Monthly Archives: June 2021

Art and the World After This

In Art and the World After This, Metcalf Innovation Fellow David Maggs outlines four interrelated disruptions faced by Canada’s non-profit arts sector and identifies the unique value art brings to society. As an artist, academic, and sustainability scholar, Maggs brings a unique perspective to the subject of disruption and transformation. The report is informed by consultations and conversations with numerous arts workers, funders, and academics from across the country and beyond.

Collectively, we are facing the disruption of activity, stemming from COVID-19; the disruption of society, emerging from ballooning social unrest; the disruption of industry forced by the digital revolution; and finally, the disruption of world, rooted in the existential threat of the climate crisis. Maggs explores how the arts can serve a more applied and accountable role in society as a catalyst for meeting the profound challenges we face. The report makes the case for how this must be done not by instrumentalizing the arts, but by the arts doing that which only the arts can do.

To proactively tackle the world’s complexity, Maggs argues for a shift towards a system-approach across the arts sector that can enable innovation and learning through a direct relationship to research and development (R&D). He introduces us to the idea of the complexity economy and asks us to consider three questions:

  1. What are we doing here anyway? To prepare for deep transformative change, this first question attempts to identify the arts sector’s essential value proposition.
  2. Is this an ecosystem or a zoo? The shift from a paradigm of ‘production and presentation’ to innovation will require adopting an integrated systems-approach.
  3. Can we learn our way out of this? This question considers the broad issue of the arts sector’s capacity to learn, especially through the lens of R&D.

Driven by a sense of urgency and optimism, Art and the World After This makes the case for grounding the arts firmly in action as a powerful force for creating a better world.

The report can be downloaded here.

Opportunity: NYT Climate Hub open house

The New York Times Climate Hub is calling for proposals for an Open House Day on Sunday 7th November.

The Climate Hub, which will be located on the site of SWG3 in Glasgow throughout COP26, is planning an Open House Day where they hope to provide a platform specific to Scottish voices and climate initiatives, accessible to all. Open House Day will showcase how the people of Scotland are working together to fight Climate change.

The ask: They’re keen to hear your ideas of how they can use the space to highlight Scottish projects, installations and initiatives. If you have a suggestion, please fill in this form by Friday 25th June.

If you have any questions, please contact Louise Hunter: louisehunter@summerhousemedia.com

The New York Times Climate Hub is an expansive event dedicated to sparking vital conversations about the most pressing climate issues of our day and making actionable plans for what’s ahead.

The post Opportunity: NYT Climate Hub open house appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Conscient Podcast: é37 lebeau

Photo : Yanick Macdonald

Pour moi, ça passe par plus de collaboration. C’est ça qui est intéressant aussi. Vraiment passer du modèle ‘Take Make Waste’ à ‘Care Dare Share’. Pour moi, ça dit tellement de choses. Je pense qu’on doit considérer tout ce qu’on a dans le domaine artistique comme un bien commun dont on doit collectivement prendre soin. Souvent, au début, on parlait en termes de faire le moins de tort possible à l’environnement, ne pas nuire, c’est souvent comme ça que l’on présente le développement durable, puis en faisant des recherches, et en m’inspirant, entre autres, de ce qui se fait à la Fondation Ellen MacArthur  en Angleterre, en économie circulaire, je me suis rendu compte qu’eux se demandent comment faire en sorte de nourrir une nouvelle réalité. Comment créer de l’art qui soit régénératif? Qui nourrisse quelque chose.

anne-catherine lebeau, balado conscient, 3 mai 2021

J’ai eu la chance de connaître Anne-Catherine Lebeau dans le cadre de mon travail sur les politiques en environnement au Conseil des arts du Canada. J’ai aussi participé avec Anne-Catherine à un panel sur l’art durable organisé par le dramaturge Daniel Danis lors du festival Mois multi à Québec le 9 février 2020. Je l’ai vu mettre sur pied avec Jasmine Catudal, Geneviève Levasseur et Isabelle Brodeur, le projet Écoscéno, en 2018, qui est, à mon avis, un très bon modèle d’une activité ‘économie circulaire’ dans les arts. Anne-Catherine explique les origines de cette entreprise et de son parcours de leadership écologique lors de notre conversation à distance qui a eu lieu le 3 mai entre Ottawa et Montréal.

Je remercie Anne-Catherine d’avoir pris le temps d’échanger avec moi et de partager sa vision, sa passion pour l’art et l’environnement et son très grand savoir-faire organisationnel.

Vous trouverez de plus amples informations sur Anne-Catherine à https://ecosceno.org/  et https://www.linkedin.com/in/anne-catherine-lebeau/

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I think we need more collaboration. That’s what’s interesting. Moving from a ‘Take Make Waste’ model to ‘Care Dare Share’. To me, that says a lot. I think we need to look at everything we have in the arts as a common good that we need to collectively take care of. Often, at the beginning, we talked in terms of doing as little harm as possible to the environment, not harming it, that’s often how sustainable development was presented, then by doing research, and by being inspired, among other things, by what is done at the Ellen MacArthur Foundation in England, around circular economies, I realized that they talk about how to nourish a new reality. How do you create art that is regenerative? Art that nourishes something.

anne-catherine lebeau, conscient podast, May 3, 2021

I had the chance to get to know Anne-Catherine Lebeau through my work on environmental policy at the Canada Council for the Arts. I also participated with Anne-Catherine in a panel on sustainable art organized by playwright Daniel Danis during the Mois multi festival in Quebec City on February 9, 2020. I saw her set up, along with Jasmine Catudal, Geneviève Levasseur and Isabelle Brodeur, the Écoscéno project, in 2018, which I think is a good example of a circular economy activity in the arts. Anne-Catherine explains the origins of this venture and her journey of ecological leadership during our remote conversation on May 3 between Ottawa and Montreal.

I would like to thank Anne-Catherine for taking the time to chat with me and share her vision, her passion for art and the environment and her great organizational skills.

You can find more information about Anne-Catherine at https://ecosceno.org/  and https://www.linkedin.com/in/anne-catherine-lebeau/

The post é37 lebeau appeared first on conscient podcast / balado conscient. conscient is a bilingual blog and podcast (French or English) by audio artist Claude Schryer that explores how arts and culture contribute to environmental awareness and action.

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About the Concient Podcast from Claude Schryer

The conscient podcast / balado conscient is a series of conversations about art, conscience and the ecological crisis. This podcast is bilingual (in either English or French). The language of the guest determines the language of the podcast. Episode notes are translated but not individual interviews.

I started the conscient project in 2020 as a personal learning journey and knowledge sharing exercise. It has been rewarding, and sometimes surprising.

The term ‘conscient’ is defined as ‘being aware of one’s surroundings, thoughts and motivations’. My touchstone for the podcast is episode 1, e01 terrified, based on an essay I wrote in May 2019, where I share my anxiety about the climate crisis and my belief that arts and culture can play a critical role in raising public awareness about environmental issues. The conscient podcast / balado conscient follows up on my http://simplesoundscapes.ca (2016–2019) project: 175, 3-minute audio and video field recordings that explore mindful listening.

Season 1 (May to October 2020) explored how the arts contribute to environmental awareness and action. I produced 3 episodes in French and 15 in English. The episodes cover a wide range of content, including activism, impact measurement, gaming, arts funding, cross-sectoral collaborations, social justice, artistic practices, etc. Episodes 8 to 17 were recorded while I was at the Creative Climate Leadership USA course in Arizona in March 2020 (led by Julie’s Bicycle). Episode 18 is a compilation of highlights from these conversations.

Season 2 (March 2021 – ) explores the concept of reality and is about accepting reality, working through ecological grief and charting a path forward. The first episode of season 2 (e19 reality) mixes quotations from 28 authors with field recordings from simplesoundscapes and from my 1998 soundscape composition, Au dernier vivant les biens. One of my findings from this episode is that ‘I now see, and more importantly, I now feel in my bones, ‘the state of things as they actually exist’, without social filters or unsustainable stories blocking the way’. e19 reality touches upon 7 topics: our perception of reality, the possibility of human extinction, ecological anxiety and ecological grief, hope, arts, storytelling and the wisdom of indigenous cultures. The rest of season 2 features interviews with thought leaders about their responses and reactions to e19 reality.

my professional services

I’ve been retired from the Canada Council for the Arts since September 15, 2020 where I served as a senior strategic advisor in arts granting (2016-2020) and manager of the Inter-Arts Office (1999-2015). My focus in (quasi) retirement is environmental issues within my area of expertise in arts and culture, in particular in acoustic ecology. I’m open to become involved in projects that align with my values and that move forward environmental concerns. Feel free to email me for a conversation : claude@conscient.ca

acknowledgement of eco-responsibility

I acknowledge that the production of the conscient podcast / balado conscient produces carbon. I try to minimize this carbon footprint by being as efficient as possible, including using GreenGeeks as my web server and acquiring carbon offsets for my equipment and travel activities from BullFrog Power and Less.

a word about privilege and bias

While recording episode 19 ‘reality’, I heard elements of ‘privilege’ in my voice that I had not noticed before. It sounded a bit like ‘ecological mansplaining’. I realize that, in spite of good intentions, I need to work my way through issues of privilege (of all kinds) and unconscious bias the way I did through ecological anxiety and grief during the fall of 2020. My re-education is ongoing.

Go to conscient.ca

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Be-coming Tree

Interview by Sally Annett

April 30, 2020 in the forest of Panovec, Nova Gorica, Slovenia, an unrobed body lies face down, on the fallen trunk of an ancient tree. Arms stretched out in front, hair falling across wood and flesh. Jatun Risba (ki/kin) is performing the first act of Be-coming Tree. Instantly reminiscent of the work by Ana Mendieta’s ‘Corazón de Roca con Sangre’ (Rock Heart with Blood) from the 1975 Silhouette series, it is a piece which also involves a ritual, shamanistic, animist style of art practice which embeds and enmeshes the human body with natural landscape in a beautiful, contemplative yet slightly distanced or abstracted way.

This was a  solitary live-streaming: a meditative, immersive hour where viewers were transported to this remote natural setting, with Risba. I interviewed Risba and the co-facilitators of the expanding Be-coming Tree events, Danielle Imara and O. Pen Be, exactly one year later, just after the fourth collective ‘Be-coming Tree’, now a quarterly annual event. This most recent Be-coming Tree took place on 24/04/2021 and simultaneously broadcast 36 ecoart performances across 6 continents and 22 countries and was a glorious celebratory ritual of humanity’s potential to co-create and connect with itself and Nature. Be-coming Tree makes this connection through a series of live, digitally transmitted, collective  performances which occur seasonally. It is a real-time, simultaneously performed, cinematic/ moving image work; each cycle of the performances matching the seasons of the year; spring, summer, autumn and winter. It unites artists globally to experience a close entanglement with trees  and be witnessed by a globally disseminated audience. It was led and created in 2020 by Risba, Imara and O. Pen Be, co-created with in excess of 71 artists in 32 countries over 6 continents at the point of writing.

Above. Be-Coming Tree 4 performance 1. Hive screen shot.

As Elizabeth McTernan writes in her recent review of ‘Future Assembly’ for the Venice Biennale Architecture, “ future imaginaries must include the more-than-human – that which both includes and exceeds humanity. The more-than-human is the many entanglements of human existence with living and nonliving entities, all of which have a stake in the planet’s future”. Risba’s work ‘Be-coming Cow,’ a dialogical moving image piece, expresses this intention loudly, along with the sense of be-ing and be-coming a single, unifying fragment of an elemental background field.

Above. Jane Corbett as part of Be-Coming Tree 4 performance 2. UK.

Risba (age 34) describes kin practice as being that of a “ transmedia artist, sower of kinship and parrhesiast exploring beyond human paradigms … Risba re-pairs Nature and Culture.” There is a freedom in kin work which expresses this ethos very boldly. Imara (age 58) and O. Pen Be (age 73) both have backgrounds in combined arts practice with a focus on body work, dance and performing arts which pulls in strands of social, therapeutic, transgressive and devotional praxis. This body-centric practice has profound philosophical roots, which have evolved through study, personal crisis and extraordinary life experience. Imara, like Risba, has what Ghislaine Boddingtoncalls a “Long-term focus on the blending of our virtual and physical bodies”.  Both are engaged in fluid temporalities and future digital and socio-psychological issues, including telematic and neuro-technical interfaces, and through which all our somatic forms and languages function, as part of an ‘entanglement’ full future. Connecting ourselves into a network, (Boddington again) a “ ‘multi-self,’ an ‘Internet of Bodies’ enabled by hyper-enhancement of the senses and tele-intuition.” Be-coming Tree expands this idea to include relation with all ‘kin’, human, animal, vegetable, mineral and spiritual, operating on a multitude of levels of ‘be-ing’ or supposed consciousness, but crucially interconnected. O. Pen Be works with the idea of the moving body as connector and witness and that these actions contain the possibilities for both sacred/ receptive and active/performative and roles and the sense of self, and that belief and identity can be scrutinized and developed for restorative purposes. All three facilitators are highly disciplined, exploratory and reflective in their approaches, using their corporeal structures as the most effective, vital and liberating medium in public and private space. Previous works like Risba’s trance dance interventions in urban spaces ‘Interesse’ (2015), Imara’s ‘Nina Silvert’s Tube’ (2011) and O. Pen Be’s startling response to COVID, ‘Touch Outlaws’ (2021) as part of  IJAD’s Open OnlineTheatre hybrid performance festival (2021) all challenge nominan behavior in broad urban and domestic environs. Be-coming Tree invites participants and audience alike to work directly with the natural world, selecting a specific object/subject; in this case ‘Tree’ as co-performer.

These three ‘kin’; Risba, Imara and O. Pen Be, together have produced what they describe as a “Grass roots community, sharing and documenting close entanglement with trees and barefoot technology through collective, global, live-streamed events,” which, describes exactly the practical and logistical aspects of Be-coming Tree. What it does not capture is the intimacy and magic of the piece, the melding of differing forms of corporeality and technology to create a hybrid chimeric being, a ‘hive’ or collective, single act. It is a digital ritual, evolving hypnotically before your eyes and ears, yet just beyond your touch. Discussing the evolution of Be-coming Tree, in the current cultural zeitgeist(s), which is in some sense being driven by the COVID-19 pandemic, the desire to be in communion with others and with the natural world is clear, and also that the public manifestation of this desire is being met, currently, through the Internet. It seems that enclaves and generations across the globe who have been steady but slow in their engagement with the digital world, perhaps only through a Skybox or Facebook, have realized that their domestic technologies can far exceed their utilitarian functions; that they are not passive screens, but connective, interactive portals to the whole of reality; physical, psychological, spiritual and divine.

Above. Kajoli llojak as part of Be-Coming Tree 4 performance 1. UK

Within the various silos of the art world this slow burn catch up is levelling out while people explore the new materials at hand and then focus back on another contemporary, arguably the most pressing, the environment. Particularly in the world of body-centred performance art and dance there has been a 180 degree rotation away from solely live, somatically present performance to generating sustainable, interactive, on-line ‘theatres’. Whilst there is still a sadness at the loss of close bodily proximity to an audience, the potential and reach of the web is vitalizing and developing existing genres of work for those of us privileged enough to have regular and high quality access to the internet. Never have human communications been so vast and encompassing.

There is an association with generational difference in the embracing of this new media, with the young’s usage of new digital knowledge (for those able globally to afford it) seemingly effortless, along with the realization that this new knowledge is process led and ever changing. For those that struggle with the TV remote control this can seem a hopeless wilderness, for which there is no time to learn the new. COVID-19 has changed this, there has been both the time and the necessity to upskill, and the Be-coming Tree facilitators, live artists and audiences are a model of intergenerational practice spanning 3 generational intervals. Our previous ease of geographical movement and physical contact  has been removed and replaced by digital freedom and mainframe intercourse. Those who had not engaged in the hundreds of thousands of on-line communities out there in the webs, have begun to do so with a great deal of excitement and energy. Artists and collectives have been working ‘on-line’ for five decades, the first (arguably) telematic work ‘The Satellite Arts Project’ was developed , delivered and documented in 1977 by artists Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz although the phrase Telematics was initially used by Simon Nora and Alain Minc in The Computerization of Society. (1)

In 2020 Annie Abrahams and Susan Fucks produced, as a digital meme, an archive, which documents the history of online performance and the hard and software which supported it from the early 1980’s. It includes  their work and that of artists like Boddington and Anne Bean, with scientifically, magically, socially and environmentally fused lived works, such as Bean’s ‘Come Hell or High Water,’ 2020, which also looks at a ‘calendar’ of collective events which comprise an annual whole and who have been pushing the boundaries of human techno and eco interactive performance since the 1908’s. The canon of female performance artists that includes Laurie Anderson, Adrian Piper and Marina Abramovic challenge stereotype and oppression through the use of archetypal form and (the) word. In the 1980’s and 90’s Starr Goode archived and recorded a series called, ‘The Goddess in Art’, which chronicled work by environmental, philosophical, theosophical and performance artists/activists such as StarHawk, Vicki Noble, Cheri Gaulke, Mayumi Oda and Barbara T.Smith (1960’s/70’s) as part of the early 1990’s revival of academic interest in their works.

Above. Hive shot of Be-Coming Tree 4 performance 2.

These artists ride on the wave of permission to take up public space negotiated by women like Marjory Cameron and Ursula Le Guin in the post WW2 years, who hark back to female figures in history who feature only largely in literature and comparative religion from the perspective of empire and enlightenment. This is not to dismiss the work of the Land Art Movements; the symbiotic pieces and dialogical works of artists like Nancy Holt,  Andy Goldsworthy or Richard Long, or politically affiliated organisations such as Greenpeace and X-tinction Rebellion, nor to continue to focus on gender and sex-based divides in contemporary practice. The work of Be-coming a Tree is part of a continuum which includes ecofeminists/ecoartists such as Marta Soriano and radical social artists like SpiderAlex, and which is ever broadening, ever ‘entangling’. However, a certain public/media unease or suspicion is evident when a female artist like Abramovic is  pilloried in social media (2020) as a witch and/or Satanist (whatever that may be) for deeply spiritual, ecological, science and technology based work; the fear of the antinomian feminine remains clear.

These ‘silos’ of body and nature-related art works have historically been entirely bound up with the usage, barriers and luxuries of public and private space. COVID-19’s limitation of access to shared space and intimacy with others has been a fascinating experiment in social engineering where – by necessity – gathering in public places has been largely forbidden, movement of peoples constrained, loved ones lost and buried in separation. The intrusion into our private spaces is also unprecedented, and our ways of being, our personal and collective protocols and thinking radically altered. We have been largely compliant but only, possibly, because we have been supported by an ethernet of connectivity.

Above. Still of Colectivo EnHebra from Be-Coming Tree 4 performance 3. Chile

In Be-coming Tree we are witnessing a quiet new collaboration which is a commixture of land-art, performance art, dance and digital art which acknowledges the posthuman and transhuman and addresses our critical environmental tragedy head on, with each small step it takes towards creating a ritual for unity; it is eco-magical, socio-scientific and deeply sincere.

Risba, locked down in rural Slovenia, unable to return to London, was aware of those millions of people in flats, tower blocks and cities around the world who were in effect imprisoned and who had had their vital, if minimal connections with Nature severed. That the physical and psychological impacts on health and spirit are enormous, especially for young children is clear, and all three artists work with a schema of healing and therapeutic benefit through performance, movement and the physical senses. The Be-coming Tree team acknowledge having worked through health and spiritual crises and hold a depth of knowledge of meditative and philosophical traditions. This regenerative practice is developed further by the project to embrace the natural world; all ticket sales from the Be-coming Tree events go to the Tree Sisters organisation, each ticket equating to a tree planted in the Amazon Tropical forests.  This internet collaboration is a  form of environmental and health activism. It again shares the zeitgeist with the growing number of companies and collectives, like ‘Effective Altruism’, ’80,000 Hours’  and ‘Othernetworks.org’, who are working in very different manners but with the shared  ambition to enhance global connectivity and community, and improve the efficacy of collaboration through the internet.

I was connected to the project by artist curator Rob La Frenais, (who also introduced Imara and Risba) as a performer in the second collective Be-coming Tree, and (with La Frenais) acted as the live blog respondent to the most recent, fourth ‘hive’ performance. The experience of viewer, performer and respondent is each completely different and immersive; as a performer you are almost introspective, engrossed in your own activity. As an audience member you can drift through and sit with pinned or multi-screens selecting what you view, knowing you will miss certain elements and allowing yourself to be led by individuals through the maze of panels, or hypnotized by the faceted screen. As respondent, engaging; trying to comprehend and describe the event and each actor within the whole was overwhelming.

The work is so rich in content, meaning and hope, additionally it would be almost impossible to watch the over 120 hours of performance footage in an analogue sitting. It is a fantastical myriad of international players, each interacting with and ‘Be-coming Tree’ bringing a particular body, a vital energy and weaving a particularly soulful imagining towards the futurtopia we must build.

Above. Gina Ben David as part of Be-Coming Tree 4 performance 2. Israel.

To see the performances and discover more about Be-coming Tree go to : https://becomingtree.live/

The entire live response to Be-coming Tree 4 part 1 can be read here :
www.atelierdemelusine.com/new-blog/2021/5/16/be-coming-tree-4-240421

Endnotes

1) Simon Nora and Alain Minc, The Computerization of Society (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1980): 4-5.

Ascott, Roy. (2003). Telematic Embrace: Visionary Theories of Art, Technology, and Consciousness. (Ed.) Edward A. Shanken. Berkeley, CA:University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-21803-1

Carl Eugene Loeffler and Roy Ascott, Chronology and Working Survey of Select Communications Activity in Leonardo (Journal of Leonardo/ISAST, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology), vol. 24, N° 2, 1991, p. 236.


Glossary
Parrhesiast : a person who speaks freely and boldly.

Sally Annett
Association ATELIER MELUSINE 4 Rue de Trupet France 86290
www.atelierdemelusine.com

Open Call for Artists

(Top image: Risba as part of Be-Coming Tree 2020. Slovenia.)

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ecoartapace was conceived in 1997 by Patricia Watts in Los Angeles. In 1999, Watts partnered with east coast curator Amy Lipton, operating as a nonprofit under the umbrella of SEE, the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs in California. 2019 marked twenty years that Watts and Lipton have curated art and ecology programs, participating on panels and giving lectures internationally. Combined, they have curated over sixty art and ecology exhibitions, many outdoors in collaboration with artists creating site-specific works. They have worked with over one thousand artists from across the United States, and some internationally. Starting 2020, ecoartspace became an LLC membership organization based out of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Claire Vaye Watkins and Her Deep Dive Into Cli-Fi

By Peterson Toscano

Claire Vaye Watkins, author of the cli-fi novel Gold Fame Citrus, is my guest in the Art House this month. Claire talks about her book and the importance of storytelling in this time of climate change. With her writing and imagination, she allows herself to go to places many climate advocates avoid. In doing so, she raises important questions about our work and this critical time in history. My hope is that listening to this wise, insightful, and witty interview will help you hone your own skills as a storyteller.

In addition to the novel Gold Fame Citrus, Claire Vaye Watkins is the author of the short story collection Battleborn. She is winner of the Story Prize, the Dylan Thomas Prize, the New York Public Library’s Young Lions Fiction Award, and the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, among other prizes. A National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree, Watkins is a professor at the University of California Irvine and lives in Twentynine Palms, California.

Next month: Cherokee lawyer and playwright Mary Kathlyn Nagle.

If you like what you hear, you can listen to full episodes of Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher Radio, Spotify, SoundCloudPodbeanNorthern Spirit RadioGoogle PlayPlayerFM, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

This article is part of The Art House series.

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As host of Citizens’ Climate Radio, Peterson Toscano regularly features artists who address climate change in their work. The Art House section of his program includes singer/songwriters, visual artists, comics, creative writers, and playwrights. Through a collaboration with Artists and Climate Change and Citizens’ Climate Education, each month Peterson reissues The Art House for this blog. If you have an idea for The Art House, contact Peterson: radio @ citizensclimatelobby.org

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Seven Climate Beacons announced!

More than 30 environmental, cultural and heritage organisations are coming together in regions across Scotland to inspire public engagement and positive action in the run-up to and beyond the COP26 UN Climate Change Conference, taking place in Glasgow this November.

Seven hubs known as ‘Climate Beacons’ were announced today and will take shape in ArgyllCaithness & East SutherlandFifeInverclydeMidlothianthe Outer Hebrides, and Tayside. Each Beacon is a partnership of two or more organisations from the cultural and climate sectors. The organisations, many of which have not previously worked together, range from museums, libraries and arts centres to environmental bodies, academic institutions and community trusts. They will bring together shared resources and knowledge to provide a welcoming physical and virtual space in their region for the public, artists and cultural sector professionals, environmental NGOs, scientists and policymakers.

Leading the initiative is Creative Carbon Scotland and Director, Ben Twist, said: “Tackling climate change requires us to find imaginative solutions to complex problems. Cultural buildings and events can provide an open and welcoming space for these challenging conversations, bringing people together to collectively think, imagine, feel and develop lasting connections that will strengthen future climate action.”

The seven Climate Beacons will operate in the lead-up to, during, and after COP26, each utilising their own expertise and responding to the needs of their local area and communities with planned themes including Scotland’s temperate rainforests, industrial heritage, water, adaptation to climate change, land use, biodiversity, green jobs, and the recovery from COVID-19.

Climate Beacons for COP26 aims to strengthen engagement with COP26 beyond Glasgow to the whole country and support the recovery of Scotland’s cultural sector from the impacts of COVID-19. The initiative will seize the chance to bring about lasting change within the cultural sector, society and policy in Scotland and provide an internationally inspiring example of Scotland’s climate leadership.

Supporting Creative Carbon Scotland and the initiative as co-ordinating partners are six leading sector organisations and development bodies: Architecture and Design ScotlandCreative Scotland, the Edinburgh Climate Change InstituteMuseums Galleries Scotland, the Scottish Library and Information Council, and the Sustainable Scotland Network.

Climate Beacons for COP26 is funded by the Scottish Government’s Climate Change and Culture Divisions, Creative Scotland and Museums Galleries Scotland.

For more information about each of the Beacons, visit our dedicated Climate Beacons for COP26 web page.

Read the Climate Beacons for COP26 launch press release.

Logos of the seven co-ordinating partners for Climate Beacons

The post Seven Climate Beacons announced! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Have your say on World Oceans Day!

What’s your vision for the future of our seas in the Outer Hebrides?

The United Nations World Oceans Day (8th June) is a day for humanity to celebrate the ocean. To mark the day, MarPAMM – Seas of the Outer Hebrides project is launching their latest film ‘Seas Our Future’. Watch this fantastic wee film with local presenter Kate Macleod and share your views on how we can protect our marine environment in the Outer Hebrides for generations to come!

Creative Carbon Scotland has been collaborating with the MarPAMM – Seas of the Outer Hebrides project since 2019, using creative approaches to explore communities’ visions for the future of marine environment in the Outer Hebrides, and is thrilled to have worked with UistFilm to produce this short film.

The film shares the key concerns identified by communities in the Outer Hebrides about their marine environment including:

  • Their need to balance looking after their seas with sustaining marine jobs
  • Addressing undesired changes in the marine environment including climate change, marine litter and pollution and the loss of animal and plant species (biodiversity loss)
  • Sharing knowledge, resources and information of the benefits that Marine Protected Areas bring to communities and nature

We’ve also partnered with local artists and arts centres Taigh Chearsabhagh and An Lanntair to deliver a series of creative digital and outdoor activities for all ages, abilities and background. Keep an eye on partner websites for information about future activities or contact gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com

From 7-16th June MarPAMM & NatureScot will be surveying seabed habitats in waters off the west coast of Harris. The team will use a drop-down video camera to improve understanding of the distribution of seagrass, maerl and kelp beds, and mud habitats in the area. The results of the work will be relayed via the MarPAMM – Seas of the Outer Hebrides webpage and be used to inform future discussions about marine nature conservation in the Outer Hebrides.

Share your vision for the future of Marine Protected Areas in the Outer Hebrides.

The post Have your say on World Oceans Day! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Youth Homelessness Charity launches first Green Action Plan ahead of World Environment Day 2021

Scottish Youth Homelessness Charity, Rock Trust, publishes their first Green Action Plan 2021-22 to demonstrate their commitment to sustainability and improving the health, wellbeing and prospects for young people affected by homelessness.

Rock Trust’s first Green Action Plan outlines the steps the charity is currently taking to reduce their carbon footprint, as well as highlighting the many steps they aim to take over the next year to help minimise environmental impact. The plan is proudly aligned to the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with the first year’s SMART objectives initially focusing on goal three and seven of the UN’s 2030 Agenda: Good Health and Wellbeing, and Affordable and Clean Energy.

Fuel costs continue to remain a critical issue in Scotland, with 25% of all households living in fuel poverty – defined by the Scottish Government as any household spending more than 10% of their income on energy – after housing costs have been taken out. Like the Scottish Government, Rock Trust recognises the four main drivers of fuel poverty: energy prices, income, energy efficiency of the home, and how energy is used in the home. The charity has already begun addressing these drivers in their Green Action Plan by creating resource booklets for the young people in their services and accommodation. These resources provide guidance on areas such as sustainability in the home, energy efficiency and condensation. You can view these booklets on Rock Trust’s Sustainability webpage here: www.rocktrust.org/sustainability

Rock Trust staff are also benefiting from the organisation’s commitment to the Green Action plan. Five employees have signed up to the charity’s Bike2Work scheme as part of their initiative to promote active travel. This number is expected to grow as COVID-19 restrictions ease and more employees come back to the workplace.

Rock Trust’s partners Home Energy Scotland and OVO Foundation have been influential to their Green Action Plan, both contributing to the plan and offering ongoing advice and support surrounding sustainability best practice.

Read Rock Trust’s Green Action Plan 2021-22.

The post Youth Homelessness Charity launches first Green Action Plan ahead of World Environment Day 2021 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Conscient Podcast: e36 fanconi

Ben Twist at Creative Carbon Scotland talks about the transformation from a culture of consumerism to a culture of stewardship and we are the culture makers so isn’t that our job right now to make a new culture and it will take all of us as artists together to do that? …  It’s not enough to do carbon neutral work. We want to do carbon positive work. We want our artwork to be involved with ecological restoration. What does that mean? I’ve been thinking a lot about that. What is theatre practice that actually gives back, that makes something more sustainable? That is carbon positive. I guess that’s a conversation that I’m hoping to have in the future with other theater makers who have that vision.

kendra fanconi, conscient podcast, April 19, 2021, British Columbia

I’ve known Kendra for many years, first through her work with Radix Theatre then as an arts and environment advocate in the community, notably through The Only Animal company, which she co-founded with Eric Rhys Miller in 2005 and which has created over 30 shows  that ‘take theatre places it has never gone before’. I’ve always admired Kendra’s vision, her calm demeanour, her strategic mind, and deep commitment to environment issues, as you’ll hear on our conversation, which recorded remotely between Ottawa and her home on the Sunshine Coast.

As I did with all episodes this season, I have integrated excerpts from previous episodes in this case, from e19 reality in this episode.

I would like to thank Kendra for taking the time to speak with me, for sharing her deep knowledge of arts and environment practices, her generosity of spirit and her passion for the mobilization of artists in climate emergency.

For more information on Kendra’s work, see https://www.theonlyanimal.com/

Kendra in the field…

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Ben Twist, de Creative Carbon Scotland, parle de la transformation d’une culture de consommation en une culture d’intendance. Nous sommes les créateurs de la culture, alors n’est-ce pas notre travail de créer une nouvelle culture, et il nous faudra tous, en tant qu’artistes, pour y parvenir ? … Il ne suffit pas de faire un travail neutre en carbone. Nous voulons faire un travail positif en termes de carbone. Nous voulons que nos œuvres d’art participent à la restauration écologique. Qu’est-ce que cela signifie ? J’ai beaucoup réfléchi à cette question. Quelle est la pratique théâtrale qui redonne réellement, qui rend quelque chose plus durable ? Qui soit positive en termes de carbone. Je suppose que c’est une conversation que j’espère avoir à l’avenir avec d’autres créateurs de théâtre qui ont cette vision.

kendra fanconi, balado conscient, 19 avril 2021, Colombie-Britannique

Je connais Kendra depuis de nombreuses années, d’abord par son travail avec Radix Theatre, puis en tant que défenseur des arts et de l’environnement dans la communauté, notamment par le biais de la compagnie The Only Animal, qu’elle a cofondée avec Eric Rhys Miller en 2005 et qui a créé plus de 30 spectacles qui “emmènent le théâtre là où il n’est jamais allé auparavant”. J’ai toujours admiré la vision de Kendra, son comportement calme, son esprit stratégique et son profond engagement envers les questions environnementales, comme vous pourrez l’entendre au cours de notre conversation, enregistrée à distance entre Ottawa et sa maison sur la Sunshine Coast.

Comme je l’ai fait pour tous les épisodes de cette saison, j’ai intégré à cet épisode des extraits d’épisodes précédents – dans ce cas, de  e19 reality.

Je tiens à remercier Kendra d’avoir pris le temps de s’entretenir avec moi, de partager sa profonde connaissance des pratiques artistiques et environnementales, sa générosité d’esprit et sa passion pour la mobilisation des artistes dans l’urgence climatique.

Pour plus d’informations sur le travail de Kendra, voir https://www.theonlyanimal.com/ .

The post e36 fanconi appeared first on conscient podcast / balado conscient. conscient is a bilingual blog and podcast (French or English) by audio artist Claude Schryer that explores how arts and culture contribute to environmental awareness and action.

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About the Concient Podcast from Claude Schryer

The conscient podcast / balado conscient is a series of conversations about art, conscience and the ecological crisis. This podcast is bilingual (in either English or French). The language of the guest determines the language of the podcast. Episode notes are translated but not individual interviews.

I started the conscient project in 2020 as a personal learning journey and knowledge sharing exercise. It has been rewarding, and sometimes surprising.

The term ‘conscient’ is defined as ‘being aware of one’s surroundings, thoughts and motivations’. My touchstone for the podcast is episode 1, e01 terrified, based on an essay I wrote in May 2019, where I share my anxiety about the climate crisis and my belief that arts and culture can play a critical role in raising public awareness about environmental issues. The conscient podcast / balado conscient follows up on my http://simplesoundscapes.ca (2016–2019) project: 175, 3-minute audio and video field recordings that explore mindful listening.

Season 1 (May to October 2020) explored how the arts contribute to environmental awareness and action. I produced 3 episodes in French and 15 in English. The episodes cover a wide range of content, including activism, impact measurement, gaming, arts funding, cross-sectoral collaborations, social justice, artistic practices, etc. Episodes 8 to 17 were recorded while I was at the Creative Climate Leadership USA course in Arizona in March 2020 (led by Julie’s Bicycle). Episode 18 is a compilation of highlights from these conversations.

Season 2 (March 2021 – ) explores the concept of reality and is about accepting reality, working through ecological grief and charting a path forward. The first episode of season 2 (e19 reality) mixes quotations from 28 authors with field recordings from simplesoundscapes and from my 1998 soundscape composition, Au dernier vivant les biens. One of my findings from this episode is that ‘I now see, and more importantly, I now feel in my bones, ‘the state of things as they actually exist’, without social filters or unsustainable stories blocking the way’. e19 reality touches upon 7 topics: our perception of reality, the possibility of human extinction, ecological anxiety and ecological grief, hope, arts, storytelling and the wisdom of indigenous cultures. The rest of season 2 features interviews with thought leaders about their responses and reactions to e19 reality.

my professional services

I’ve been retired from the Canada Council for the Arts since September 15, 2020 where I served as a senior strategic advisor in arts granting (2016-2020) and manager of the Inter-Arts Office (1999-2015). My focus in (quasi) retirement is environmental issues within my area of expertise in arts and culture, in particular in acoustic ecology. I’m open to become involved in projects that align with my values and that move forward environmental concerns. Feel free to email me for a conversation : claude@conscient.ca

acknowledgement of eco-responsibility

I acknowledge that the production of the conscient podcast / balado conscient produces carbon. I try to minimize this carbon footprint by being as efficient as possible, including using GreenGeeks as my web server and acquiring carbon offsets for my equipment and travel activities from BullFrog Power and Less.

a word about privilege and bias

While recording episode 19 ‘reality’, I heard elements of ‘privilege’ in my voice that I had not noticed before. It sounded a bit like ‘ecological mansplaining’. I realize that, in spite of good intentions, I need to work my way through issues of privilege (of all kinds) and unconscious bias the way I did through ecological anxiety and grief during the fall of 2020. My re-education is ongoing.

Go to conscient.ca

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Artichoke Dance Company: Just Gowanus

PERFORMANCE DATES:

SATURDAY, JULY 10TH – 2:00-4:00PM

SUNDAY, JULY 11TH – 2:00-4:00PM

SATURDAY, JULY 17TH – 2:00-4:00PM

SUNDAY, JULY 18TH – 2:00-4:00PM

ALL PERFORMANCES BEGIN AT THE SALT LOT IN GOWANUS (2 SECOND AVENUE).

BUY TICKETS HERE.

Artichoke Dance Company presents Just Gowanus: An Interactive Performance Tour that intersects performance and environmental education to bring awareness to the neighborhood of Gowanus, Brooklyn.

Both the Gowanus Canal and neighborhood have historically faced environmental challenges due to decades of industrial pollution. The Gowanus Canal was named New York City’s first superfund site because of the extreme toxicity in the canal. Remediation is finally underway, and the largest scale rezoning in New York City in 20 years is being proposed for the area. Just Gowanus is an experiential walking tour of the neighborhood that brings audiences to location that are significant to the remediation of the canal, rezoning, and other sustainability initiatives in the area. Interactive experiences engage tour goers in activism and visioning, and performances reflect on the areas complex history and contentious future.

This project will be Artichoke Dance Company’s third event in Gowanus and aims to illuminate the area’s history from an environmental justice perspective.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.