Monthly Archives: February 2016

An Oh-Yes-We-Can in Paris

This post comes to you from the Broadway Green Alliance

An Oh-Yes-We-Can in Paris
COP21 and what it means for the arts

By Stan Friedman

This past December, representatives of 195 nations came together in Paris to forge a landmark agreement designed to rein in global warming. The gathering, known as COP21, or, for the long winded, the 21st Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, put in place a series of regulations meant to save the planet from rising sea levels, destructive storms, droughts, floods and, you know, extinction.

In short, the COP21 delegates agreed to:

Lower pollution levels so that the rise in global temperatures is limited to no more than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, that being the point at which scientists believe serious devastation would kick in.

Limit greenhouse gases emitted by humans to the same level that nature can absorb naturally, beginning at some point between 2050 and 2100.

Review each country’s contribution to cutting emissions every five years.

Establish “climate financing,” wherein the wealthier countries provide funding to help poorer nations adapt to climate change and switch to renewable energy.

You can read the full 31-page agreement here.

Clearly, these are mega-initiatives with a global scope and a century-wide timeframe, so, how should we, as a community of theatre professionals, react in the here and now? How might COP21 affect the performing arts, both from the practical aspect of producing a show, and from the standpoint of providing creative inspiration for new works of environmental theater? We reached out for advice and examples from some experts. And, since this is a worldwide initiative, we cast our net internationally.  The responses have been intriguing and we will be sharing them with you in blog posts over the coming months. First up, a call to arms from Brussels and from London:

Ilse Joliet

Ilse is based in Brussels and is the Coordinator for IMAGINE 2020. She points to the usefulness of cooperation among arts groups, and the importance of making your message heard: “We believe it is important to share with the audience our concerns about what is going on in the world and how we can make things change.” Her organization has certainly done just that. They began, in 2007, as a group of six European theaters, gathered under the name Thin Ice, with the aim of spreading environmental responsibility in the theater world. Today, IMAGINE 2020 is made up of 11 arts organizations spread across nine European countries. From 2007 until 2013 they mainly commissioned and presented works of environmental theater and encouraged sustainable practices in theaters and cities. The last few years their focus has been more on “communication about the future of our planet through art, imagination and debating.” As explained on their website, they want to “engage the European cultural sector and use its creative potential to raise awareness, involving the general public both as audience and as participants. Art should provide a physical and imaginary space where people can take a step back, away from the corporate, the commercial and the educational, to exchange and engage with each other.”

Lucy Wood

Lucy is Program Director for Cape Farewell, a London-based non-profit. Working internationally, they bring artists, performers, educators, journalists and scientists together to “communicate on a human scale the urgency of the global climate challenge.”

Last September, Cape Farewell and French partner COAL launched a global arts festival calledArtCop21. Lucy explains, “ArtCop21 sought to engage with hundreds of thousands of members of the public in a more human, visceral way. Climate change is too often viewed through a policy or scientific lens. ArtCop21 aimed to challenge this trope, arguing that climate is very much a people problem – not one to be left to solely the politicians. Indeed it is the biggest ‘people’ problem we’ve ever faced. But the biggest challenge is to move people to care in the first place because denial is a powerful thing, particularly when faced with what feels like an impossible task.

“ArtCop21 exceeded expectations and built up an enormous cultural momentum – numbering a total 551 events in 54 countries. The festival brought a huge and inventive array of offerings, from a concert in the Arctic Circle featuring Led Zeppelin’s John Paul Jones to a street art exhibition in Benin, Africa.

“The festival sought out work that uses creativity to reframe the catastrophic, negative language of the climate battle into an opportunity for positive change. The thousands of voices involved in ArtCop21 argued that we need is a major cultural shift in the way we produce energy, consume, exchange and work and ultimately define ourselves and our culture. We need to move to a post-carbon culture and economy; and fast.”

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The Broadway Green Alliance was founded in 2008 in collaboration with the Natural Resources Defense Council. The Broadway Green Alliance (BGA) is an ad hoc committee of The Broadway League and a fiscal program of Broadway Cares/Equity Fights Aids. Along with Julie’s Bicycle in the UK, the BGA is a founding member of the International Green Theatre Alliance. The BGA has reached tens of thousands of fans through Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other media.

At the BGA, we recognize that it is impossible to be 100% “green” while continuing activity and – as there is no litmus test for green activity – we ask instead that our members commit to being greener and doing better each day. As climate change does not result from one large negative action, but rather from the cumulative effect of billions of small actions, progress comes from millions of us doing a bit better each day. To become a member of the Broadway Green Alliance we ask only that you commit to becoming greener, that you name a point person to be our liaison, and that you will tell us about your green-er journey.

The BGA is co-chaired by Susan Sampliner, Company Manager of the Broadway company of WICKED, and Charlie Deull, Executive Vice President at Clark Transfer<. Rebekah Sale is the BGA’s full-time Coordinator.

Go to the Broadway Green Alliance

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Call for Works: Tagore

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

THE SOIL IN return for her service
keeps the tree tied to her,
the sky asks nothing and leaves it free.

Fireflies, Rabindranath Tagore

Liz Adamson asked us to share that Professor Bashabi Fraser and Christine Kupfer are launching a new online journal called Gitanjali and Beyond, as part of their work at the Scottish  Centre of Tagore Studies.

Gitanjali and Beyond is a peer-reviewed open-access international journal, promoting creative writing and research on Rabindranath Tagore’s work and life, his circle and his impact. Tagore won the Noble Prize in literature (2013)

Call for artworks

We are looking for short articles with photos/ videos of artworks (painting, sculpture, photography, installation, performance art, new media etc.) for our new open-access online journal Gitanjali and Beyond, which publishes peer-reviewed academic articles, creative writing and art. Our upcoming issue is “Expression and relevance of Rabindranath Tagore’s spirituality in the arts, education and politics.” The artwork submissions do not have to directly relate to Tagore but should relate to aspects of his thinking related to this topic.

Rabindranath Tagore’s spiritual ideas are this-worldly and at the same time based on the belief in a deeper reality. His ideas were inspired by Hindu scriptures such as the Upanishads, Vaisnava, Baul, Buddhist and Persian traditions, the reformist involvement of his family in the Brahmo Samaj, and his encounters with ideas and people from around the world. At the same time, he creatively selected and reframed these ideas on the basis of his own revelations. Spirituality, for Tagore, touches every aspect of life and leads humanity to fullness and joy by connecting them with other people, with nature, and with spirituality. This connection is established through love, action and knowledge. Tagore’s spirituality has many social and political facets, as it encourages active involvement to make the world a better place by developing internationalism/cosmopolitanism, tolerance, and social engagement.

It is relevant for ecology as it embraces the connection and care for nature. He expressed all these ideas through his poetry and prose, through his educational and social endeavours, and through his art. Tagore’s ideas have been described as an artists’ religion, as they encourage creative interactions with the world.

Further inspiration can be found in his essays (e.g., https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/sadhana-by-tagore.pdf) and in his poetry  (http://www.tagoreweb.in/StaticTOC/AlphabeticEnglishVersesIndex.aspx?ct=Verses).

Decisions on publications will be made by the Art Editorial Board of Gitanjali and Beyond, based on the quality of the work.

Please send your submissions to c.kupfer@napier.ac.uk until 17 April 2016.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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Opportunity for Artists: Climart Commission

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This commission will run over a period of approximately 12 months and it is envisaged that some of this time will be spent in Norway facilitated by an artist’s fee and, where relevant, support from project partners. The final goal is the creation of a public artwork that embodies aspects of the research, creating a platform to test significance, affect and impact.

About Climart and the research

Communicating the facts of climate change is one of the most serious challenges of our era. Although there has been significant research about the visualization of climate change, research about the contribution of contemporary art has been scarce. The focus of Climart is to examine the underlying psychological mechanisms involved in both the production and reception of visual art and to use these findings in an attempt to unite the natural sciences to the visual arts. Ultimately, the project aims to identify effective communication methodologies that have the capacity to reach greater audiences, initiate discussion and potentially influence attitudes.

About the commission

This is an opportunity to develop new work that responds to an on-going psychological study seeking to uncover what methods of making most effectively communicate the science of climate change. Within this framework there is significant scope to develop the efficacy of art/science collaborations and make a high profile work with strong impact.

We are therefore seeking an artist who is interested in engaging fully with the work being conducted by the Climart project. This means that the commissioned artist will become an active member of the project, both benefitting from and contributing to the discourses of the team. In line with this, the artist will be expected to attend key activities, such as the yearly project symposiums, and negotiate inclusion in other relevant activities.

Artist Criteria

  • A commitment to collaborating with cross-disciplinary partners.
  • An ability to create artwork that reacts and responds to discourse and research information.
  • A track record of project management toward a public outcome.
  • A commitment to oversee the completion of a final artwork, and participate in activities around public engagement, feedback and legacy.
  • An engagement with the issue of climate change.

Aims

  • To test how scientific data is best embodied in an artwork; how can this be translated into affective processing?
  • Stimulate debate about the effects of, and our effect on, climate change
  • Create an artwork that will having a lasting effect on the viewer; provoke discussions about positive change.
  • Engage new audiences with both the thematic and contemporary art and climate change.
  • Attract audiences to the site of the artwork and augment Trondheim’s ambitious art in public spaces programme.

The following are of note:

  • The work will be semi-permanent (approximately one year) and may travel / be re-sited in other locations.
  • A public space in Trondheim will be the first location of the work. It is not necessary for the artist to identify a specific site, as this will be negotiated in partnership, but the commission should be considered for a high-traffic, public space, as opposed to an art gallery or museum.
  • The work can be exterior or interior. If exterior, there should be a realistic approach to the challenges posed by the Norwegian climate.
  • Additional platforms for the work, including on-line sites, mobile apps, etc are encouraged.
  • There is no specification regarding media, although the commission should aim to reflect sustainable methods of making, notably the proposal should not be environmentally damaging.

 Budget

  • Artists fee
  • Production and installation costs
  • Transport/delivery of work
  • Travel and accommodation expenses in relation to time spent in Norway (as negotiated)

TOTAL BUDGET: NK 550,000 (approx. 57.000 Euro)

 Eligibility

Applicants must have previous experience of collaborative working methods and experience in realising public art projects / commissions. A good level of English for communicating with the research team is essential.

To Apply

As the purpose of this commission is to appoint an artist to create a new work in response to on-going research, in the first instance, Climart is seeking ‘expressions of interest’ that demonstrate the artist criteria (outline in ‘About the Commission’ details).

Please submit an ‘Expression of Interest’ in the form of a single PDF in English language by 14th March 2016 adhering to the following format:

  •  Biographical Sketch (200 words)
  • To include, where relevant, how your practice relates to thematic of climate change
  • Your proposed approach to the commission and projected outcomes (300 words)
  • Please outline what methodologies and structures you may use to work with the Climart Project, giving where possible your ideas for potential artworks.
  • Images – up to 5 images (documented works, stills etc) of previous works.
  • CV including links to further reading, imagery, video etc

A shortlist of five proposals will be selected. Each shortlisted artist would be given NK 10,000 to work up a final proposal and to attend interviews, including travel.

 Expressions of interest are to be sent to climart@svt.ntnu.no within 14th March 2016 (23:59 CET).

Important note:

At the stage of “expressions of interest” no questions can be answered. Shortlisted artists will have the opportunity to ask questions until the 4th April 2016. After that date, no direct contact between submitting artists and the jury is allowed before the proposals have been submitted and evaluated by the jury. Questions must be sent in written form (email to climart@svt.ntnu.no,  not telephone) and answers + questions will be circulated to all shortlisted participants, to ensure that all are working with the same information.

MORE INFORMATION: http://www.climart.info/#!artist/cvz9

The post Opportunity for Artists: Climart Commission appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Green Arts Initiative Report Now Published!

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The GAI report showcases the work that Scottish artists and arts organisations have been doing to affect their carbon footprint and environmental sustainability, and highlights their plans for action over 2016.

GAI-Rosette-11 GAI-Rosette-4

In a year where the Green Arts Initiative doubled in its membership, the report highlights what our members have been doing to reduce their environmental impact, and they efforts they have gone to in order to extend environmental sustainability to their artists, audiences and staff members.

GAI-Rosette-8 GAI-Rosette-2

In October 2015 we hosted our first annual conference for GAI members, with over 20 speakers from the green arts community, and carried out a major survey to find out more about our members, and what help them achieve their sustainability goals. We learnt a huge amount the community, and have since planned a programme of resources and events over 2016 to help support our members.

Read the report to find out more!

Read the 2015 Green Arts Initiative Report

 


The Green Arts Initiative is a networked community of Scottish arts organisations committed to reducing their environmental impact, and exploring how the arts can contribute to a more sustainable Scotland. Find out more about the Green Arts Initiative, and become a member, here.

 

The post Green Arts Initiative Report Now Published! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Report on Mull Artists’ Residency 2015 Published

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

In March 2015, we invited twelve artists of different disciplines to join us for our second Arts & Sustainability Artists’ Residency. Stephanie de Roemer and Allison Palenske have produced a report for us reflecting on the events and outcomes of Mull 2015.

The residency was structured around a weekend-long discussion on the extraordinary and ambitious UN Sustainable Development Goals and aimed to:

  • Provide artists with the space and stimuli to consider how environmental sustainability could drive new ways of working;
  • Collectively develop artists’, Creative Carbon Scotland’s and Comar’s to think about how environmental sustainability can be engaged with in different artistic practices on practical and conceptual levels;
  • Nurture and build a creative community of practice which embeds environmental sustainability at its core.

mully.1 copyRead the full Mull Report 2015 here 

More information on the project and its outcomes here.

The twelve artists participating in the Mull 2015 Residency: Alice Cooper, performer/theatre maker;  Hannah Imlach, visual artist; Hector MacInnes, composer/musician; Holly Keasey, socially engaged visual artist; Jean Lanteri Laura, photographer; Kevin Dagg, sculptor; Niroshini Thambar, composer/musician; Rebecca Sharp, writer; Saffy Setohy, choreographer/dancer; Sam Cook, visual artist; Thomas Butler, composer and Vivian Ross Smith, visual artist.

The residency was facilitated by Professor Mike Bonaventura and documented by Stephanie de Roemer. The residency was supported by Comar and funded by Creative Scotland.

The post Report on Mull Artists’ Residency 2015 Published appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Open Call Artists’ Development Programme: Water & Ocean preservation

Artists’ Development Programme

(Artists’ residencies and mentoring) European Investment Bank Institute

Deadline for application: 28 February 2016 at midnight (GMT+1)

European Investment Bank Institute

98-100 Boulevard Konrad Adenauer L-2950 Luxembourg

Luxembourg www.eib.org

The European Investment Bank (EIB) Institute, in collaboration with Parley for the Oceans, is pleased to announce the 2016 edition of its Artists’ Development Programme (ADP), targeting ONE visual artist (aged less than 35) from EU Member States focusing on “Water & Ocean preservation”. The ADP provides an opportunity for emerging visual artists to develop their practice during a month- long residency in Luxembourg by creating a new (body of) work(s). During this time, they will be mentored by acclaimed British artist Darren Almond.

Eligibility

  • Less than 35 years of age at the time of application
  • EU nationality
  • Fluency in English

Budget and duration

The EIB Institute will take over the artist’s travel costs to and from Luxembourg, to include a stopover to visit Darren Almond in London. The artist will receive a stipend (EUR 100 per day) and will be provided a living/working space. At the end of the residency, the participant will receive a success fee of EUR 1,500, provided he/she has produced an artwork. The duration of the residency in Luxembourg will be one month in June 2016.

Upon completion of the residency, the EIB might acquire the artwork(s), which was (were) produced on site, from the artist.

Application procedure

Requirements

  • CV (in English)
  • Scanned copy of the passport or identity card of the applicant evidencing nationality of one of the 28 Member States
  • A paper detailing the project that would be produced during the residency, in line with the proposed theme (maximum 600 words, in English)
  • Portfolio of visual documentation of works best characterising the art of the applicant (in PDF, four A4 pages maximum)
  • Names and contact details of two professional referees, familiar with the art of the applicant
  • A brief reference in the body of the email to how the applicant found out about the programme

Selection procedure

A jury, consisting of members of the EIB Institute Arts Committee, external arts professionals and the mentor, will select the candidate based on the artistic quality of his/her work, motivation, potential to use the residency to maximum benefit and the relevance of the applicant’s practices to the cultural context of the EIB Institute.

The selected candidate will be informed of the jury’s result via email by beginning of April 2016.

Deadline for application: 28 February 2016 at midnight (GMT+1).

Any application which does not comply with the set requirements will be automatically eliminated.

The applications should be sent digitally to Ms. Delphine Munro (arts@eib.org)

About Darren Almond

About the European Investment Bank About the EIB Institute’s Arts programme About the ADP

About Parley

 

 

 

 

 

Executive Director Search for Forecast Public Art

Forecast Public Art has seen the interest and involvement in public art grow dramatically since 1978. After 38 years as founder and Executive Director, Jack Becker will transition to Director of Community Services, following the hire of a new Executive Director this year to lead one of the nation’s top nonprofit organizations dedicated to promoting the field of public art.

Forecast’s Community Services team will grow its role of helping artists and communities bring meaningful public art projects to life, and the Artists Services program, as well as Public Art Review will continue to provide support and resources that strengthen and advance the field of public art locally, nationally, and internationally. Forecast ED Search Press Release

The Executive Director is responsible for oversight of Forecast Public Art’s activities and staff in support of its mission. The ED leads the organization’s plans to achieve financial and fundraising goals, serving as its primary fundraiser, guiding strategic programmatic decisions, and developing and implementing long-range strategies for the organization. The ED also oversees development of editorial content, marketing and publishing, of the award-winning print and online magazine, Public Art Review, the world’s leading publication devoted to contemporary public art.

For a complete job description: forecastpublicart.org.

Open Call Artists’ Development Programme : The Imprint of Man – Representing the Anthropocene.

Artists’ Development Programme

(Artists’ residencies and mentoring) European Investment Bank Institute

Deadline for application: 21 February 2016 at midnight (GMT+1)

European Investment Bank Institute

  • Boulevard Konrad Adenauer L-2950 Luxembourg

www.eib.org

The European Investment Bank (EIB) Institute is pleased to announce the 2016 edition of its Artists’ Development Programme (ADP), targeting ONE visual artist (aged less than 35) from EU Member States focusing on “The Imprint of Man – Representing the Anthropocene”.

The ADP provides an opportunity for emerging visual artists to develop their practice during a month-long residency in Luxembourg by creating a new (body of) work(s). During this time, they will be mentored by acclaimed British artist Darren Almond.

Eligibility

  • Less than 35 years of age at the time of application
  • EU nationality
  • Fluency in English

Budget and duration

The EIB Institute will take over the artist’s travel costs to and from Luxembourg, to include a stopover to visit Darren Almond in London. The artist will receive a stipend (EUR 100 per day) and will be provided a living/working space. At the end of the residency, the participant will receive a success fee of EUR 1,500, provided he/she has produced an artwork. The duration of the residency in Luxembourg will be one month in June 2016.

Upon completion of the residency, the EIB might acquire the artwork(s), which was (were) produced on site, from the artist.

Application procedure

Requirements

  • CV (in English)
  • Scanned copy of the passport or identity card of the applicant evidencing nationality of one of the 28 Member States
  • A paper detailing the project that would be produced during the residency, in line with the proposed theme (maximum 600 words, in English)
  • Portfolio of visual documentation of works best characterising the art of the applicant (in PDF, four A4 pages maximum)
  • Names and contact details of two professional referees, familiar with the art of the applicant
  • A brief reference in the body of the email to how the applicant found out about the programme

Selection procedure

A jury, consisting of members of the EIB Institute Arts Committee, external arts professionals and the mentor, will select the candidate based on the artistic quality of his/her work, motivation, potential to use the residency to maximum benefit and the relevance of the applicant’s practices to the cultural context of the EIB Institute.

The selected candidate will be informed of the jury’s result via email by beginning of April 2016.

Deadline for application: 21 February 2016 at midnight (GMT+1).

Any application which does not comply with the set requirements will be automatically eliminated.

The applications should be sent digitally to Ms. Delphine Munro (arts@eib.org)

About Darren Almond

About the European Investment Bank

 

About the EIB Institute’s Arts programme

 

About the ADP

 

 

 

Soil Culture Bringing the Arts down to Earth

Initiated by the Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World (CCANW), Soil Culture is a three year programme which reveals how arts and culture explore the vital, ecological importance of soil.

Soil Culture demonstrates the UK contribution to the United Nations International Year of Soils, 2015. The programme consists of various events, in particular 12 artist residencies (featuring Touchstone Collaborations, Bristol, and Karen Guthrie, among others) aimed at encouraging an exploration of the ecology and importance of soil.

The project has climaxed with a major group exhibition, Soil Culture: Deep Roots (Falmouth Art Gallery and Plymouth Peninsula Arts in 2015/16), which brings together the work of six important international environmental artists: Paolo Barrile, Mel Chin, herman de vries, Richard Long, Ana Mendieta, and Claire Pentecost.

The range of artworks includes work by Mel Chin, who uses plants to extract heavy metals from contaminated land, to that of Claire Pentecost who has sculpted soil into the shapes of gold ingots to reflect its true worth. Also featured are works by seven British artists, including Chris Drury, Andy Goldsworthy, and David Nash.

A Gaia Project and CCANW co-publication, this book documents all aspects of the Soil Culture programme and features exclusive essays.

– See more at: http://www.cornerhousepublications.org/publications/soil-culture-bringing-the-arts-down-to-earth/#sthash.Ae0v2gGa.dpuf

Symposium: Language, Landscape and the Sublime

29/06/2016 – 30/06/2015

This two-day symposium draws together artists and thinkers from a wide range of disciplines to explore ways in which landscape –– and the ways we represent it –– connects deeply to our lives and underpins our relationship to the world.

The programme is now emerging and much of can be seen here. Places are going fast, but some regular tickets still remain. The price goes up after the end of February, so book now to get the best price.

Day 1 of the symposium takes place at Dartington Hall; the second day happens there also, with parallel sessions happening at nearbySharpham House. Find out more about the venues here. Unless you have your own car, you’ll have to choose between one or the other for the second day, so we’ve attempted to theme the sessions to help you choose. The Symposium takes places in one of the most beautiful parts of England, so stay the weekend and enjoy!

There is an associated residential short course being offered the week before the symposium, with poet Fiona Benson, sound artist Richard Povall and special guest artist Garry Fabian Miller. Find out more here.<

See more at: http://languagelandscape.info