Monthly Archives: October 2014

Telling the Climate Change Story

This post comes from the Artists and Climate Change Blog

There are many ways to tell the climate change story. It can be told in numbers organized in charts or graphs – the tools preferred by scientists. Or it can be told in a myriad of artistic ways as evidenced by the categories on this blog. For painter and photographer Diane Burko, the climate change story is best told in large-scale images that capture both the majesty of the depicted subject, and the poignancy of its potential demise. Inspired by the science of climate change, Burko’s paintings and photographs invite us to revere what we have, and to understand that despite its magnitude and seemingly unlimited resources, our earth is at risk and requires as much nurturing from us as we do from it. The merging of the aesthetic and the rational in a single experience invites us to confront our own understanding of, and response to, climate change.

In the interview below, Burko talks about her two current projects: Politics of Snow and Polar Investigations. For more on these projects, see also this excellent post on the World Policy Institute Blog.

You have had a long and successful career as a landscape painter but recently, you shifted your focus. Can you talk about your Politics of Snow and Polar Investigations projects?

That shift happened in 2006 while giving a talk about my exhibition at the Michener Museum. The curator, Amy Schlegel, included a piece from 1976 about the French Alps ice amongst recent paintings of volcanoes and Iceland waterfalls. Seeing that large acrylic painting was my epiphany…

Was the snow was still there, I wondered… This was the same year Al Gore’s movie An Inconvenient Truth and Elizabeth Kolbert’s book Field Notes From A Catastrophe came out. Issues of climate change were in the air. I began seriously learning how the landscape (my lifelong subject) was being impacted by fossil fuels. There was no turning back – I no longer was satisfied with just creating images about the beauty of our environment. The more I researched, the more I realized I had to do something about it.

My project Politics of Snow was the answer. I began developing visual strategies to tell the climate change story. For about the first three years, I made paintings based on geological source material like repeat photography and recessional maps contributed by scientists from around the world. My practice prior to this was always based on personal engagement with an environment. However, with this body of work, my sources were primarily historical as I created large canvases tracking glacial degradation.

Qori Kalis

Qori Kalis, Peru, 1983-2009, after Henry Brecher, 60”x108”, 2009

Polar Investigations began in 2013 when I finally was able to witness first hand the impact of climate change. I have participated in expeditions to both the South and North Poles, thus again engaging personally with the landscape. In January 2013, I traveled to the Antarctic Peninsula, Elephant Island and South Georgia. In September/October, I joined 25 other artists on a residency in the Arctic Circle, sailing around Svalbard, 10 degrees below the North Pole and 400 miles north of Norway. I also joined a team of glaciologists in Ny-Alesund flying to Kronebreen and Kongsvegen Glaciers. This past August, I witnessed the fastest moving glacier in the Northern hemisphere: Ilulissat in Greenland. I plan to be back in Antarctica and Argentina’s southern Patagonia ice field this December through January 2015.

Ilulissat Fjord

At Ilulissat Fjord this August, 2014

How does the world of science inspire your art practice? 

I have always been “science curious.” I love to understand how and why things happen, particularly when it comes to the earth. I have realized in retrospect that most of the monumental landscapes I have sought throughout my career – like the Grand Canyon, volcanoes and now glaciers – are dramatically impacted by some geological phenomena. The stark difference, however, with my Polar Investigations project, is that glaciers like those in Glacier National Park are not naturally receding the way they have for thousands of years. Now the melt is so accelerated that the 150 glaciers counted in 1850 have been reduced to barely 25!

Grinnell Mt. Gould

Grinnell Mt. Gould, 1938, 1981, 1998, 2006, 88” x 200”, 2009

It is no longer Nature but Human Nature impacting our planet. Our use of fossil fuels has altered the balance…. Unprecedented extreme weather, droughts, floods and extinctions are the hallmarks of our Anthropocene era.

I have been fortunate over the years to connect with a number of scientists who appreciate how my work communicates science. Those relationships have led to my participation on panels at the American Geophysical Union, the Geological Society of America, the National Academy of Sciences and an affiliation with the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, where I am headed in two weeks to meet with a number of glaciologists, collect more visual data and lead a seminar.

Aside from all the personal conversations and data research, being in the field is the ultimate inspiration. The act of bearing witness to the vastness and magic of the polar regions is so special, but the privilege to observe scientists in the act of actually gathering their data is absolutely priceless!

What do you hope to communicate to viewers who encounter your work?

The alarm I feel about the future of our planet, the urgency to act. But it has to first be communicated through the actual painting and photography about the landscape. I want to seduce the audience with the inherent beauty I am depicting as well as remind them of its possible demise. The challenge is to meld those two goals. I never want the narrative to dominate – I want it implied.

What is the single most important thing artists can do to address the problem of climate change?

They have to find a way to address their concerns in the most honest and authentic voice possible through their practice.

It’s not always an easy task….

Of course, aside from our studio work, I believe it is incumbent upon us to be socially engaged. I was elated to participate with some 400,000 other concerned citizens last month as we joined in the People’s Climate March in Manhattan, New York. I also think, if one is able to, that we should participate in outreach activities, and speak out as concerned artists for the preservation of our planet Earth.

What gives you hope?

The march on September 21 was an incredibly inspiring experience for me. Being there with 400,00 people all saying its time, the debate is over, we need our leaders to finally make concrete policy decisions.

I also find it hopeful that this is a central issue for many artists working in many different mediums – there are increasing numbers of exhibitions, plays, and poems about our environment. I see a growing number of newspaper and magazine articles (I clip them), and a general increase on the topic in all media outlets – including this very active blog you have created. Thank you for that!

FEATURED IMAGE:  Grandes Jorasses, 64” x 108”, 1976

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Enter to Win the BGA College Green Captain Prize for Achievement in Greener Theatre

This post comes to you from the Broadway Green Alliance

As you saw in the last edition of Sightlines, the Broadway Green Alliance has launched a new prize to reward College Green Captains for their greening efforts on campus productions. They have now shared details of the requirements and the deadline.  To apply for the prize, College Green Captains should submit a one-page summary statement explaining their greening efforts and a pdf of a 18″x 24″ cardboard poster showing off the best elements of their greening program. Additional documentation can include a 3-5 minute video or up to 10 pages of written reports or spreadsheets documenting the greening.  Photographs with captions explaining the greening program are encouraged.  Winners will have brought innovative, creative, and/or widely-applied greening and energy-efficiency methods into the design and/or production of theatre at their campus.  The posters of finalists will be displayed at the BGA booth at the USITT Expo in March.

Greener practices can involve – but are not limited to – designing theatrical productions in a greener manner (e.g. alternate materials, energy, lighting, costumes or set pieces); running the show in a greener manner (e.g. energy-efficient lighting, rechargeable batteries, or educating the cast and crew about better practices); striking the production in a way that reduces waste (e.g. re-use, recycling, or composting); or changing front-of-house operations to reduce waste and encourage greener audience practices (e.g. alternative advertising, programs, or tickets).

Entries are due by March 1, 2015 and a winner will be announced at the USITT conference in Cincinnati.  Entries can be sent to green@broadway.org. Though groups can apply, only two people in the group are eligible for the tickets to a Broadway or touring show (WICKED or LION KING) and the professional backstage tour.  The entire group will receive a plaque commemorating their win.  Any student or faculty/staff member interested in helping to green their theatre department is encouraged to volunteer to be a College Green Captain and to sign up at  BroadwayGreen.com/college-green-captains. All prize applicants must be College Green Captains. The Broadway Green Alliance is also inaugurating a Green Production Design Award at SETC (Southeastern Theatre Conference) in March, 2015.

More information about the BGA and the Prize for Achievement in Greener Theatre:

The BGA College Green Captain program is modeled on the successful BGA Broadway Green Captain program, in which a cast or crew member of every Broadway production volunteers to serve as a BGA liaison/go-to member of the production for all things green/environmentally friendlier.  College Green Captains are self-selected members of a college or university theatre department who are committed to greening one or more of the department’s productions.  The BGA provides a kit of better practices, sample timelines, and links to resources and professionals to educate college Green Captains about how to green their productions.  The College Green Captain program works best when there are one or more student Green Captains and a faculty or staff Green Captain to ensure continuity of the greener practices. This faculty or staff Green Captain is the likely person to nominate one or more student Green Captains for this award.

The BGA seeks to encourage artistic growth and the highest standards of excellence in theatre, while including a growing commitment to resource and energy efficiency, reduced toxicity, and environmentally friendlier practices in the design, production, running, and striking of a college production.  We are creating this award to recognize and encourage outstanding BGA College Green Captains for college theatrical productions.

Winners will have brought innovative, creative, and/or widely-applied greening and energy-efficiency methods into the design and/or production of theatre at their campus.

Greener practices can involve – but are not limited to – designing theatrical productions in a greener manner (e.g. alternate materials, energy, lighting, costumes or set pieces); running the show in a greener manner (e.g. energy-efficient lighting, rechargeable batteries, or educating the cast and crew about better practices); striking the production in a way that reduces waste (e.g. re-use, recycling, or composting); or changing front-of-house operations to reduce waste and encourage greener audience practices (e.g. alternative advertising, programs, or tickets).

In short, this award seeks to

  • champion those students whose dedication and commitment to greening help lead their college theatre productions to be more environmentally friendly;
  • recognize, and celebrate the greener changes brought to theatre productions produced in university and college theater programs;
  • encourage colleges and universities to research, invest in, and put into practice more environmentally friendly pre-, post-, and production practices in theatre.

The winner of the BGA College Green Captain award will receive tickets to the Broadway or touring production of either WICKED or LION KING along with a professional backstage tour of the production and a meeting with a current Broadway Green Captain, subject to availability.

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The Broadway Green Alliance was founded in 2008 in collaboration with the Natural Resources Defense Council. The Broadway Green Alliance (BGA) is an ad hoc committee of The Broadway League and a fiscal program of Broadway Cares/Equity Fights Aids. Along with Julie’s Bicycle in the UK, the BGA is a founding member of the International Green Theatre Alliance. The BGA has reached tens of thousands of fans through Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other media.

At the BGA, we recognize that it is impossible to be 100% “green” while continuing activity and – as there is no litmus test for green activity – we ask instead that our members commit to being greener and doing better each day. As climate change does not result from one large negative action, but rather from the cumulative effect of billions of small actions, progress comes from millions of us doing a bit better each day. To become a member of the Broadway Green Alliance we ask only that you commit to becoming greener, that you name a point person to be our liaison, and that you will tell us about your green-er journey.

The BGA is co-chaired by Susan Sampliner, Company Manager of the Broadway company of WICKED, and Charlie Deull, Executive Vice President at Clark Transfer<. Rebekah Sale is the BGA’s full-time Coordinator.

Go to the Broadway Green Alliance

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Green Arts Portal Bi-weekly Reminders

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The Green Arts Portal (GAP) is an online resource that enables organisations and individuals to track their progress towards sustainability milestones. Our launch of bi-weekly reminders will serve to support and remind GAP users of the many facets of the online tool.

The bi-weekly reminders will be structured around themes, ranging from waste management to marketing. Our first theme is “Green Champions,” which celebrates staff members who take the lead on setting and achieving sustainability goals for their organisation. Our new resource “Being a Green Champion” elaborates on the role and strategies implemented by successful green champions. The resource advises-

  • How to become a green champion
  • What your first steps as a green champion should be
  • Communicating initiatives towards green goals
  • Measuring your progress through the Green Arts Portal

If you would like to sign up to the Green Arts Portal, please get in touch. If you are already signed up for the Green Arts Portal, be sure to check your email inbox for our bi-weekly reminders!

The post Green Arts Portal Bi-weekly Reminders appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Edinburgh Art Festival & Edinburgh College of Art Study Day Reflections

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Ben Twist, director of Creative Carbon Scotland, led a discussion that explored various artistic and curatorial conflicts that might occur when considering sustainability – particularly those concerning the transportation of artworks across the world, and as part of international exhibitions. These conflicts were discussed in the real-life context of the Where Do I End And You Begin exhibition at the City Art Centre: commissioned as part of the 2014 Edinburgh Art Festival.

The group of 70 Edinburgh College of Art students were encouraged to reflect on the challenges  curators or artists may face when designing a commissioned exhibition of a similar scale. In this, they were able to explore the various pressures, concerns and opportunities resultant from the inclusion of sustainability at each point of exhibition design.

One of the examples discussed wasthe multimedia work, The Sovereign Forest by Amar Kanwar, and the choices relating to its exhibition space. As the work was too extensive for the City Art Centre, it was instead exhibited in the Old Royal High School – a highly relevant site to the sovereignty and government themes of the work– although a removed site from the initial exhibition. Students were asked to think through the financial, environmental and organisational costs of this decision, and reason their own choice of venue. Different groups within the ECA collective provided contrasting decisions, with those for the change of venue citing the extra costs as necessary to showcase the work to its full scale and effect. However, it was also proposed that instead the work should be shown in a location more pre-disposed to the multimedia set up (such as a cinema), though at a diminished scale.

We also heard from Sorcha Carey, director of the Edinburgh Art Festival, as to why the decision to host the work at the Royal High School was made. Sorcha explained that the experience of the viewer, and the richness or clarity of viewing the entire work in an appropriate space, was balanced against the cost associated with hosting another building. She also went on to highlight the social reasons for using the building, which is largely otherwise inaccessible to the public, and soon to become a commercial property. In considering that reopening of Edinburgh sites, like the Old Royal High School, to the public is a significant aim of the festival, we were able to appreciate the use of an already constructed environment and exhibit enriching the location outside of the festival:

“There is something bigger happening than the artwork”.

Kay Hassan, My Father’s Music Room, 2007-2008, mixed media, installation view

Also very present in the discussion was the idea of the integrity of an artwork, and how this might be impacted by measures taken to affect the environmental sustainability of its exhibition. The group discussed Johannesburg-based Kay Hassan’s installation piece My Father’s Music Room, in which Hassan comments on contemporary South African society through a mix of mediums, including a large selection of vinyl records. An inconclusive vote as to whether the work could have been recreated in Scotland (with the same records sourced in Scottish music and charity shops) highlighted how we value origin and authenticity when it comes to art. Many expressed how the artwork would be altered if its components were sourced differently, with Sorcha emphasising the generational significance of the records owned and traded in South Africa: a collective history evidenced through the work. Curator Jane Connarty also challenged us to consider how the work may have differed if produced during a residency in Scotland, and how the site of artwork creation can impact an exhibited product.

As the discussion developed, it became clear that carbon emissions and sustainability is another concern to be considered by curators and artists, but one which must be equated with practical, technical, spatial and aesthetic concerns. As artist and curator Kathleen Ritter highlighted, often the budget of an exhibition is its biggest constraint, but also potentially its biggest incentive to reconsider curatorial design and transportation of works – both which have a major impact on the environmental sustainability of the final exhibition. Ultimately, it is only in the decision to treat each work individually, and to develop compromises between the artist, the curatorial vison and the limiting factors, that the environmental impact of international exhibitions will be reduced.


Images:
Amar Kanwar, The Scene of Crime, 2011. Photograph by Stuart Armitt.
Kay Hassan, My Father’s Music Room, 2007-2008, mixed media, installation view.

Creative Carbon Scotland has been working with Edinburgh Art Festival and their Where do I end and you begin exhibition to better understand the environmental impact of large scale and international visual arts exhibitions. Click here to find out more about the project.

The post Edinburgh Art Festival & Edinburgh College of Art Study Day Reflections appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene Seminar

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Open call for participation in an Art in the Age of the Anthropocene seminar to be held at Translocal Institute October-December 2014.   

This autumn Translocal Institute launches the Experimental Reading Room, an ongoing series of public seminars and guest lectures on art and ecology, the first of which focuses on Art in the Age of the Anthropocene.  A number of places are available for the seminar group and those wishing to participate are invited to send a short motivation letter to the organisers. The group will meet on alternate Mondays beginning on 20 October to discuss key texts about the anthropocene and its paradigm-shifting implications for art and society.

Referring to the geological epoch in which we live, the anthropocene, or era of humankind, is based on the understanding that humans, as a single species, are in charge of the whole planet, causing global environmental change. The realisation that we have become geological agents with the power to alter the most basic physical processes of the planet has wide-reaching consequences for economics, society, politics, culture, as well as art. Considering the anthropocene as a transformative concept for environmental art history, sustainable art systems and green curating, this seminar will also approach the topic from a specific Central European position.

The Art in the Age of the Anthropocene seminar is led by Drs Maja and Reuben Fowkes and organised in cooperation with the Academy of Fine Arts Budapest as part of Translocal Institute’s Experimental Reading Room project 2014-16. The Experimental Reading Room creates a space to interact, experiment, learn and dream our way to a new orientation towards ecological empathy in contemporary art and society. Based around a parallel program of degrowth lectures by prominent international thinkers and thematic study circles, the project is designed to engender the self-production of socially-embedded, theoretically-informed and practically-oriented knowledge in the vital field of art and ecology.

Translocal are partners of the Green Art Lab Alliance network (GALA) of which Creative Carbon Scotland is also a partner.

Supported by:

The post Opportunity: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene Seminar appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Apply to reSOURCE at GSA

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Running from October 2014 to February 2015, reSOURCE seeks applications from 10 students at the Glasgow School of Art and 5 artists/designers/architects from Glasgow’s greater creative community. reSOURCE will be facilitated by members of the GSA Sustainability team and is a process that will assist participants to develop an understanding of the environmental impact of their work.

Through this we hope to stimulate and inspire creative practitioners to become conscious of the carbon footprint associated with, in particular, materials choices. Practitioners are invited to submit a current or future project which could go through the reSOURCE process. This process will involve; the development and use of a materials specific carbon calculator, the documentation of materials used, reSOURCE discussion groups and, a final exhibition of the project which will be funded by ARC.

Participants will receive at stipend of £ 100 for the four month project. In order to receive this funding participants are asked to: submit monthly log tables and carbon calculations, attend the monthly meetings and, to contribute their work with carbon documentation to a final exhibition held in March 2015.


For more information about this opportunity and to apply, please visit the reSOURCE page at the Glasgow School of Art website.

The post Opportunity: Apply to reSOURCE at GSA appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Grant Opportunity from Action Earth

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

CSV’s Action Earth campaign is helping to get people and communities busy outdoors. We have grants to give to groups of volunteers who are carrying out environmental projects in Scotland. The campaign runs until February 2015.

  • Grants from £50 to £250 are available for practical activities that involve volunteers in improving outdoor spaces or creating habitats for wildlife. Grants can be used to purchase plants, tools and materials or to cover volunteer expenses.
  • If your group is volunteering on a Local Nature Reserve we can give you up to £500 for practical work, wildlife recording or educational activities that encourage more people onto the reserve.

If you have any questions contact Robert Henderson at actionearth@csv.org.uk or call 0131 222 9083 / 622 7766.

For more information and to apply online go to: http://actionearth.csv.org.uk

This project is supported by Scottish Natural Heritage

The post Grant Opportunity from Action Earth appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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The Land Institute Prairie Festival 2014

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

Since moving to the Midwest last summer in 2013, I’ve been searching out organizations that are focused on art and agriculture. Upon my arrival, ecological art scholar, Suzaan Boettger in New York City, told me to go to the Prairie Festival, which is an annual gathering, an “intellectual hootenanny,” organized by The Land Institute in Salina, Kansas. Its founder, Wes Jackson, has been inviting global innovators to speak addressing land conservation and food issues for 36 years. Jackson proposed the development of a perennial polyculture in 1978.

Speakers are not allowed to bring slide/powerpoint presentations and are asked to talk to attendees, typically around 1,000, although this year was around 700, with words only. It felt like a Midwest prairie version of a Chatquaqua and at times like a church sermon addressing land issues. In fact, this year, the last weekend of September, Wes invited several speakers to address religion and land ethics, to examine a more spiritual approach to living sustainably on the land/Earth.

Although I was interested in the spiritual aspects of our relationship with the land, I was most impressed with Kristine McDivitt Tompkins and her husband Douglas Tompkins, who together have managed to purchase over two million acres of land in Chile and Argentina and turn it into a National Park. After all these years of attending Bioneers conferences and other ecological restoration gatherings, I had never laid eyes on these two and only heard stories about what they were doing in South America. And, although Kristine was frustrated not to be able to share images of their preservation efforts—parkland—her words were powerful and made me realize that we really need to acknowledge people like these two pioneers who took their hundreds of millions of dollars and did something lasting with it.

Kristine and Douglas who are very competitive by nature, both highly successful business people—she the former CEO of Patagonia and he the former owner of North Face and co-owner of former Esprit—made it their game to give back to the Earth rather than take away from it. The images she wanted to share of the parkland became secondary to the testament of their character, sharing how they decided to do something bigger (or more spiritual?) with what money can buy.

Needless to say, I would highly recommend this event to those who want to experience a more understated like-minded gathering, not a commerical hoopla with booths selling products. The food was amazing, including bread made from Kernza flour from the Institute lands and Saturday night chili, both vegetarian and bison, were so yummy I wanted seconds (but no, they don’t do that). My only complaint!

Each year the Institute features one artist who creates an installation in the adjacent buildings next to the main lecture barn. This year A. Mary Kay who teaches at Bethany College in Kansas was selected. The artist was also recently included in the State of the Art exhibition at Crystal Bridges Museum of Art in Bentonville, Arkansas this fall. More HERE

For more information, go to The Land Institute Prairie Festival 2014!

See you there next year….. Patricia Watts

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ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Open Call: World Conference on Ecological Restoration

This post comes to you from Cultura21

ser2015Proposals are now invited for symposia, workshops and training courses for the 6th World Conference on Ecological Restoration. The deadline for submitting a proposal is Friday 12th December 2014, however early submissions are encouraged and proposals will be considered in the order they are received.  All proposals should be submitted using the online form. Detailed instructions for submitting symposia and workshop proposals are provided below, along with a link to the submission form.  If you would like to submit a proposal for a pre-conference training course, please CLICK HERE.

Symposia

Symposia are held concurrently with the regular sessions of the SER 2015 scientific programme and provide a forum for the exploration and discussion of special topics or themes in the field of ecological restoration and related areas of inquiry.  Organisers can structure a symposium around a series of formal oral presentations or a moderated panel discussion and are expected to focus on new research results, cutting-edge developments and novel ideas as they relate to the social, economic and ecological aspects of restoration.  Symposia should strive for a synthesis of the topic or issue being explored, rather than merely presenting a set of related case studies.  Ideally, symposia are intended to expand cooperation, understanding and interdisciplinary camaraderie in the main thematic areas of the conference.  SER especially welcomes symposia organised by two or more scientists or practitioners from different countries or regions, as well as those that include presenters representing a diversity of backgrounds and sub-disciplines.  All accepted symposia will be allocated one 90 minute time slot during the scientific programme, and in rare cases, may be granted two consecutive slots at the Programme Committee’s discretion.  A symposium should have a minimum of 4 speakers and a maximum of 5 speakers.

Organisers are encouraged to consider publishing the outcomes of their symposia and organisers who can demonstrate a published outcome will be viewed favourably by the Scientific Committee.  It is the organisers’ responsibility to ensure that they liaise with their appointed publisher.

Workshops

Workshops are also held concurrently with regular sessions and symposia but tend to be more interactive and informal in nature and to emphasise discussion and the exchange of information among all participants.  Workshops are most often led by a single organiser/presenter who may simply act as a moderator to guide and facilitate group discussion.  Workshops may be intended to generate analysis around a particular topic or to examine specific technical knowledge, skills or methologies, and in some cases they aim to produce a scientific outcome (eg publication, topical working group, new collaboration or initiative).  As with symposia, workshops will be allocated a 90 minute time slot during the scientific programme (and in rare cases two consecutive slots), and organisers have considerable flexibility to structure this time as they see most productive given their goals and objectives.

1. Evaluation Process and Criteria

The SER2015 Scientific Committee will make the final decision with regard to the acceptance and scheduling of all symposia and workshops.  Proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis and acceptance notices will be sent as soon as possible in order to allow organisers sufficient time to coordinate with speakers, make travel arrangements, seek institutional support and secure sponsorship as necessary.

Proposals will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

  • academic (pure or applied) merit, with emphasis on new research results, cutting-edge developments, novel perspectives and innovative or interdisciplinary approaches
  • submissions should be associated to one of the conference themes; urban, rural or wild (please state which)
  • clear relevance to the field of ecological restoration indicating whether the proposal covers one or more of the scientific, educational, cultural and/or artistic themes (please state which)
  • applicability to ecosystem management practices and/or policy
  • availability of funding to support speaker attendance
  • submission of a clearly written and compelling proposal that includes a draft programme for the symposium, workshop or training course

Organisers will be notified electronically concerning the receipt, review and acceptance of their proposal via the e-mail address provided no later than 23rd January 2015.  If for some reason you do not hear from the secretariat by this date, please contact the secretariat.

2. Organiser Responsibilities

All sessions must have a lead organiser who serves as the primary point of contact.  This person should be readily available by email in the months leading up to the conference and is expected to be present at the symposium or workshop.

It is the responsibility of the lead organiser to communicate information to the individuals participating in their session and to ensure that the participants register.  The Programme Committee reserves the right to rescind the offer of a session in the programme for workshops, training courses or symposia if the speakers are not registered by a specified deadline.

Funding: SER will provide meeting space and onsite logistical support for all symposia and workshops but is not able to offer any travel or accommodation assistance, honoraria, complimentary registration or other funding to session organisers or individual speakers/presenters.  SER encourages prospective organisers to seek sponsorships and/or institutional support to help offset the costs.  Please ensure that information about funding is made clear to all speakers you invite to participate.

If your proposal is accepted: Organisers are responsible for ensuring that all presenters taking part in their symposium or workshop submit an abstract by the deadline (Friday 13th February) via the online form accompanying the Call for Abstracts.  Presenters must also register for the conference before the deadline for presenter registration on 1st June 2015.  Presenters who fail to meet these deadlines may be excluded from the scientific programme.  Symposium and workshop organisers must also submit an abstract as above if they plan to give a presentation during their session and would like their abstract included in the abstract publication.

Symposia organisers are advised that if they are unable to secure enough presenters to fill the symposium or to replace any presenters who cancel, the Scientific Committee may assign an appropriate speaker from the general pool of abstract submissions.  The Committee will make every effort to coordinate with you and obtain your approval in the event that this occurs.

3. Guidelines for Submitting a Proposal

All proposals must be submitted no later than Friday 12th December 2014.  Proposals must be submitted in English using the online submission form provided below.

Please do not submit a proposal if you are not completely sure that you will be able to fulfill your obligation to organise and conduct such an event.

The following information is required; incomplete or inaccurate proposals may not be accepted.

Title: Only capitalize the first word, the word following a colon and all proper nouns and adjectives as shown in the example here.  Italicise Latin species names.

Please avoid the temptation to use ALL CAPITAL LETTERS!

Session Summary: A brief overview of the objective(s), topics to be covered and relevance of the symposium, workshop or training course to practitioners, scientists and/or decision makers in the field of ecological restoration.  The session summary will be reproduced in the conference programme verbatim so please avoid spelling and grammatical errors.

Lead Organiser and Secondary Contact (if applicable)
Note that your name and institutional affiliation will be reproduced in the conference programme as they appear in your proposal.  All communications regarding your proposal, including acceptance notices, will be directed to the email address you provide.

Please avoid the tempation to use ALL CAPITAL LETTERS!

Draft Programme for your Symposium or Workshop
It is important that you provide a draft programme for your symposium, workshop or training course to aid in the evaluation process (and later the planning process).  This programme does not have to be final at the time you submit your proposal and can be modified later.

Symposia: please provide a tentative list of speakers and the titles of their presentations, if available.

Workshops: please provide a brief description of the structure, speakers/presenters and any expected outcomes.

Room set up and equipment requirements
Please let us know if your workshop requires a special room arrangement or equipment other than a dedicated laptop computer, data projector and screen.  It may not be possible to accommodate all requests but the secretariat will advise organisers if there are any constraints.  Please note that all symposia will have a standard room set up.

Sponsorship
Please indicate the availability of funding or in-kind support to cover the costs of organising your symposium, workshop or training course.  As explained above, SER will be unable to provide any financial assistance to help offset the cost of your participation or the participation of any speakers you may invite.

4. Summary of Important Dates and Deadlines

  • 12th September 2014: Call for proposals opens
  • 31st October 2014: Call for abstracts opens
  • 12th December 2014: Call for proposals closes
  • 23rd January 2015: Proposal review process complete (acceptance and rejection notices sent)
  • 13th February 2015: Call for abstracts closes
  • 10th April 2015: Abstract review process complete (acceptance and rejection notices sent)
  • 8th May 2015: Schedule-at-a-glance (with date and time of all sessions) is available
  • 1st June 2015: Presenter registration deadline

5. Cancellation Policy

Please do not submit a proposal if you are not completely sure that you will be able to fulfill your obligation to organise and conduct such an event.  Once a symposium, workshop or training course has been accepted and scheduled, it imposes a serious burden to cancel it and prevents other events from being selected.

If extenuating circumstances force you to cancel your session, we ask that you notify us as soon as possible so that we can reorganise the conference schedule and make alternative arrangements.

6. Online Proposal Submission Form

Please ensure you have read all the information detailed above before progressing to the submission form.  To make a submission, please click here.

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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#GreenFests Top Picks: Scottish International Storytelling Festival

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Bringing performers and spectators from across the world, the theme of the 2014 festival is “Once Upon a Place.” The programme offers many fantastic performances, with a healthy dose of green-tinged activity. The following are Creative Carbon Scotland’s top green picks from the 2014 Scottish International Storytelling Festival programme. The full programme can be viewed here.

Natural Stories, 25 October 2014

“Explore the forms and patterns of living nature through storytelling, felt making and story drama. Introductory story followed by wet-felting and story drama activities, with artist Joanne Baker and storyteller Allison Galbraith. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Please bring an apron, a towel and a plastic bag to take your damp felt home. In association with Lapidus Scotland.”

Mountain Vision: The Landscape Experience, 25 October 2014

“Scotland’s song traditions are intimately connected with “the high hills” and Scotland’s mountainous terrain. Travelling on North America’s Pacific west, in the high sierras, John Muir realised his very Scottish vision of “living with nature”. Musicians and storytellers Geordie MacIntyre and Alison McMorlandrecapture the spirit of mountain vision in its Scottish sources.”

Storytelling for a Greener World, 26 October 2014

“Experience natural stories of all kinds in the beautiful setting of Edinburgh’s botanical gardens. Stories will emerge gently in different locations, while story walks meander between the story encampment and the outer reaches. Also included is a specially commissioned performance of Where Curlews Call by Malcolm Green and Nick Hennesset at 3pm, and an introduction to the ground-breaking Hawthorn Press book, Storytelling for a Greener World.”

From the Pacific Coast, 26 October 2014

“Canadian storyteller Dawne McFarlane shares the rich traditions of Canada’s Pacific coast with stories from land and sea. For many Europeans, including Robert Louis Stevenson, the Pacific journey begins here.”

Between Tides, 27 October 2014

“Tentsmuir is a unique area of North East Fife caught between the tides and endowed with a rich ecology. Lea Taylor, Mairi Campbell and Derek Robertson combine with Scottish natural heritage to capture the flow of nature and the spirit of a special place. This performance follows on from the Place Based Learning workshop.”

 

The post #GreenFests Top Picks: Scottish International Storytelling Festival appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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