Monthly Archives: December 2015

Call for Proposals: 2016 Cheng Long Wetlands International Environmental Art Project

Call for Proposals: 2016 Cheng Long Wetlands International Environmental Art Project

Yunlin County, Taiwan

 “Meet the Future in Cheng Long:  The Next 30 Years”

Artists from all countries are invited to send a proposal for a site-specific outdoor sculpture installation that will raise public awareness about global warming and land sinking around the world and address what we want our environment to be for the future. 2016 is the 30th year since farmlands in Cheng Long village were covered by water and became the Cheng Long Wetlands nature preserve.  This situation we met in Cheng Long 30 years ago might happen anywhere in the world due to global warming and climate change and continued human neglect and mistakes. 30 years ago when Typhoon Wayne came and the wetlands were formed, the people had no choice.  Now we can think more about what we want for the future and take steps to improve the environment with such changes as sustainable living, carbon reduction and environmentally friendly industry.

Cheng Long is in a low-lying coastal area, and the land in Cheng Long sinks more each year due to over pumping of the underground aquifer, increasingly severe typhoons and rising water levels caused by global warming. The Cheng Long Wetlands provide a great home for many different species of wildlife, including about 120 species of wild birds and many other unique creatures and plants. The wetlands are also valuable as a place for learning, recreation and aesthetic enrichment as well as international cultural exchange activities such as the annual international environmental art project. Wetlands also provide many ecological benefits such as water purification, flood protection, erosion control and shoreline stabilization as well as commercial benefits from fish and shellfish production and increased tourism. The artworks in 2016 should relate to environmental issues in Cheng Long, a small village near the southwest coast of Taiwan, and encourage people to think about the next 30 years and what they would like to see happen for the future.

The artists selected for this art project will create large-scale outdoor public artworks during a 25-day artist in residency in Cheng Long village, Yunlin County, Taiwan.  For this 7th year of the Cheng Long International Environmental Art Project, we expect to select 5 artists (including at least 1 Taiwanese artist) based on the proposals received. This environmental art project is organized by the Kuan Shu Educational Foundation as part of their ongoing environmental education program in Cheng Long village with the Taiwan Forestry Bureau. The selected artists will work with elementary school students at Cheng Long Elementary School (a small village school with about 66 students in grades 1 – 6) and community residents, visitors and volunteers to create large-scale sculpture installations that will raise awareness about environmental issues and help develop community pride and promote environmental education.

In 2016 the artworks will be sited in the wetlands nature preserve area of Cheng Long Wetlands, a sunken land area mostly covered by water, part salty and part fresh water, and now a nature preserve that is home to many birds, fish and other wildlife. Artists making proposals should visit the Blog at http://artproject4wetland.wordpress.com to see possible sites for the outdoor sculpture installations in 2016 as well as look at previous year’s artworks. The final selection of the site for each proposed artwork will be made with the artists and the approval of the curator and organizers. Artists are required to use natural and biodegradable materials and environmentally friendly processes that encourage sustainability and preserving and improving the environment. The artworks should last for one year or more, but they should be biodegradable so that they can decompose over time and be left to recycle naturally and enhance the environment of the wetlands. Artists will work alongside other international artists and Taiwanese artists and with local children and volunteers in Cheng Long village.

Deadline for Entries: January 15, 2016

Artists will be selected and notified by February 18, 2016

Installation and Residency in Cheng Long, Taiwan: Thursday, April 7 (artists arrive) – Monday, May 2, 2016 (artists depart)

Dates of the Exhibition: April 29, 2016 (opening ceremony), April 30 and May 1, 2016 (Opening weekend activities with the artists).  The exhibition will be on display through March 2017, and the artworks may continue to be enjoyed into the next years.

Selected Artists will receive the following:

  • Artist’s Award of NT$60,000 (about US$2,000) for creating the artwork and participating as an artist in the public programs and working with community school children, residents, volunteers and visitors.
  • Round trip economy airfare from the artist’s home to Taipei (Taoyuan International Airport). Artists must pay their own train fare (approx. US$35) to Yunlin High Speed Rail Station where the artists will be picked up and brought by car to Cheng Long Village. Detailed travel instructions will be sent to selected artists, and artists must get the approval of the curator before booking tickets and keep all receipts for reimbursement when they arrive in Cheng Long.
  • 25 days of accommodations and meals in Cheng Long with other international and Taiwanese artists. Each artist will have a separate bedroom, but bathrooms and living areas may be shared. Breakfast and dinner will be provided at the accommodations, and artists will eat lunch at the elementary school. Some group dinners will also be provided.
  • Local transportation to scheduled site-seeing trips with the artists and volunteers will be provided. Bicycles will be provided for the artists to use around the local area if they wish.
  • Volunteer help from school children and adults in the community and one adult volunteer to help each artist for the entire residency period. This adult volunteer will be able to speak English and Chinese. However, artists should have confidence that they can finish their proposed artwork on their own.
  • Help to find local natural, biodegradable and recycled materials to make the artworks. Local natural materials include shells, reeds, grasses, bamboo, driftwood, branches, earth, sand, etc.  Other possible biodegradable materials include natural rope, nets, natural fiber fabric, wood and other recycled materials.  Artists who need to purchase materials to make their artwork must consult with the curator, and pay for this from their own artists’ Award.  We hope that artists will use mostly free recycled and available natural materials.

Qualifications of Artists:

Artists who apply should have experience working with children and communities to create large scale site-specific outdoor sculpture installations in public settings and involve ordinary people in their thoughts and process. The artists should also have an interest in environmental issues related to wetlands. The selected artists should be able to speak English and be able to get along well with other artists, the local community and people of all ages and backgrounds. The selected artists should also be able to introduce their home culture to the community and share the environmental concerns of their own part of the world. We plan to select 5 artists total for 2016; at least 1 artist will be from Taiwan.

Curator of the Exhibition:

Jane Ingram Allen, is an American independent curator, artist and critic, living in Taiwan from 2004 – 2012, and now based in California, USA. Jane first came to Taiwan as a Fulbright Scholar artist in residence in 2004 and 2005 and worked as an independent artist and curator in Taiwan from 2006-2012, starting the Guandu International Outdoor Sculpture Festival at Guandu Nature Park in Taipei in 2006 and the Cheng Long Wetlands International Environmental Art Project in Cheng Long village, Yunlin County, Taiwan in 2010 as well as the National Museum of Marine Science & Technology Environmental Art Project in Keelung, Taiwan in 2015. For the Cheng Long art project Jane works with the staff of the Kuan Shu Educational Foundation and a community advisory committee of teachers, government leaders and community people to administer and coordinate all aspects of this project, including the selection of artists and supervising the art installations and public programs related to the art project. Jane has experience curating international art exhibitions and working with public art projects in communities around the world as well as being an art professor at colleges and universities and a curator and educator at museums and art centers. Jane is an environmental artist herself and has participated in many international artist-in-residency programs in the USA, Taiwan, Japan, Brazil, Tanzania, China, Indonesia, and Nepal.  She has also curated several other environmental art exhibitions in Taiwan and the USA and writes about art for such magazines as SCULPTURE, PUBLIC ART REVIEW, ART RADAR ASIA, FIBER ART NOW and HAND PAPERMAKING.

To Apply:

Send the following in English by email to Jane Ingram Allen before the deadline of January 15, 2016, at this address: allenrebeccajanei@gmail.com

Proposals in Chinese may be sent to Ms. Chao-Mei Wang, chenglong.artproject@gmail.com before the January 15, 2016 deadline.

  1. Description of a proposed sculpture installation for the 2016 Cheng Long Wetlands International Environmental Art Project (limit one page), sent as an attached .doc or .pdf file. Include dimensions and materials to be used in the proposed work.
  2. Artist Statement about your interest and experience working with communities, volunteers and children to create sculpture and installation art projects. Also in the statement, tell how your proposed work relates to the theme of global warming and sinking land, and be sure to tell how you will involve the Cheng Long Elementary School children in your artwork. The statement should be limited to one page and sent as an attached .doc or .pdf file.
  3. Sketch or rendering of your proposed artwork (attached .jpg file of less than 1 MB)
  4. 6 images of previous related works (6 attached .jpg files of less than 1 MB each)
  5. Image list with details about the 6 images. Include title of work, date made, materials used, dimensions, and location of the artwork (attached .doc file or .pdf file)
  6. CV or Resume in English (attached .doc or .pdf file) that details your education and art experience, awards and exhibitions and any international experience. Be sure to include your name, present address and nationality.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  All 6 required items should be sent as separate attached files by email.  Do not put all files into 1 .pdf or .doc file, and do not use a Zip file.

 

 

 

Updates from the Broadway Green Alliance

We are pleased to once again offer the College Green Captain prize to an outstanding student Green Captain who has helped their campus theatre department get meaningfully greener. Please go here for more information. The deadline is March 1, 2016. 

Chapter Report: Chicago Green Theatre Alliance

On October 2 and 3, 2015 the Chicago Green Theatre Alliance (CGTA) collected cast-off costumes from several large theatres including Steppenwolf, Northlight and Writers Theatre. This collection of costumes and textiles was offered to member companies of the League of Chicago Theatres and local designers. Many happy people left with armloads of costumes, delighted that they had some beautiful and useful pieces that would help them immensely in their upcoming seasons. After all the exchanging was done, the leftover costumes and textiles were bagged up and taken away to be recycled through Chicago Textile Recycling. 45% of donated items are worn as second hand clothing. 30% of donated items are recycled into wiping cloths. 15% of donated items are reprocessed into fibers. More than one full gaylord of e-waste was also collected at the event. This was the CGTA’s second drive of the year. Last May, CGTA collected 2.5 tons of electronic waste from theatres all over Chicago. Not only did this e-waste get recycled responsibly, but was done at no cost to theatres and freed up space for them! CGTA is committed to bringing Chicago theatres these drives every year with the goal of providing free, responsible recycling and reuse options to theatres.

The Broadway Green Alliance is happy to announce a new program with lcon Parking providing free valet bike parking at two midtown locations.

lcon, the largest parking company in NYC, is now working to be the most environmentally friendly parking company as well. They are working on a large initiative to become a paperless parking provider and working on programs for car sharing, electric car charging stations, mobile valet services, parking reservations and, of particular interest to BGA members, bike parking. lcon will provide any BGA member with FREE BIKE PARKING at the two locations below if you return the claim ticket with a BGA sticker on it.

For free bike parking your claim ticket must be validated with a BGA sticker on the back. Stickers are available in advance from the BGA office (165 West 46th St., Suite 1312 M-F 10-6) or from a Broadway show’s Green Captain.

Participating Icon locations:
lcon – Mercury Parking LLC
350 West 50th Street
Between 8th & 9th
Entrances at 350 West 50th or 355 West 49th St.

lcon – Matinee 52 LLC
810 7th Avenue
Between Broadway & 7th Ave
Entrances at 207 West 52nd St. or 1676 Broadway

                            Go toBroadwayGreen.com/Icon for FAQs and more information.

BGA gives out first ever Off-Off Broadway Greening Grants

The Broadway Green Alliance awarded $2,500 to fund greening projects in the Off-Off Broadway or Independent theater community. The goal is to support environmentally friendly projects and activities, and to communicate about those programs to a broader audience. We received an outstanding group of proposals and are pleased to announce the recipients of the 2015 Off-Off Broadway/Independent greening grants.

These grants are designed to encourage an independent venue, company, or producer to initiate a specific greener change.The theaters received the grants for projects including LED lighting upgrades, bathroom upgrades, and switches to digital from paper.

The recipients of the 2015 Independent greening grants are: Superhero Clubhouse, Access Theater, Page 73, Movement Theater, and Theatre for a New City. Congratulations!

And speaking of biking…

Bike the 5 Boroughs with the BGA!

We are happy to announce that the BGA has once again been picked as a Charity Partner for the 2016 TD Five Boro Bike Ride run by non-profit Bike NY. We have ten spots for this popular 40-mile ride, on Sunday, May 1st, that goes through each borough. The money we raise from this event funds many of our events and projects, including our Off-Broadway and independent theater greening grants. Email rsale@broadwaygreen.com if you’d like to join our team.

BroadwayCon is coming!

BroadwayCon is the first-ever convention for fans of Broadway and theater,
scheduled for January 22-24, 2016 at the New York Hilton Midtown. BroadwayCon will feature workshops, panels, performances, sing-alongs and interviews. We are organizing a session on Broadway Going Green. Several of our Broadway Green Captains will participate in a panel on how they keep it green on the great white way. We will also be selling BGA green merchandise at the event.  You can find more information at broadwaycon.com

Designing & Sourcing Green:

The Greenhouse Ensemble’s “Danny and the Deep Blue Sea”The Greenhouse Ensemble’s production of John Patrick Shanley’s “Danny and the Deep Blue Sea” comes to the Upper West Side this week. Directed by Drama Desk and Obie Award winning and Broadway alum Austin Pendleton, the production features a greener approach to its set design.

The Greenhouse ensemble’s experimental nature lent itself to conceptualizing the show in a sustainable manner, and the artistic staff took a risk visually with BGA member & set designer Joseph Napolitano’s ideas. “The main challenge is sourcing specific materials,” Napolitano says. “Once you create a design and it’s on paper, you’ve made a commitment to it. You and your team have to find the salvaged pieces to make it work.” The pieces for this show have all had a former life. The design calls for swaths of material which were sourced from a non-Equity tour, and cut and dyed to the appropriate sizes and color. Metallic Mylar finishes that are applied to portions of the set were collected from theaters and universities on the east coast and brought to the city for use. Finally, the team came to the idea of installing clotheslines above the set, filling the space’s height with familiar imagery of a densely populated, derelict metropolis. The lines are filled with garments and fabric selected within a specific color palette. These clothes will be given to local thrift shops after the show closes. Once the show finishes up in NYC, it tours with dates starting as early as late December in Michigan. For tickets, go here  and take advantage of the Greenhouse Ensemble’s commitment to greener and affordable theater.

If you are interested in greener materials for your next project, check some of these places for sustainable sourcing:

Till It’s Gone | Istanbul Museum of Modern Art

This post comes from MELD

Featuring artists from various periods and geographies, TILL IT’S GONE explores artistic positions and approaches to the ecological issues and to the world we live in.

Arjen de Leeuw, Act, 2012, HD Video, 2’55’’ © Arjen de Leeuw, Courtesy of the Artist.

Istanbul Modern welcomes 2016 with an exhibition praising nature and focusing on environmental awareness. The exhibition reflects artists’ relationship with nature and interpretations of the concept of sustainability. Featuring artists from various periods and geographies, TILL IT’S GONE explores artistic positions and approaches to the ecological issues and to the world we live in.

Markus Hoffmann, Level Up, 2013. HD Video, 7’50’’, Dead Sea, Israel. © Markus Hoffmann, Courtesy of the Artist.

Su Rynard, Bear, 2004 – 2006, Video SD, 9’30’’ © Susan C Rynard, Courtesy of the Artist.

Scheduled to open on January 13, the exhibition’s preliminary program features Yoko Ono’s large-scale installation “Ex It”, described as “life as a continuation” by the artist.

Curators: Çelenk Bafra, Paolo Colombo

Istanbul Museum of Modern Art logo

The post, Till It’s Gone | Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, appeared first on MELD.
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meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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Sustainability in Production Alliance needs you

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

So what is the Sustainabilty in Production Alliance (SiPA)?

SiPANetworkBack in September 2015 Fiona MacLennan spoke to Andy Purves and Craig Bennet, the founders of the Sustainability in Production Alliance to find out more about the alliance. Both Craig and Andy are members of the Association of Lighting Designers and have worked for many years in the live production industry. They have become concerned at the direction the industry is moving in and the lack of sustainable thinking. Their concerns encompassed financial, environmental, and social sustainability and between them they decided it was time to do something about it.

At PLASA 2014 a panel assembled by the Association of Lighting Designers debated sustainability. It was recognised that each facet of the industry working disparately could not effect the necessary culture change. This ultimately led to the creation of Sustainability in Production Alliance (SiPA). The alliance is formed of representatives from all sectors of the industry.

The SiPA network

We will only move forward as an industry if we communicate and work together to change our culture”.

A large number of those at the event expressed an interest in being involved and during 2014/15 a group of those interested professionals got together and agreed on a set of goals covering Social, Environmental and Economic sustainability.

The goals cover an initial 10 year period from 2015 to 2025 and are intended to form a framework to stimulate individual, collaborative and industry-wide action.

  • The pillars of sustainability – social, environmental, and economic each support three SiPA goals, facilitated by a group of goal guardians.
  • Goal guardians work with a team of goal allies (you) to ensure communication and collaboration will reach all sectors of the supply chain.
  • Each goal group will collect information, form agreements, and embed outcomes into daily practice.
  • Practice is the key here; SiPA is practical. The SiPA initiative removes the cultural boundaries to sustainability that are naturally present within the industry. Understanding the needs and actions of others will create a combined force to tackle some of our biggest issues.
  • The goal groups will work transparently and present progress on an annual basis.

The press launch of SiPA – The Sustainability in Production Alliance took place on 8th September 2015, at the Unicorn Theatre and this was followed up by the successful launch of the initiative at PLASA 2015 in London, Creative Carbon Scotland is keen to promote their message in Scotland and will be presenting a seminar on the Goals at:

PLASA Focus Glasgow

Igniting Sustainable Culture Change in the Live Production Industry

Thursday 21 January 2016 14:00-14:45 pm (Alsh Room)

You can help

SiPA would like to hear from anyone interested in becoming involved. They are recruiting goal guardians. To find out more check out the SiPa website where you can find information on what’s involved and how to contact the Alliance

NOTE: SiPA is 100% unfunded but has been supported in-kind by:

  • Entertaining Sustainability – for sharing of their web space and forums
  • PLASA – for provision of space and a show stand at the PLASA trade show
  • The Association of Lighting Designers – for initiating the debate
  • The Theatres Trust – for provision of meeting space
  • White Light Ltd – for support and provision of materials

SiPA is a voluntary group. The group will use social media to spread their message to manufacturers, product designers, hire, sales and events companies, designers, stage managers, technicians and engineers, production managers, producers, architects and theatre consultants, students, educators, directors, choreographers, venue managers… the live production industry

The post Sustainability in Production Alliance needs you appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Liu Bolin Reminds Us Of The Destruction Brought By Coal And Deforestation

This post comes from MELD

“I put my thinking of the whole of society and my view of the entire world into my artworks,”

Liu Bolin produces sculptures, installations, paintings, and photographs in which he critiques global societies. Though he has traveled to cities like New York and Paris for his work, he focuses principally on his native China, characterized by rampant development and consumerism. Among his best-known projects is his “Hiding in the City” series (begun 2005). Eschewing Photoshop, Liu stands in front of iconic cultural, historical, and commercial sites, camouflages himself to blend (almost) seamlessly into his surroundings, and photographs himself. The resulting images show him dissolved into shelves of junk food or the Great Wall—a Taoist vision of oneness with the world, and a warning of contemporary society’s consumptive power.

A consequence of China’s rapid economic development through industrialisation, urbanisation, and excessive consumption, is the severe deterioration of ecology and the highly polluted urban living environment. Mountains have been deforested, if not split or leveled for urban constructions; rivers have been dried if not contaminated by industrial wastes; and landscapes have been transformed beyond recognition. In particular, for urban dwellers, outdoor air pollution has recently been identified as the fourth-leading factor for premature death in China . To compensate for the destruction of nature, urban planners started designing green zones and parks amid concrete jungles made up of urban high-rises to bring a small piece of nature back to human living. Hiding in the City No. 94 – In the Woods speaks to the belated human awareness of the importance of trees, nature, and clean air, in which Liu Bolin “disappears” into a small forest in an urban park.

In 2010 Liu Bolin created the optical illusion of thousands of people who disappear (die) every year because of China’s massive coal consumption. Devoid of regulation, China’s coal mines experience regular explosions, cave-ins, and other fatal disasters. “Coal Pile is a conceptual commentary on the consequences of not only the dependence on coal, a limited resource, but the dangers that come for families who work with and use coal, ironically, to survive,” explains the artist.

The post, Liu Bolin Reminds Us Of The Destruction Brought By Coal And Deforestation, appeared first on MELD.
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meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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Free Energy & Carbon Audit for SMEs

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

In collaboration with the Carbon Trust, The University of Edinburgh & University of Strathclyde

The Energy and Carbon Audit programme is provided free to selected small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the Glasgow and Edinburgh areas by a partnership between the Carbon Trust, University of Strathclyde and University of Edinburgh.

It will help you to understand and reduce energy and other costs in your business, providing a clear assessment of your organisation’s carbon footprint and a practical action plan to make savings and take positive steps towards environmental sustainability.

Postgraduate students from the respective universities are trained by the Carbon Trust to complete an audit at an SME site, as part of their studies towards a Masters degree in engineering, carbon management or other related discipline. They will be selected to work with your business, backed by the support and experience of the Carbon Trust. This is highly valuable practical experience, carried out to professional standards, benefitting the students’ development and helping to produce a much-needed future generation of skilled technical specialists in business sustainability.

The link below gives a clear summary of how the programme works for the prospective businesses and what you need to do to participate:  http://www.carbontrust.com/media/560352/free-energy-and-carbon-audit-for-smes-glasgow-edinburgh.pdf

To confirm interest in participating in this free programme please send an email with your contact details and brief description of your business to: paul.wedgwood@carbontrust.com.

The post Free Energy & Carbon Audit for SMEs appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Climate Research Project- Something a little different than a submission call…

To whom it may concern,

This is something a little different than a submission call, we are seeking help with a research project.

We (Joa&P) and the Llano del Rio Collective are collaborating on a project charting concrete and abstract ecological relations that people operate within to address, bolster and alter (through creative work) their relationships to a changing world. The project will use the metaphors of geology to add to a conversation about what it is to live, create, and challenge our changing world. We aim to locate these tectonics and humors, and identify the characters of forces working to sustain and reshape our ecological world.

In a country like France, where radioactive clouds stop at the border and where we aren’t afraid to build a cancer research center on the former site of a nitrogen fertilizer factory that has been condemned by the EU’s industrial safety agency, we should count less on “natural” crises than on social ones. It is usually up to the social movements to interrupt the normal course of the disaster.
-The Invisible Committee, The Coming Insurrection

When it is necessary to change an automobile tire, open an abscess or plow a vineyard, it is easy to imagine a quite limited operation. The elements on which the action is brought to bear are not completely isolated from the rest of the world, but it is possible to act on them as if they were: One can complete the operation without once needing to consider the whole, of which the tire, the abscess or the vineyard is nevertheless an integral part.
– Georges Bataille, The Accursed Share

Dogs are about the inescapable, contradictory story of relationships- co-constitutive relationships in which none of the partners pre-exist the relating, and the relating is never done once and for all. Historical specificity and contingent mutability all the way down, into nature and culture, into naturecultures. There is no contingent mutability rule all the way down, into nature and culture, into natureculture. There is no foundation; there are only elephants supporting elephants all the way down.
-Donna Haraway, The Companion Species Manifesto

Life is built on relations. Climate change dramatically alters the terms of these relations. Action and creativity alter these relationships to end harmful patterns and facilitate the emergence of more healthy ecological relations; between people, between individuals and natural systems, and between humans and the economies they exist within.

The Project

We are interested in sighting these emerging creative practices and actions.

Toward this effort we are hoping to survey the land to create a guide to the humors working today. Whether you’re creating projects that change the perception or alter our dependence on oil, reframe our relationship to extractive technology and the abstraction of resources, re-network the material and emotional routes against and beyond oil-time, or explore the metaphors of energy itself, we’d love to hear from you.

The Climate Change/Change the Climate guide will be a practical and projective resource for individuals looking for ways to plug-in to a biological struggle.

Please send us simply:

1. the name of your project
2. The location where your work functions.
3. website or online reference to the project
4. A simple description (one paragraph tops please!) of what you are doing.

All submissions will be considered for inclusion in this guide.<

Deadline and mailing
Please mail it to us by February 1st, 2016
Mail to editors(at)joaap.org

Warmest Regards, In Cahoots…

(ps. As Climate Games says, “We are nature defending itself)

(pps. we’ve also really been digging Jason W. Moore, Frans Fanon, Amaia Pérez Orozco, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Montse Galseran for the ideas we’ve been thinking through on this… and many more.)

Ashden Directory receives the 2015 Nick Reeves AWEinspiring Award

We are honoured to announce that the Ashden Directory, Ashdenizen and Landings Stages have been awarded the 2015 Nick Reeves AWEinspiring Award for Arts, Water and the Environment.

The award is presented by the Arts and Environment Network of the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) in association with the Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World (CCANW).

The award celebrates projects that have contributed innovatively to CIWEM’s vision of ‘putting creativity at the heart of environmental policy and action.’

Each year, on the Directory and Ashdenizen, we looked forward to announcing the AWEinspiring winner, never expecting to be on the other side of the story. We have long appreciated the work of the late Nick Reeves, and the Arts and Environment strand of CIWEM, which has shown the way for other organisations to acknowledge and incorporate the arts in their thinking and in their work.

In making the award, CIWEM found that ‘the vision, intention and execution of the Directory has been far-reaching, and represents an impressively deep treatment of ecology in theatre and the performing arts over many years’.

We are very proud to be included in the company of past winners and would like to thank also the many artists and writers whose pioneering work has provided the inspiration for the Ashden Directory, Ashdenizen and Landing Stages.

warm regards

Wallace Heim, Robert Butler, Kellie Gutman and Eleanor Margolies

Landing Stages. Selections from the Ashden Directory 2000 – 2014, available as pdf on www.ashdendirectory.org.uk

There are hard copies of Landing Stages available. Please contactashdentrust@sfct.org.uk if you are interested in receiving a copy.

The Ashden Directory of Environment and Performance,www.ashdendirectory.org.uk

Ashdenizen, ashdenizen.blogspot.co.uk

 

For more information on the award:

CIWEM www.ciwem.org/competition-and-awards/the-nick-reeves-award.aspx

CCANW www.ccanw.co.uk/

Art, EcoJustice, and Education: Call for Proposals

The Art-Eco Project is pleased to announce a call for proposals for a peer-reviewed, edited book project on art and EcoJustice. The collection of articles from various authors will enlighten different ways of studying, supporting, and sharing the themes of socio-ecological issues through artistic practice.

The principal aim of EcoJustice thinking is to understand the essential interdependence among humans and with the more than human world. It is crucial to acknowledge the fact that we are mutually responsible to and dependent on others. Any assumption that we are superior to or outside this interdependence will cause damage.

EcoJustice work (teaching, scholarship and art) thus works along three interrelated strands of analysis: 1) The first involves an understanding that the present problems of ecological and social violence are rooted in the deep cultural assumptions underlying modernity. Our taken-for-granted value-hierarchized worldview, including anthropocentrism, linear thinking, individualism, science based rationalism and instrumentalism, has to be challenged in order to change the course of action towards regarding all life as equally valuable. 2) The second strand is focused on identifying those patterns of belief and behavior that lead to mutual care and the protection of more sustainable ways of life both within modern societies and traditional indigenous communities. We name this process revitalizing the commons. 3) The third strand argues for imagination as an important means of engaging the forms of responsibility needed to generate healthy communities. As Wendell Berry has written, “for humans to have a responsible relationship to the world, they must imagine their places in it” (2012, p. 15). We must, that is, imagine that it is possible to live ethically on this earth and what that could look like.

This book will be organized to explore how artistic practice intersects with and informs this EcoJustice framework. We recognize that this is an interdisciplinary field with many diverse entry points. Scholars draw from a range of philosophical and social theoretical view points—post structuralism, phenomenology, post-humanism, feminist theory, queer theory, new materialism, for example—as well as artistic practices—culture jamming, environmental art, improvisation, participatory art, community dance, documentary theatre, just to name a few. And we ask questions about what the intersection of these theories and practices could mean for education.

We thus invite essays that explore intersections among art practice and the EcoJustice framework. Essays could focus on (but are not limited to) the following:

  • empathy, compassion and art
  • performing identities and differences (race, gender, sexuality, ability, etc.)
  • imagination and transformation
  • time and space-based art
  • indigenous or place-based knowledge and understanding
  • immaterial art and consumerism
  • environmental art as activism
  • street art and the property of place

Specific Guidelines: Proposals should be approximately 500 words and include a brief abstract of 100 words. Include a brief bibliography. Priority will be given to those works that make clear their connection to the EcoJustice framework.

Deadline for proposals is Feb 29th 2016.

Please send your proposal (in file format .doc or .pdf) to raisa.foster@artecoproject.com.

The book is edited by Raisa Foster, Ph.D. (research director, Art-Eco Project), Jussi Mäkelä (researcher, Art-Eco Project) and Rebecca Martusewicz, Ed.D. (Eastern Michigan University).

AEJE_call for proposals (pdf)

Away with the birds

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Hannah Tuulikki, Away with the Birds, 2014, Film still, Daniel Warren

Last summer several years’ worth of development culminated in the performances of Away with the birds, written and performed by Hanna Tuulikki and produced by Suzy Glass.

Hanna Tuulikki’s Air falbh leis na h-eòin is a body of work exploring the mimesis of birds in Gaelic song.

Hanna’s vocal composition, Guth an Eòin | Voice of the Bird is the heart of the project. Written for a female vocal ensemble, it reinterprets archival material, fragmenting and re-weaving extracts of Gaelic songs into an extended soundscape. The music emerges from, and responds to, island landscapes and lives. It explores the delicate equilibrium of Hebridean life, the co-existence of tradition and innovation, and suggests the ever-present inter-relationship between bird, human, and ecology.

‘The piece is made from weaving together fragments of traditional songs and poems that imitate or emulate birdsong’ Tuulikki explains. ‘Each of the five movements represents a different habitat and bird community – wader, sea-bird, wildfowl, corvid, and cuckoo. In August we will perform the concert in the historic harbour of the beautiful Isle of Canna, where the music reverberates with the bird-calls and the ebb of the tide. The setting is so important to the piece. The Small Isles are a magical place and, to me, the performance begins as soon as people climb on-board the ferry-boat to make the crossing: the richness of the experience is people sharing a journey.’

Away with the Birds was conceived for and in relation to the Isle of Canna – its ecology, birdlife, history and community. The last custodians of the island, John Lorne Campbell and Margaret Fay Shaw, were renowned folklorists and ethnomusicologists whose extraordinary collection of Gaelic material is housed in Canna House. Steeped in the Gaelic tradition, their hospitality was famous and their home became a hive of creativity, welcoming artists, musicians, scientists and writers from across the world.

Access the interactive score with access to background material, audio and video clips as well as images here.

In this new version of Air falbh leis na h-eòin you become the navigator, steering your own way through Tuulikki’s score. Within its expansive sweep, sound, music, and movement are translated into gesture and precise notation. Words and vocables – sounds without meaning – represent the shapes of individual birds, flocks, skeins, waves and islands, as well as more abstracted forms, suggestive of motion or topography.

You can explore the entire composition in your own time, taking your own course. You can experience the texture of ecology, survey landscape and seascape, immerse yourself in the film, and read detailed notes on the source songs, poems, and birds. This is a prismatic experience that tunes us into a sonic continuum that reaches into the “more-than-human” world.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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