreement between lending institutions. Many international colleagues have indicated their readiness to adopt a smarter approach to running galleries and museums in the long-term public interest. Sharing experience and data is the first step towards well-founded changes of practice, which is why this seminar is a welcome opportunity.”

    Source: magsq.com.au

    No international agreement on parameters

    How to reduce energy consumption without compromising the preservation of collections is an important and unresolved question with no consensus among museums which aim to manage the environmental parameters in the face of climate change.

    “Relaxed environmental conditions for museums to reduce energy consumption, whilst not compromising the preservation of collections, have been on the table for consideration by the conservation community for at least the last five years. It is acknowledged that existing parameters are based on a blanket approach, and are unnecessarily tight for all but the most vulnerable of artworks.

    Major museums and galleries worldwide are recognising this and implementing relaxed parameters, such as the Tate, the Smithsonian and the V&A.

    Two years ago it looked as though international agreement was close. However a significant proportion of the conservation profession are not convinced that the risks in relaxing these parameters can be safely managed. Accordingly consensus amongst conservators internationally is not going to be achieved and therefore there will be no new blanket environmental standards.”

    Curating Cities

    Public art and sustainability in urban environments
    Dr Laura Fisher from the National Institute for Experimental Arts spoke on the Linkage project Curating Cities. Led by researchers at the National Institute for Experimental Arts (COFA) in partnership with the City of Sydney, Carbon Arts, Object, and the University of Cincinnati, Curating Cities examines how the arts can generate environmentally beneficial behavior change and influence the development of green infrastructure in urban environments.

    Over the last year Laura Fisher has been involved in building the Curating Cities database of eco-sustainable public art, which is a resource for researchers, artists, commissioning agencies, government bodies and members of the public who are interested in how public art can generate beneficial social change with respect to environmental sustainability.

    “Curating Cities rests on the conviction that public art can very effectively serve the sustainability agenda if it is integrated into the processes of reshaping urban infrastructure and managing the efficient use of resources in cities. This presentation will explain the aspirations that underpin Curating Cities, and discuss several exemplary public art projects that have been documented on the Curating Cities database of eco-sustainable art.

    It will also discuss the database’s purpose as an informative and evaluative resource that documents the mix of aesthetic, civic and environmental concerns that each work seeks to address, and provides useful insights into the funding arrangements, multi-party negotiations and problem-solving processes that bring public art projects to fruition.”

    curatingcities.org

    Contemporary art meets the environment: Artists Janet Laurence and Caroline Rothwell discussed their work on display in the UQ Art Museum. The artists talked about how they make visible the interconnections between nature and culture, and elaborate the devastating impact of human action on the environment.

    Emrah Baki Ulas, lighting designer, educator and researcher, Associate at Steensen-Varming and co-author of ‘The Technical Industry Report on Museum and Gallery Lighting and Air Conditioning’ spoke on future options for economically and environmentally sustainable methods of display environments, preservation and storage of art and cultural material.

    Showcase: As an environmental sustainable showcase the seminar took the participants on a tour of University of Queensland’s Global Change Institute building.

    » Media release about the seminar: MRGalleriesMuseums Climate.pdf

    Our Carbon Footprint

    In August 2011, M&GSQ held a state conference which had a plenary entitled ‘Our Carbon Footprint’.

    Slideshows and videos of presentations from this plenary session, such as Guy Abrahams’ CLIMARTE presentation ‘Climate Change, Sustainability and the Arts’ (video | powerpoint-document) are available online.
    » Learn more on magsq.com.au

    Culture|Futures is an international collaboration of organizations and individuals who are concerned with shaping and delivering a proactive cultural agenda to support the necessary transition towards an Ecological Age by 2050.

    The Cultural sector that we refer to is an interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral, inter-genre collaboration, which encompasses policy-making, intercultural dialogue/cultural relations, creative cities/cultural planning, creative industries and research and development. It is those decision-makers and practitioners who can reach people in a direct way, through diverse messages and mediums.

    Affecting the thinking and behaviour of people and communities is about the dissemination of stories which will profoundly impact cultural values, beliefs and thereby actions. The stories can open people’s eyes to a way of thinking that has not been considered before, challenge a preconceived notion of the past, or a vision of the future that had not been envisioned as possible. As a sector which is viewed as imbued with creativity and cultural values, rather than purely financial motivations, the cultural sector’s stories maintain the trust of people and society.
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    Tree Days for Fife Primary Schools with FCA&C

    This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

    FCAC-Artists-Jonathan-Baxter-+-Sarah-Gittins

    Fife Contemporary Art and Craft recently got in touch to tell us about the culmination of their art and sustainability exhibition ‘The Kingdom of If’ which has been travelling across Fife in MAC, the region’s mobile art coach for the past 18 months.

    Red Devil or Bloody Ploughman anyone? These colourful names are in fact varieties of apple! They will be part of a selection of apple, pear and plum trees being distributed to 14 primary schools across Fife from 19-21 November as part of 3 Tree Days to celebrate Scottish orchards and mark the culmination of Fife Contemporary Art & Craft’s eighteen month long, art & sustainability exhibition, ‘The Kingdom of If’, on board MAC, Fife’s mobile arts coach.

    Curator of the exhibition, artist Jonathan Baxter, and fellow Fife based artist Sarah Gittins are both involved with DUO, Dundee Urban Orchard, an art and horticultural project in Dundee. For ‘Kingdom of If’, they’ve again combined their horticultural and artistic knowledge with an interest in sustainable living. It therefore seemed appropriate to bring the project to a close by off-setting the carbon emissions (over 10 years) caused by MAC travelling around Fife during the exhibition’s 18 month duration by planting fruit trees.

    As primary schools in Fife are one of the main target groups for MAC, fruit trees were offered to schools who could give them a good home. At all the participating schools the trees will be cared for by their eco-schools’ committee or gardening club, or a specific class has been tasked with the responsibility as part of a larger project. When Jonathan and Sarah visit each school in November to deliver the trees, they will also talk to the pupils about the environmental importance of planting trees, the biodiversity of orchards, and also how to care for their trees.

    In the last decade or so, Fife has seen a welcome revival of interest in its orchard heritage. As a result of the Tree Days, overall 8 mini orchards in Fife primary schools will either be created from scratch or augmented which can surely be seen as a significant addition to this burgeoning orchard ‘scene’ in Fife. It is also hoped that while the exhibition will have come to an end, its legacy in the form of fruit trees will continue for much longer.

    FCA&C gratefully acknowledges support for Tree Days from the Forth Environment Link and the Central Scotland Green Network Development Fund 2013, and Forestry Commission Scotland. ‘Kingdom of If’ is supported by Museums Galleries Scotland. (The Forth Valley Orchard Initiative is funded by the Central Scotland Green Network Development Fund. The Central Scotland Green Network Orchard Grant Scheme 2013/2014, which is part of the initiative, covers the whole of the CSGN area.)

    The post Tree Days for Fife Primary Schools with FCA&C appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

     

    Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

    In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

    We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

    Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

    Changing their own behaviour;
    Communicating with their audiences;
    Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

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