Monthly Archives: April 2021

Green Tease Reflections: Embedded

16th March 2021: This Green Tease event explored the topic of ’embedded artists’ who work closely with or within environmental organisations to help further, diversify, challenge or reorient their work. Film-maker Janine Finlay and artist Emma Hislop discussed their experiences working with Zero Waste Scotland and the Ellen Macarthur Foundation, followed by focused group discussions. 

The event started with a quick icebreaker. Attendees were asked to think of films – environmental or otherwise – that had affected them particularly powerfully or altered their perception of an issue. The suggestions were saved to be reused for an activity later on in the session.

Green Tease Reflections: Embedded 1
Speakers

Gemma Lawrence of Creative Carbon Scotland then provided an introduction to the concept of ’embedded artists’ and discussed the role she plays in setting up and supporting projects that involve embedded artists. This was followed by a conversation with Janine Finlay, who was embedded artist with Zero Waste Scotland’s ‘Demystifying Decoupling’ project. and Emma Hislop, who was the first artist-in-residence with the Ellen Macarthur Foundation. The conversation is available as a video with a summary of key topics below.

Gemma stressed that embedded artist projects tend to be process oriented, focusing on collaboration over an extended timescale with outcomes not being predetermined. The aim is for artists to meaningfully contribute to the running of an environmental organisation, offering the skills that come from their experience and training to find creative ways of tackling seemingly intractable issues.

The slides from her talk are available here and more information about Creative Carbon Scotland’s work on embedded artists is available on the project webpage.

Emma discussed the importance of complexity and strangeness as a means of opening up space for alternative forms of understanding and perception that would not be encountered elsewhere. Her practice is research focused and involves developing stories that combine elements of familiarity and strangeness, drawing on sci fi, alchemy, and pop culture. One example involves drawing parallels between gut disease and environmental crisis, creating unexpected juxtapositions.

As artist-in-residence with Ellen Macarthur Foundation, she created the website Open Tongue that documented her experiences, and the piece Plaeriet for Aether, which involved a script bound to include fungal spores that will eventually consume the object. She discussed the importance of legacy in her work and discussed how she was able to help shape the format of the residency for future artists.

Janine talked about her interest in stories and visual media. Her work has involved creating science and nature documentaries for the BBC and for the World Wildlife Fund as well as character-focused documentaries. She explained the importance of films for demonstrating realities to people who have never witnessed them in person: for example, showing decision-makers places that their decisions influence but that they never visit in person.

As filmmaker with Zero Waste Scotland she  had to grapple with explaining the concept of ‘decoupling‘ (achieving economic growth without increased environmental damage) in an accessible way as well as working during COVID-19, which has complicated the process of building relationships. The upcoming film will combine input from researchers and from members of the public.

The ensuing conversation focused on the process of collaboration and the need to develop good relationships, which can involve navigating contrasting value systems or terminology. The artists stressed the importance of taking time to develop good personal relationships and valuing contrasting ways of thinking.

An embedded artist can usefully ‘disrupt’ an organisation to help enable new directions, so their role should not necessarily be to simply follow a brief but could be to productively question the aims of the organisation. Gemma discussed the importance of having an ‘anchoring phase’ that lays the groundwork in advance to build support and minimise misconceptions of what to expect.

Discussion

This was followed by time in smaller group discussions. Participants first returned to the film suggestions from the start of the session and analysed them with the aid of a guide prepared by Janine to gain a better understanding of what devices they thought made these films effective. They then turned to their own experiences as artists or environmental practitioners to consider where they might be able to employ similar methods in their work or what issues that they work with might benefit most from being presented creatively.

Finally, the discussion turned to practicalities, drawing on the Embedded Artist Project Toolkit developed by the Cultural Adaptations project to think about key questions for setting up collaborative embedded artist projects, such as:

  • What change are you trying to bring about?
  • What issue are you responding to?
  • How can you develop bold new approaches?
  • How can you leave space for the project to develop?
  • How can you ensure that the project is genuinely co-designed?
  • Who are your audiences and stakeholders?
  • How can you make the best use of the skills held by different collaborators?
  • How will you know if you have been successful?

Some of the answers to these questions suggested by participants are given below.

Green Tease Reflections: Embedded

The post Green Tease Reflections: Embedded appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Job: Creative producer (early career)

We are recruiting a creative producer (early career) to help us deliver our Culture Collective project.

This role will support the delivery of the Culture Collective project and the creative community workers who are part of it, as well as learn about community arts practice and producing skills. They will also contribute creatively.

This role is imagined for an early career artist with a desire to widen their skills and experience, or an early career community or arts worker looking to bring their creative skills to contribute to wider society. You might be someone with climate change experience wanting to bring your knowledge to a community setting. This post could support a recent graduate, someone looking for a career change, or a first foot in the door working in the cultural sector. We are looking for a people person who is both organised and creative, has a desire to learn and make a difference.

Fee and support
The creative producer (early career) post is offered as a freelance contract for six months full-time with a total fee of £12,874, paid in monthly instalments in arrears. The contract can be flexible and spread out part-time for a year.

The post will be supported by Open Road and a dedicated project coordinator who will provide oversight and guidance, as well as a dedicated Trustee of the Fittie Community Development Trust (FCDT). There will be regular individual and project meetings and project planning includes a budget to create events and activities. Studio and working space can be made available if required.

The deadline for applications is 5pm Monday 3rd May 2021.

Interviews will take place the week beginning 10th May 2021 and will be in person if restrictions allow or online.

The envisaged start date for the roles is June 2021.

For further information and details on how to apply see the information about Culture Collective on the Open Road website.

Please email for a copy of the recruitment document.

The post Job: Creative producer (early career) appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Job: Three creative community workers

We are recruiting three creative community workers to work with us and the Fittie Community Development Trust (FCDT) to deliver our Culture Collective project.

These roles are imagined for experienced artists and creative practitioners who are looking to bring their creative skills to contribute to wider society. The three posts are:

  1. The Fittie community: This post will create a programme of creative initiatives and participatory events to bring the Hall and community connections back to life.
  2. Visitors and migration: This post will further a project focusing on stories of migration in Aberdeen, linking with visitors, other harbourside communities and Aberdeen Harbour.
  3. Climate Ready community: This post will focus on the impacts of climate change for coastal communities and the transition to net-zero carbon emissions, including community-owned energy.

Each creative community worker post is offered as a freelance contract for six months full-time with a total fee of £18,932 each, paid in monthly instalments in arrears. Contracts are flexible and can be spread out part-time over a year. Joint or group applications for each post are welcome. Applicants are asked to state which post they are applying for but can apply for more than one within the same application. No applicant will be offered more than one post.

All posts will be supported by Open Road and a dedicated project coordinator who will provide oversight and guidance, as well as a dedicated Trustee of the FCDT.

The deadline for applications is 5pm Monday 3rd May 2021.

Interviews will take place the week beginning 10th May 2021 and will be in person if restrictions allow or online.

The envisaged start date for the roles is June 2021.

For further information and details on how to apply see the information about Culture Collective on the Open Road website.

Please email for a copy of the recruitment document.

The post Job: Three creative community workers appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Video and Sound Installations Incorporating Renewable Energy

By Chris Meigh-Andrews

In the period between January and April 1994, while I was Artist in Residence in Digital Imaging in the School of Visual Arts, Music and Publishing at Oxford Brookes University, I developed Perpetual Motion, a gallery-based installation presenting a computer animation of a flying kite powered via a wind turbine. After its initial exhibition in Oxford, this work was subsequently exhibited at the Saw Contemporary Arts Centre in Ottawa (1994), and at the Castlefield Gallery, Manchester (1996). This early work initiated a series of installations, presented within a “white cube” gallery setting and outside in the landscape, in which renewable energy systems were integral to the themes and functioning of the work and to the ethos and concerns of my approach to working with moving image and sound technologies. Since then I have continued to work with renewable energy within gallery spaces and at outside locations as a way of establishing relationships with the natural environment and highlighting the flow and transformation of energy from one form to another.

Perpetual Motion (1994), Saw Gallery, Ottawa, Canada

For example, Mothlight (1998), exhibited at the Museum of Natural History in Pisa, Glass Box Gallery in Salford and at the Rich Women of Zurich, London, featured halogen lamps, solar panels and video monitors in dynamic counter-balance. Mothlight sought ways to highlight the interdependence of the elements which were at the core of the work – a repeating cycle of computer-generated fluttering moths and suspended solar-powered video screens illuminated by halogen lamps that were interconnected to form an interrelated cycle of meaning. Light was an important theme in this work; illuminating, powering, and conceptually connecting the images and objects within the work. My interest in the relationship between technology and nature was a major concern. In Mothlight the use of “renewable resources” was intended to be subversive; solar panels were not simply used to generate electricity but to act as passive conductors which were transducing light from the domestic main’s power point. In my thinking at the time, I felt that by inverting the “conventional” application of renewable energy, I was serving the poetic rather than the technological.

In 2002, my solar-powered digital video installation For William Henry Fox Talbot (The Pencil of Nature) was commissioned for “Digital Interventions” at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. Electricity produced from a solar panel was harnessed to power a digital video camera focused on the large latticed window first photographed by Will Henry Fox Talbot in 1835. The image from the digital camera was composed to exactly reproduce Fox Talbot’s pioneering “photogenic drawing,” the world’s earliest surviving photograph. This digital facsimile was relayed via an ISDN phone line from Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire to the museum in London, the resultant “live” digital image presenting a full-size image of the historic window in “real time.”

In 1994, with research funding from National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA), I developed Interwoven Motion, an outdoor self-powered (solar and wind) video installation for the “Foundation for Art & Creative Technology” (FACT) with support from Grizedale Arts and the UK Forestry Commission. At the edge of a wooded area, a large tree was temporarily equipped with four video cameras arranged around the trunk at the height of approximately eight meters. The images produced by the cameras were relayed via a switcher to a weatherproof LCD video display at the base of the tree. The speed and direction of the image flow was determined by the velocity and direction of the wind. The system was powered by a wind turbine extended beyond the height of the forest canopy and four solar panels mounted within the tree itself.

Resurrection (2004), Saint James Cavalier, Valletta, Malta

In 2005-2006, I produced Resurrection, a solar-powered video installation for “Digital Discourse,” in Valletta. A dead tree, complete with roots (approximately 20-feet high), was cut in half, the root end mounted in the center of the floor at one end of the gallery. The upturned tree and roots were lit by halogen lamps with forty-five individual miniature solar panels arranged irregularly on the roots. Video images of fluttering leaves were projected onto paper “leaves” arranged on the dead branches. Resurrection presented a record of a previously living existence recreated via technology. The energy used to bring the tree back to life was transformed within the gallery space from electricity to light and back again, the shimmering leaves experienced as both light reflectors and light receptors, the solar panels as both surrogate leaves and transforming technology.

SunBeam (2011), University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK

In 2011, I developed SunBeam, an outdoor event featuring high-definition video images of the sun from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory projected at night onto a large solar array. My aspirations for this work were related to ideas and concerns linking it to my previous renewable energy installation projects. As Dr. Charlie Gere, professor of media theory and history at the University of Lancaster has observed, SunBeam brought me closer to my conceptual goal of producing a technological artwork which attempted to integrate the source of its energy with the images it presents, celebrating the harmonious relationship between light, energy and the fluid nature of matter in general:

In SunBeam, Meigh-Andrews now perhaps realises what the earlier works hinted at, an artwork which both represents the prodigious energy of the sun and performs its effects by using that energy to make the representation possible…That the energy harvested during the day can then be used to make an artwork possible beautifully encapsulates (Georges) Bataille’s notion of art as a form of general economy exemplified in the sun itself. The system that harnesses the sun’s extraordinary power for straightforward and restricted uses, such as supplying energy to the university and to the national grid, is ‘detourned’ to produce a work of art, or in other words something useless according to the restricted economy of reciprocity and exchange. This is, perhaps, the very definition of art itself.

— Charles Gere, “Solar: Chris Meigh-Andrews’ Sunbeam

Aeolian Processes II (2014), Long Reef, Sydney, Australia

I have continued working with renewable energy in an ongoing series of sculptural works entitled Impossible Objects (2015-2021). Although these pieces have much in common with earlier works in that they often incorporate or feature renewable energy components in order to make connections to themes of flow and flux, they are also more directly centered on notions of “process.” They are “Impossible Objects” not because they cannot exist (as they clearly do), but because they make use of, or refer to, a process that contains a contradiction or presents an “impossible” idea. They are representations of a state or situation that cannot be achieved, except through the processes and agency of art. In this respect, I have been influenced in part by the “Mono-ha” works of the Korean artist Lee Ufan, in which there is an encounter between different materials – “a relationship of tension” in which the work is the site of the encounter. In common with my approach to the large-scale installations, all of these “Impossible Objects” are hybrid installation/sculptures made using domestic technology – temporary assemblages made using readily available materials and equipment.

(Top image: SunBeam (2011), installing the screen on solar panel.)

______________________________

Chris Meigh-Andrews is an artist, writer, and curator who has been making and exhibiting screen-based video and sculptural moving image installations since the mid-1970s. He studied fine art at Goldsmiths and completed his PhD at the Royal College of Art in 2001. He is Emeritus Professor of Electronic and Digital Art, University of Central Lancashire and was Visiting Professor at the Centre for Moving Image Research, University of the West of England, 2013-2016. He has held a number of artist’s residencies in the UK and abroad and his site-specific and commissioned installations often incorporate renewable energy systems.

———-

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Powered by WPeMatico

An Interview with Sam Pelts

By Amy Brady

This month I have for you an interview with Sam Pelts, a founding organizer of EXTRACTION: Art on the Edge of the Abyss. The project’s goal is to encourage individual artists as well as museums and galleries across the country and around to the world to schedule art installations, book readings, and public programming that speak to themes of extraction. 

As explained in the project’s impressive catalogue, extractive industries have led to some of the biggest problems our planet faces, including climate change; the deterioration of land, water, and air; the devastation and displacement of vulnerable communities; and much else. The project’s participating artists and institutions make those links clear in their art.

I spoke with Sam about why he and his colleagues launched EXTRACTION, the artists involved, and his thoughts on the roles that art and writing can play in our global fight against climate change.

Tell me more about EXTRACTION: Art on the Edge of the Abyss. What is it, and what are its goals?

EXTRACTION: Art on the Edge of the Abyss is a multimedia, multi-venue, cross-border art movement which seeks to provoke change by exposing and interrogating the negative social and environmental consequences of industrialized natural resource extraction. Essentially, we are a global coalition of artists and creators committed to shining a light on all forms of extractive industry – from mining and drilling to the reckless plundering and exploitation of fresh water, fertile soil, timber, marine life, and innumerable other resources across the globe. The Extraction Project will culminate in a constellation of over fifty overlapping exhibitions, performances, installations, site-specific work, land art, street art, publications, poetry readings, and cross-media events throughout 2021 and beyond.

In effect, the project is about harnessing the power of artistic expression to raise a ruckus about one of the most pressing environmental concerns of our time – the suicidal overconsumption of our planet’s resources. We’re thinking of “extractivism” as being at the root of almost every other environmental problem, including climate change. Given that the history of the extractive industry is one of untold suffering and damage inflicted on fenceline communities – disproportionately communities of color and Indigenous people – the need to include and lift up those voices is also critical to the story we’re trying to tell. The fight for the future of our planet cannot be won if it is left for scientists and policymakers alone, nor should the frontline soldiering be left to those vulnerable, disadvantaged, or disenfranchised communities who have no other choice than to resist as a matter of survival. Artists have a unique set of tools with which to engage these issues.

EXTRACTION Catalog and Exhibition Guide, published by the CODEX Foundation, 2020. Cover image: Léonie Pondevie, Carrière de clisson, 2019, digital photograph. Available at all participating Extraction Art venues.

What is your role in the project? And how did you get involved?

The Extraction Project was started in 2017 by two old friends from Montana: Edwin Dobb, a writer and environmental journalist for National Geographic and Harper’s Weekly; and Peter Koch, a letterpress printer, book artist, and founder of the CODEX Foundation, an arts nonprofit dedicated to elevating the art of fine bookmaking. I was brought on a year later to help figure out the logistics of getting the project off the ground – things like designing and maintaining our website and organizing our crowdfunding campaign.

My role in the project shifted pretty dramatically in 2019 when Ed tragically passed away, just a few weeks after Peter had been temporarily put out of commission by cancer treatments. Suddenly I looked around and realized that if this project was really going to get off the ground, then it was more-or-less up to me to make it happen. Taking on that central role was challenging at first, but I subsequently learned that organizing and coordinating this project – which allowed me to communicate directly with hundreds of artists and learn about and promote their art – was work I greatly enjoyed doing! I also felt that the best way for me to honor Ed’s life would be to help make his vision of a global art movement in defense of the planet – our only home – a reality.

Now that the wheels are in motion, the project has become much more decentralized and the artists and exhibition spaces who are involved are free to participate and collaborate as they see fit.

Who else do you hope gets involved with this project?

Anyone who wants to participate in the Extraction Project can be a part of it. You certainly don’t have to be a famous artist to get involved! I subscribe to the belief that not everyone has to be a climate scientist for us to collectively address climate change. Maybe you’re a painter or a storyteller. Everyone has their own skills and talents, and we can all respond to environmental issues by simply doing what each one of us is already good at.

We believe artists have a crucial role to play in sounding the alarm, bearing witness, and inspiring action. For those suffering from climate grief or eco-anxiety, making art may also serve a therapeutic role. Your way of being a part of the Extraction Project could be as simple as making art that helps you come to terms with the sense of loss you’re feeling about the changes our planet is undergoing. Anyone from the amateur to the virtuoso can post their artwork on Instagram with the hashtag #ExtractionArt.

Maybe it sounds a bit overly ambitious, but I would personally like to see literally every artistic person who cares about the environment get involved in this project. The whole point of Extraction: Art on the Edge of the Abyss is to bring our voices together as one, signal boosting each other while at the same time building out a massive network and infrastructure of resources and potential like-minded collaborators.

Why is art and writing about climate change important? Can it show us something that other mediums can’t?

We recognize the unique power of artistic expression to evoke a more visceral and emotional response than, for instance, a peer-reviewed study or a set of statistics or graphs from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Most people understand the Greenhouse Effect on an intellectual level, and thus are able to recognize the logical connection between oil extraction – and subsequent greenhouse gas emissions from carbon burning – and the impact those processes have on global temperatures. But a lot of folks have not tried to come to terms with these largely invisible scientific phenomena on an emotional level. And when it hits you, it’s really intense, and can be quite motivating for many people. Young people get it, which is why they are out in the streets, striking. For some people it’s seeing polar bears stranded on icebergs, but for me, seeing aerial photographs of the Athabasca Tar Sands mines in Alberta, Canada can bring me nearly to tears.

Consider this idea of “the abyss” that’s in our project’s name – obviously a metaphor for the point of no return when it comes to acting on climate change. Science might be able to tell us the diameter of the abyss, how far away it is, and how fast we are heading toward it, but if you want to really look into the abyss and confront it with your whole being, you need art.

What are some of the themes that have emerged in the art and writing associated with the Extraction project? Did any of them surprise you?

The idea of “bearing witness” to these environmental injustices is certainly a common thread that weaves its way through many artists’ work. I was surprised to see the extent to which so many of these extraction sites are virtually invisible (except to those who know where to look), despite being close enough to cause major harm to fenceline communities. Shining a spotlight on these sites and facilities and putting them on display for everyone to see is a great way to short circuit the kind of “greenwashing” that the PR departments for extractive companies have become experts at in recent years. I mentioned the Tar Sands earlier. Just to continue with that example, I believe that if everyone on the planet was confronted with images of what tar sands mining does to the land and ecosystem of the boreal forests of Northern Canada, they would be shut down almost immediately. If everyone could see with their own eyes the massive tailings ponds, filled with enough toxic waste material to create a river of sludge 2,000 miles long, fossil fuels would be banned tomorrow.

Another theme that struck me was how much hope artists still have for the future. For every aerial photograph of an open pit mine, there is a vision for a better path forward. It’s worth remembering that while we may be dancing at the edge of the abyss, we have not yet fallen into it, and there is still a massive opportunity to change course, particularly over the next decade, which is crucial. To quote Rachel Carson: “The more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders and realities of the universe about us, the less taste we shall have for destruction.”

What’s next for Extraction and for you personally? Anything you’d like my readers to watch for?

I’d personally like to keep the project going as long as possible. If we get enough support, maybe it will become a biennial thing. In the near term, our website has information about all the upcoming exhibitions across the country and overseas. Shows and events will be happening all throughout this year, and chances are there will be at least one Extraction exhibition within driving distance for most of your readers. Folks can learn more at www.extractionart.org. The CODEX Foundation, which supports the Extraction Project as our fiscal sponsor, is also planning a wrap-up symposium called CODEX Yellowstone, and that will take place in September of 2022 in Bozeman, Montana. If your readers have questions they can also email me at sam@codexfoundation.org.

(Top image: Garth Lenz, Tar Mine and Roads, Northern Alberta, Canada, 2010, photograph)

This article is part of the Climate Art Interviews series. It was originally published in Amy Brady’s “Burning Worlds” newsletter. Subscribe to get Amy’s newsletter delivered straight to your inbox.

___________________________

Amy Brady is the Deputy Publisher of Guernica magazine and Senior Editor of the Chicago Review of Books. Her writing about art, culture, and climate has appeared in the Village Voice, the Los Angeles TimesPacific Standard, the New Republic, and other places. She is also the editor of the monthly newsletter “Burning Worlds,” which explores how artists and writers are thinking about climate change. She holds a PHD in English and is the recipient of a CLIR/Mellon Library of Congress Fellowship. Read more of her work at AmyBradyWrites.com at and follow her on Twitter at @ingredient_x.

———-

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Young Writers Program 2021 by Mindselo (YWPM 2021)

Mindselo is a personal growth platform that seeks to transform ideas into wisdom. They want to create conscious minds connected to the world through their education system. 

Young Writers Program 2021 is a unique initiative by Mindselo where they are inviting writers, bloggers, journalists and other conscious minds to express their unique ideas on various topics in the form of a blog or article.

Through this program, they aim to build a community of passionate and conscious minds who can contribute to making this world a better place with their skills.

Benefits of participating in the Young Writers Program 2021 include:

  • Winners of this program will receive a unique title – Mindselo Bloggers.
  • The best submissions will be featured on the Mindselo official website, reaching a global audience.
  • Winners will gain access to the Mindselo Creators Program.
  • Winner will receive certification and many other future opportunities.

Eligibility requirements:

  • Proven ability to tell rich stories in words, video or both.
  • The blog or article should be written in Hindi or English.
  • The word limit is 250 words minimum and 1000 words maximum.
  • The article should be the author’s original work and should not be published anywhere else in any form.
  • There are no age restrictions.
  • All regions are eligible.

Application Process:

  1. Write a powerful and unique blog or article on the given topics.
  2. Submit your article using the registration link.

The deadline for submissions is 2nd July 2021.

For more information, please email Aman Kumar or phone on +919557178303.

The post Opportunity: Young Writers Program 2021 by Mindselo (YWPM 2021) appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Ocean ARTic – call for residency applications

Two residencies, likely to lead to commissions, where art and marine climate science will mingle.

We are inviting applications from creative practitioners – ideally a mix of visual and sound artists – for a data-led, innovative and potentially technological approach. There will be two residencies available, to start in May 2021. Successful applicants will be paired with a marine scientist to work collaboratively in developing a creative response to the marine science and data about climate change in the Arctic and its consequences there and at lower latitudes.

This project is led by MASTS, the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland, with the Blue Action research project and Creative Informatics as key project partners. The project timing is deliberately falling in a pivotal year for climate change negotiations at COP26, and the start of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030). We are developing an ambitious programme for exhibition and public-sharing of the resulting works from September 2021.

Full details, guidelines and an online application form are available on the Ocean ARTic webpage. In the context of COVID-19 risks and restrictions, these ‘residencies’ will be online for collaborative interactions. However, we have reserved some budget for potential travel and subsistence if circumstances allow, and will keep the situation under review.

The deadline is 17:00 Wednesday 28th April 2021.

The post Opportunity: Ocean ARTic – call for residency applications appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: UNFIX 2021 at the Barn residency

One week paid residency at the Barn between 7-13 June, as part of UNFIX Festival 2021.

The Barn is pleased to be partnering with UNFIX festival to offer a residency to Scotland-based artists at the Barn, Banchory, Aberdeenshire.

The Barn has a rich history of exploratory work in art and ecology. Our activities include live performances, projects and presentations across all art forms, intending to reach a diverse audience. For 2021, we have partnered with UNFIX festival, Scotland’s leading festival of performance and ecology, to deliver a residency at the Barn. This will take place between the 7-13 June 2021.

The week-long residency will be financially supported and we are looking for artists at all stages of the practice. We are particularly interested in hearing from artists working in contemporary performance, interdisciplinary practice, dance, moving image and live art.

The outcomes of this residency will be shared as part of UNFIX festival 2021 and we are interested in receiving proposals that bear COVID-19 restrictions in mind. This may include but is not limited to the realisation of existing ideas, virtual sharing or work-in-progress sessions (live or pre-recorded), artist-to-artist conversations, blog posts or reflections, moving image, audio works, podcasts, self-directed scores, postal projects and more.

Priority will be given to proposals that have clearly outlined and developed how the audience will interact with the work as part of the festival.

To apply, please visit the Barn’s website where you will find information on what we are looking for, what the residency will offer and full guidelines.

The application deadline is 5pm 16th April 2021.

The post Opportunity: UNFIX 2021 at the Barn residency appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Ecosystems Services and Gaelic Report published

NatureScot recently published a report on the relevance of Gaelic language, place names, literature and song, tradition and folklore to assessing ecosystem services. This is a very significant development in approaching ecosystem service assessment through a cultural lens, understanding that culture is not just tourism and beauty spots, but is the articulation of values, uses and meanings.

The Gaelic heritage of Scotland, despite being largely ignored by authorities and academics concerned with land and marine management, has much to offer those who seek to analyse how Scottish ecosystems might, and do, provide services to the population of the country and beyond. The Gaelic language, and its attendant culture and heritage give a unique and informative window on the landscape and natural ecosystems, and human interactions with both, in the Scottish Highlands, over a very long period, and therefore possess relevance for the Scottish people’s collective view of their land and its management, now and in the future. In this scoping report, the author explores Gaelic toponymy, literature and oral tradition, as they impinge upon Ecosystem Services, and makes twenty recommendations for future, detailed research on these issues

RESEARCH REPORT NO. 1230 ‘ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AND GAELIC: A SCOPING EXERCISE’

The next challenge is to explore how contemporary artists are involved in this. Artists across every artform as well as designers are engaged in the cultural ways of understanding ecosystems. Prof Murdo Macdonald explored Gaelic, colour and the indigenous plant life of Scotland in a paper given to the Black Wood of Rannoch Workshop, Kinloch Rannoch, 22 November 2013 organised by Collins and Goto working with Forest Research.

He concludes saying, 

To use another phrase from Gregory Bateson, ‘mind and nature’, what I have argued here is that, whether one looks at the Gaelic alphabet with its botanical references, or the landscape subtlety of Gaelic colour words, the Gaelic language facilitates the understanding of ‘mind and nature’ as integral to one another.

HTTPS://MURDOMACDONALD.WORDPRESS.COM/ALPHABET-COLOUR-GAIDHEALTACHD-AN-ECOLOGY-OF-MIND/

image from Alec Finlay/Gathering website

One example is poet and visual artist Alec Finlay – his work Gathering is just one example. 

Gathering is an innovative mapping of the Highland landscape in poems, essays, photographs, and maps, conceived by Scottish artist and poet Alec Finlay. The work guides the reader to modest and forgotten places in this complex region.

Finlay worked from Adam Watson’s published collection of names, one of the most significant modern contributions to Scottish folk-culture consisting of over 7,000 local place-names, covering every ruined farm, shieling, hill, glen, spring, burn, and wood in the region. Over a period of years, Finlay expanded Watson’s catalogue into a generous ‘ecopoetic’ and ‘place-aware’ account of the Cairngorms, accompanied by photographs showing the hills in all their seasonal variety. Essays guide the reader to names that reveal the haunts of wolves and wildcats, and cast a vivid impression of the great pinewoods that once grew there, and may again.

HTTP://GATHERING-ALECFINLAY.BLOGSPOT.COM/

screenshot from Mapping the Sea website

Another is Stephen Hurrel and Dr Ruth Brennan’s Mapping the Sea project which also focuses on place names and the seascape.

The idea of a dynamic map – to reflect intergenerational knowledge, fishermen’s ways of knowing the sea and the intangible cultural heritage* of the marine environment – had been discussed by Brennan and MacKinnon, and Hurrel proposed the idea of an interactive digital map. This was subsequently developed by Hurrel and Brennan as a way of bringing to life, and making visible, what is often invisible to most people.

HTTP://WWW.MAPPINGTHESEA.NET/BARRA/

There are many other examples of these approaches which need to inform ecosystem service assessment processes.

——

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Glenn Adamson: “Craft in America: Real and Ideal”

University of Oregon
Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

Glenn Adamson: “Craft in America: Real and Ideal”
Co-sponsored by the MFA Applied Craft + Design at PNCA

Thursday, April 8, 3:00 p.m.
Free, via Zoom, with registration.join a livestream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Drawing from his new book, Craft: An American History, Glenn Adamson will engage in conversation with Anya Kivarkis. They will discuss the implication of race, gender and class in US craft history, and focus particularly on the relationship between craft’s economic and material presence, and its rich symbolic dimension. There are important differences between real and ideal, yet each influences the other in a complex exchange.

Glenn Adamson is a curator, writer and historian based in New York. He has previously been Director of the Museum of Arts and Design; Head of Research at the V&A; and Curator at the Chipstone Foundation in Milwaukee. Adamson’s publications include Thinking Through Craft (2007); The Craft Reader (2010); Postmodernism: Style and Subversion (2011, co-edited with Jane Pavitt); The Invention of Craft (2013); Art in the Making (2016, co-authored with Julia Bryan-Wilson; and Fewer Better Things: The Hidden Wisdom of Objects (2018). His newest book is Craft: An American History, published by Bloomsbury, and he is co-host of the online interview series Design in Dialogue.

Above images : 1.) FISK poster design  2.)  “Craft: An American History” by Glenn Adamson


Visit “5 Minutes” for interviews with Visiting Artists by UO Art MFA candidates.
Explore 10+ years of Visiting Artist lecture videos on the UO Channel.
Join the Department of ArtCenter for Art Research, and School of Art + Design on Instagram.