Monthly Archives: August 2021

Opportunity: VAS Annual Exhibition 2022 open call

Inviting artists to submit to the VAS annual exhibition at the Royal Scottish Academy.

Visual Arts Scotland would like to invite artists from across Scotland, the UK and Internationally to apply to be part of one of the oldest and biggest exhibiting events celebrating contemporary art in Scotland.

Visual Arts Scotland presents our Annual Exhibition 2022, celebrating the best in innovative contemporary visual arts. The exhibition will take place at the Royal Scottish Academy, National Galleries of Scotland, The Mound, Edinburgh in January 2022. This annual show promises to be one of the most diverse exhibitions of contemporary art to be held in Scotland in 2022 with an expected audience of over 30,000 people.

We welcome entries from artists working across a diversity of artforms. Please note that there are five specific open calls pertaining to work type. Please click on the links below to apply:

  1. General submissions (ceramics, painting, sculpture, tapestry, drawing, print, glass, design, bookmaking and all other mediums not listed in other specific open call categories)
  2. Jewellery
  3. Large works & installation
  4. Moving image
  5. Performance

We will have a separate call out for those who wish to apply for the Inches Carr Mentoring Award for makers and craftspeople in October.

Please read the guidance document for details of eligibility and fees.

DEADLINE: Saturday 9th October 2021

The post Opportunity: VAS Annual Exhibition 2022 open call appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Bonnie Ora Sherk (1945-2021)

It is with great sadness we share that pioneering ecological artist Bonnie Ora Sherk passed away on Sunday, August 8, 2021, in San Francisco, California (USA). Sherk will be laid to rest on Wednesday, August 11 at Noon at the Mendocino Jewish Cemetery, near where her parents are buried.

Bonnie Ora Sherk was an American landscape architect, planner, educator and international artist, and founder of Crossroads Community, known as The Farm, and A Living Library. She’s well-known for her environmental performance work in the early 1970s, including Public Lunch, where Sherk ate her lunch in a cage next to tiger and lion cages in the Lion House of the San Francisco Zoo. The performance took place on a Saturday at 2pm, during normal feeding time and prime spectator attendance, highlighting a human being fed and watched like the other animals.

Public Lunch (1971). San Francisco Zoo Lion House. © 1971 Bonnie Ora Sherk.

In 2012, Patricia Watts conducted a two-hour interview with Bonnie Ora Sherk for the ecoartspace archive. Excerpts from the interview are located on our website under Exhibits, Performative Ecologies, an exhibition curated by Watts in 2020, including Public Lunch at 826 Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Watts additionally interviewed Sherk with SITE Santa Fe last summer for their My Life in Art series here.

Former ecoartspace curator Amy Lipton too worked with Sherk, including documentation of her Roosevelt Island Living Library & Think Park in FOODshed: Art and Agriculture in Action at Smack Mellon in Brooklyn, New York, in 2014. 

The artist coined the term Funcshuional Art in 2003 to describe a new genre of art that combines the functionalism of the west with the sensitivity toward ecological alignment, natural systems and spirituality of the East. Her goal was that this concept would embrace the diversity of cultures from all directions. 

Bonnie Ora Sherk’s early groundbreaking performative work and fifty-year career focused on ecological issues with The Farm and A Living Library have been incredibly inspirational.

She will be missed and remembered. 

Her Instagram account is a_livinglibrary.

Sitting Still I (1970). Army Street/101 Freeway Interchange Construction Zone, San Francisco. © Bonnie Ora Sherk.

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ecoartapace was conceived in 1997 by Patricia Watts in Los Angeles. In 1999, Watts partnered with east coast curator Amy Lipton, operating as a nonprofit under the umbrella of SEE, the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs in California. 2019 marked twenty years that Watts and Lipton have curated art and ecology programs, participating on panels and giving lectures internationally. Combined, they have curated over sixty art and ecology exhibitions, many outdoors in collaboration with artists creating site-specific works. They have worked with over one thousand artists from across the United States, and some internationally. Starting 2020, ecoartspace became an LLC membership organization based out of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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The Complex Interrelationships of Tending the Land

Olivia Ann Carye Hallstein

Sarah Augusta Lewison is an activist and creator who documents, researches, and builds platforms for the often-underrepresented farming communities worldwide. Her work speaks to both the social and environmental consequences of monocultural industrialized agriculture, emphasizing heightened indigenous and affected community representation. Her work has brought her throughout the United States to Yunnan, China, Mexico, and Argentina and her Center for Subsistence Research acts as a connecting space for artists, crafters, farmers, and researchers alike. In our interview, Sarah speaks about her work and experiences and her conclusions surrounding the state of agriculture today.

I am consumed with documenting and working within a real world, so I look for ways to draw attention to possibility, love, and connection.

(Melt with Us: An Essay About the Seed Bomb, Sarah Lewison, pub. Journal of Aesthetics and Protest, 2015)

Hi Sarah, thank you so much for speaking with EcoArtSpace today! Let’s jump right in: you describe your work as a semi non-fiction medium that integrates storytelling and narrative into real-world documentation. How did you decide to use semi non-fiction mediums?

I started out doing documentary videos but felt dissatisfied with the endings; I wanted something more hopeful and interesting than simple narrative closure. But I am consumed with documenting and working within the real world, so I look for ways to draw attention to possibility, love, and connection. For example, in the Monsanto Hearings, we overturn conventions of legal procedure to allow non-human animals to testify and collectivize claims of harm in a way that would never ordinarily take place.

Layering the speculative onto the document is also informed by the research and practice of my collaborator and son, Duskin Drum. Duskin drew my attention to crudely photoshopped scenes under climate change, such as Studio Lindfor’s Aqualta (2009) of rice growing on 42nd St in NYC, and his domed subsistence village in Yunnan, China, which protected people from the state and development more than weather. Imagination is so important – for all of us. We can productively consider Jameson’s famous conjecture that it is easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. 

(Chicken Tenders, Sarah Lewison, Feb-March 2021)

There seems to be a strong connection between the environment and people living within these environments in your work. It reminds me of your most recent project, “The Brownfield Between Us,” where you are documenting a clean energy initiative on a piece of land with an industrial and racially discriminatory past. Many people criticize green initiatives of social-historical denialism because they do not offer social support. What have you noticed on the ground where you are?

Your question describes precisely the situation in Carbondale. Our documentary attempts to lay out the multiple different frameworks of knowledge and experience that inform peoples’ reactions to the city’s flirtation with a solar development on a contaminated site adjacent to a black neighborhood. The debate reveals how perceptions of safety or risk are tied to privilege in a situation where there is uncertainty.  Some neighborhood residents fiercely and repeatedly raise this uncertainty to the point that the city government and some lighter-skinned residents living at a distance treat it as irrational. The activists’ questions are not seen as valid by all, but isn’t it worthwhile to consider whether citizens should trust the EPA after what has happened in Flint? Should we have faith in the EPA’s system for evaluating contamination based on “acceptable levels” of chemical traces and on the presumption that toxins decay into innocent elements within the matrix of the soil?

Not everyone, but some people say, exhilaratingly, “Just leave the land alone!”

A tragedy continues to haunt the neighborhood: many people succumbed to death from the same kind of cancer. There is also a living memory of dust and foul odors from the creosote plant. For years the residents demanded more comprehensive soil testing and were refused by the city, the EPA, and the landowners. In this project, I wonder if there can ever be enough testing to satisfy a hunger for information that may never be retrieved. The metaphoric – or real ghosts – who perished from their labor or familial associations with the tie rod plant are hungry.

Another argument against the greenfield lurks as an anti-capitalist, decolonial subtext for some, the opportunistic profiteering of the “greenfield” solar company to the erstwhile extraction of value from humans in the form of enslaved labor, denigration, and diminishment under Jim Crow. The overall expectation of the landowners is that they will be able to continue extracting value from the land itself. Not everyone, but some people say, exhilaratingly, “Just leave the land alone!” 

(Still from Naxilandia, Sarah Lewison, 2008)

They bring out the complexity of subsistence life and the vast kinds of knowledge held by the farmers that allows them to make so many small decisions; about the weather, when to plant and harvest, what to cultivate for market etc.

It seems these topics are globally present: not just in the USA, your work in China speaks to social disparity as well. I have noticed that the flow of your films, such as “Naxilandia,” offers impressions of the “agricultural modernization to the nation’s indigenous highland homes” in Yunnan Province of China, allowing viewers to draw their own conclusions. What strategies do you use to create this work?

Although I was inspired by how artists such as Burtynsky have used scale, especially in China, to telegraphically reveal the destructive impact of human activities on the landscape, I only had a small camera and a variable lens, and myself. I aimed instead for intimacy and the temporality of the everyday.  Sometimes I videotaped for the entire period it took to seed or harvest a field, wash wheat, or wait out a rainstorm before returning to the field. I ended up with a lot of footage to sift through and used many of these long sequences in the installation, consisting of 3 or 4 videos playing synchronously. They bring out the complexity of subsistence life and the vast kinds of knowledge held by the farmers that allows them to make so many small decisions; about the weather, when to plant and harvest, what to cultivate for market etc. There is also an element of meditation to the tasks.

I contrasted this hand / physical work to paid labor and the appearance in the landscape of more and bigger machines for moving earth and controlling water, and managing people. These become more predominant over the duration of the film, finally appearing on all screens. There is also a video channel with text that narrates the historical and technical context.

They are forming cultural collectives that are re-energizing the use of indigenous language and cultural practices. They also are learning, through practice and research, a combination of agroecological, permacultural and traditional approaches to cultivating, foraging, and preserving.

(Still from Naxilandia, Sarah Lewison, 2008)

You mention the “complexity of subsistence life” revealed to you while creating “Naxilandia.” Can you speak more to the farmer’s experiences with which you were working? How much restorative agriculture is already practiced in the Yunnan Province, and is there information to uphold the environmental balance through agriculture in the face of “reforming and opening up”?

The farming communes under the Maoist period were encouraged to use “modern” farming techniques, so there is not necessarily a consistent change in farming approaches due to the reforms. Some subsistence farmers we met in Yunnan use organic cultivation for home consumption, reserving the use of manufactured fertilizer, herbicides, and pesticides for their market crops. The coolest holdover we observed from the commune period is that people still communize their labor, especially the women, who will help each other with large jobs such as getting an entire field picked and loaded on a truck.    

In 2008, I visited a marvelous organic farm and eco-resort in Yunnan, experimenting with agroecological techniques. I had heard about a few others near Beijing, but they were struggling with a lack of market demand for organic food. To make a more significant environmental impact, they will need to out-pace the state policy drives to industrialize and off-shore farming. It’s depressing.  

In 2019, we met indigenous youth returning with their children to NW Yunnan villages. They are forming cultural collectives that are re-energizing the use of indigenous language and cultural practices. Through practice and research, they also learn a combination of agroecological, permacultural, and traditional approaches to cultivating, foraging and preserving. In the limited engagement I’ve had with farmers in China at this level, I’ve learned that they take their job of growing food for their families and communities very seriously. The imperative is to get bigger or consolidate as being pressed by the state is difficult to resist.

In rural areas in the United States, municipalities and counties now spray the roadsides with Roundup. Organic growers need to put up “no-spray” signs. Wherever the spray is applied, usually from an airplane, people are exposed to drift. It is a considerable problem in Argentina and Paraguay, a geographic area that artist Eduard Molinari calls “the Republic of Soy,” where children in nearby towns are directly hit and sickened from the exposure. It’s a terrible crisis on top of all the other crises; I’m not aware it has changed, although there have been a couple of successful lawsuits against the technology. And in the United States, these technologies and the big commodity farmers continue to win the greatest share of federal money, leaving the small farmers who grow real food to struggle along. 

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ecoartapace was conceived in 1997 by Patricia Watts in Los Angeles. In 1999, Watts partnered with east coast curator Amy Lipton, operating as a nonprofit under the umbrella of SEE, the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs in California. 2019 marked twenty years that Watts and Lipton have curated art and ecology programs, participating on panels and giving lectures internationally. Combined, they have curated over sixty art and ecology exhibitions, many outdoors in collaboration with artists creating site-specific works. They have worked with over one thousand artists from across the United States, and some internationally. Starting 2020, ecoartspace became an LLC membership organization based out of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Why Climate Emotions Matter

By Jennifer Atkinson

Is reason or emotion more important in driving climate action? Will solutions to mass extinction come from the head or the heart? Or are these binaries themselves part of the problem? While some climate activists argue that we should focus on facts instead of feelings, others know that our intense emotional response to climate chaos is far from irrational. Moreover, feelings like anger, hope, anxiety, and fear profoundly shape our perceptions of the world, and can motivate us to act or shut down and retreat. To better understand how those mental and emotional states relate to environmental crisis and public perceptions of risk, this episode explores why emotions matter in the climate battle.

This segment also looks at the work of Rachel Carson to explore how narrative can rouse the public to action, and draws on insights from evolutionary psychology to examine the ancient relation between mind and environment as expressed in feelings of love and wonder toward the natural world.

(Top image by Bjørn Tore Økland via Unsplash.)

Facing It is a podcast about climate grief and eco anxiety. It explores the psychological toll of climate change, and why our emotional responses are key to addressing this existential threat. In each episode of Facing It, I explore a different way we can harness despair to activate meaningful solutions.

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Dr. Jennifer Atkinson is an Associate Professor of environmental humanities at the University of Washington, Bothell. Her seminars on Eco-Grief & Climate Anxiety have been featured in the New York TimesWashington Post Magazine, the Los Angeles TimesNBC News, the Seattle Times, Grist, the Washington PostKUOW and many other outlets. Jennifer is currently working on a book titled An Existential Toolkit for the Climate Crisis (co-edited with Sarah Jaquette Ray) that offers strategies to help young people navigate the emotional toll of climate breakdown.

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Conscient Podcast: é55 trépanier – un petit instant dans un espace beaucoup plus vaste

Je pense que ce cycle du colonialisme, et de ce que ça a apporté, on est en train d’arriver à la fin de ce cycle là aussi, et avec le recul, on va s’apercevoir que cela a été un tout petit instant dans un espace beaucoup plus vaste, et qu’on est en train de retourner à des connaissances très profondes. Qu’est-ce que ça veut dire de vivre ici sur cette planète? Ce que ça implique comme possibilité, mais comme responsabilité aussi de maintenir les relations harmonieuses? Moi, je dis que suis la solution à la crise climatique c’est cardiaque. Ça va passer par le cœur. On parle d’amour avec la planète. C’est ça, le travail.

france trépanier, balado conscient, 7 juin, 2021, colombie britannique

France Trépanier est artiste en arts visuels, commissaire et chercheure d’ascendance Kanien’kéha:ka et française. Elle signe aussi de nombreux essais et articles qui ont été publiés dans des journaux et des magazines. Elle a travaillé au Conseil des arts du Canada, au ministère du Patrimoine canadien, à l’ambassade du Canada à Paris et au Centre Culturel canadien à Paris. Elle est aussi co-directrice, avec Chris Creighton-Kelly de https://www.primary-colours.ca.

Je connais France depuis de nombreuses années dans la communauté artistique et par le biais du Conseil des arts du Canada. Notre conversation m’a profondément touchée. Je me souviens que pendant l’enregistrement, j’ai senti mes épaules se détendre et ma respiration se ralentir alors qu’elle parlait du temps et de la vision du monde autochtone.  

Voici quelques extraits de notre conversation que j’aimerais souligner :

Terra nullius

Pour moi, le défi de l’enjeu écologique ou de la crise écologique dans laquelle on se trouve, c’est de bien comprendre la source du problème et de pas juste de mettre un pansement, de pas juste essayer de faire des petits ajustements sur nos manières de vivre, mais de vraiment porter un regard sur la nature même du problème et pour moi, je pense qu’il s’est passé quelque chose au moment du contact, au moment où les Européens sont arrivés. Ils sont arrivés avec cette notion-là de propriété. On parle de terra nullius, l’idée qu’ils pouvaient s’approprier les territoires qui étaient ‘inhabités’ (je mets des guillemets sur inhabités) et je pense que ça a été notre première collision de vision du monde.

Vision éurocentrique des pratiques artistiques

En fait, si on prend encore une vue allongée de la façon dont la vision éurocentrique des pratiques artistiques s’est imposée sur les pratiques matérielles des cultures du monde. Ça va être un tout petit instant dans l’histoire. Cette idée des disciplines, la manière dont la vision eurocentrique a imposé des catégories, a imposé un certain élitisme des pratiques. La manière dont il a déclassifié aussi la culture matérielle des Premières Nations ou ce n’était pas possible, ce n’était pas de l’art. Les objets d’art devenaient soit des artefacts ou de l’artisanat. On a complètement déclassifié, on n’a pas compris. Je pense que les premiers arrivants ici n’ont pas compris ce qui était en face d’eux.

La vraie tragédie

L’artiste Mike MacDonald racontait une histoire, Mike, qui est un artiste Mi’kmaq, qui plus est avec nous maintenant, a fait du travail remarquable, un artiste des nouveaux médias, il y racontait une fois un des ainés dans sa communauté. Il disait que la vraie tragédie du Canada n’est pas qu’on a empêché les gens de parler leur langue. La vraie tragédie, c’est que les nouveaux venus n’ont pas adopté les cultures d’ici. Donc il y a eu des grandes mésententes. 

Réécrire le monde?

Je pense qu’on n’a pas besoin de rien réécrire du tout. Je pense qu’on a juste besoin de porter attention et d’écouter. On a juste besoin de la fermer un peu pour un petit bout. Parce est dans la notion de ‘authoring’, il y a le mot ‘author’ et cela présuppose le mot autorité (authority) et je ne suis pas certaine que c’est de ça dont on a besoin maintenant. Je pense que c’est l’inverse. Je pense qu’il faut changer notre rapport à l’autorité. Il faut déconstruire cette idée là quand on est en train d’être les décideurs ou les maîtres de quoi que ce soit. Je ne pense pas que c’est la bonne approche. Je pense qu’il faut écouter. Je ne dis pas qu’il ne faut pas imaginer – je pense que l’imagination c’est important dans cette écoute attentive – mais de penser qu’on va réécrire, c’est peut-être un peu prétentieux.

Je tiens à remercier France d’avoir pris le temps de me parler, d’avoir partagé sa profonde connaissance des arts et de la culture autochtone, pour son engagement envers la diversité et l’équité, sa générosité et sa capacité à mettre ses immenses talents et sa sagesse au service de ceux qui en ont le plus besoin.

‘Portage’, pastel sur papier, 40’ x 60’ (2020) - France Trépanier
‘Portage’, pastel sur papier, 40’ x 60’ (2020) – France Trépanier

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(translation)

I think that with this cycle of colonialism, and what it has brought, that we are coming to the end of this century, and with hindsight, we will realize that it was a very small moment in a much larger space, and that we are returning to very deep knowledge. What does it mean to live here on this planet? What does it mean to have the possibility, but also the responsibility to maintain harmonious relationships? I say that the solution to the climate crisis is ‘cardiac’. It will go through the heart. We are talking about love of the planet. That’s the work.

france trépanier, conscient podcast, june 7, 2021, british columbia

France Trépanier is a visual artist, curator and researcher of Kanien’kéha:ka and French ancestry. Her essays and articles have been published in numerous journals and magazines. She worked at the Canada Council for the Arts, the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Canadian Embassy in Paris and Canadian Cultural Centre in Paris. She is also co-Director, with Chris Creighton-Kelly, of https://www.primary-colours.ca

I’ve known France for many years in the arts community and through the Canada Council. Our conscient conversation affected me deeply. I recall during the recording that I felt my shoulders relax and my breath slow down as she spoke about time and indigenous world view.  

Here are some excerpts from our conversation that I would like to highlight:

Terra nullius

For me, the challenge of the ecological issue or the ecological crisis in which we find ourselves is to understand the source of the problem and not just to put a band-aid on it, not just to try to make small adjustments to our ways of living, but to really look at the very nature of the problem. For me, I think that something happened at the moment of contact, at the moment when the Europeans arrived. They arrived with this notion of property. They talked about Terra Nullius, the idea that they could appropriate territories that were ‘uninhabited’ (I put quotation marks on uninhabited) and I think that was our first collision of worldviews.

Eurocentric vision of artistic practices

If we take a longer term view of how the eurocentric view of artistic practices have imposed itself on the material practices of world cultures, this is going to be a very small moment in history. The idea of disciplines, the way in which the Eurocentric vision imposed categories and imposed a certain elitism of practices. The way it also declassified the material culture of the First Nations or it was not possible, it was not art. Art objects became either artifacts or crafts. It was completely declassified, we didn’t understand. I think the first people who came here didn’t understand what was in front of them.

The Real Tragedy

The artist Mike MacDonald was telling a story, Mike, who is a Mi’kmaq artist, who is with us now, but who has done remarkable work, a new media artist, he was telling a story once about one of the elders in his community, he was saying that the real tragedy of Canada, it’s not that people have been prevented from speaking their language. The real tragedy is that the newcomers have not adopted the cultures here. So ‘there have been great misunderstandings. 

Reauthoring the world?

I don’t think we need to rewrite anything at all. I think we just need to pay attention and listen. We just need to shut up a little bit for a while. Because it’s in the notion of authoring and that the word ‘author’ presupposes the word authority and I’m not sure that’s what we need right now. I think it’s the opposite. I think we need to change our relationship to authority. We need to deconstruct that idea when we’re being the decision makers or the masters of anything. I don’t think that’s the right approach. I think you have to listen. I’m not saying that we shouldn’t imagine – I think that imagination is important in this attentive listening – but to think that we are going to rewrite is perhaps a little pretentious.

I would like to thank France for taking the time to speak with me, for sharing her deep knowledge of indigenous arts and culture, her commitment to diversity and equity, her generosity and her ability to shift her immense talents and wisdom to wherever is there is the most need. 

The post é55 trépanier – un petit instant dans un espace beaucoup plus vaste appeared first on conscient podcast / balado conscient. conscient is a bilingual blog and podcast (French or English) by audio artist Claude Schryer that explores how arts and culture contribute to environmental awareness and action.

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About the Concient Podcast from Claude Schryer

The conscient podcast / balado conscient is a series of conversations about art, conscience and the ecological crisis. This podcast is bilingual (in either English or French). The language of the guest determines the language of the podcast. Episode notes are translated but not individual interviews.

I started the conscient project in 2020 as a personal learning journey and knowledge sharing exercise. It has been rewarding, and sometimes surprising.

The term ‘conscient’ is defined as ‘being aware of one’s surroundings, thoughts and motivations’. My touchstone for the podcast is episode 1, e01 terrified, based on an essay I wrote in May 2019, where I share my anxiety about the climate crisis and my belief that arts and culture can play a critical role in raising public awareness about environmental issues. The conscient podcast / balado conscient follows up on my http://simplesoundscapes.ca (2016–2019) project: 175, 3-minute audio and video field recordings that explore mindful listening.

Season 1 (May to October 2020) explored how the arts contribute to environmental awareness and action. I produced 3 episodes in French and 15 in English. The episodes cover a wide range of content, including activism, impact measurement, gaming, arts funding, cross-sectoral collaborations, social justice, artistic practices, etc. Episodes 8 to 17 were recorded while I was at the Creative Climate Leadership USA course in Arizona in March 2020 (led by Julie’s Bicycle). Episode 18 is a compilation of highlights from these conversations.

Season 2 (March 2021 – ) explores the concept of reality and is about accepting reality, working through ecological grief and charting a path forward. The first episode of season 2 (e19 reality) mixes quotations from 28 authors with field recordings from simplesoundscapes and from my 1998 soundscape composition, Au dernier vivant les biens. One of my findings from this episode is that ‘I now see, and more importantly, I now feel in my bones, ‘the state of things as they actually exist’, without social filters or unsustainable stories blocking the way’. e19 reality touches upon 7 topics: our perception of reality, the possibility of human extinction, ecological anxiety and ecological grief, hope, arts, storytelling and the wisdom of indigenous cultures. The rest of season 2 features interviews with thought leaders about their responses and reactions to e19 reality.

my professional services

I’ve been retired from the Canada Council for the Arts since September 15, 2020 where I served as a senior strategic advisor in arts granting (2016-2020) and manager of the Inter-Arts Office (1999-2015). My focus in (quasi) retirement is environmental issues within my area of expertise in arts and culture, in particular in acoustic ecology. I’m open to become involved in projects that align with my values and that move forward environmental concerns. Feel free to email me for a conversation : claude@conscient.ca

acknowledgement of eco-responsibility

I acknowledge that the production of the conscient podcast / balado conscient produces carbon. I try to minimize this carbon footprint by being as efficient as possible, including using GreenGeeks as my web server and acquiring carbon offsets for my equipment and travel activities from BullFrog Power and Less.

a word about privilege and bias

While recording episode 19 ‘reality’, I heard elements of ‘privilege’ in my voice that I had not noticed before. It sounded a bit like ‘ecological mansplaining’. I realize that, in spite of good intentions, I need to work my way through issues of privilege (of all kinds) and unconscious bias the way I did through ecological anxiety and grief during the fall of 2020. My re-education is ongoing.

Go to conscient.ca

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The Arctic Cycle: Dispatch to the Future

Join us in New York City for Dispatch to the Future, the official kick off of Climate Change Theatre Action 2021, a three-month festival of participatory theatre and action around climate taking place in more than 30 countries around the world.

Sunday, September 19, 2021 – Rain or Shine!
New York City’s Central Park @ West 103rd Street
Every half hour from 12:00-4:00 pm
$15 tickets

Featuring original short plays by Angella Emurwon (Uganda), Jessica Huang (US), Aleya Kassam (Kenya), and Marcus Youssef with Seth Klein (Canada), with additional text by Chantal Bilodeau, Dispatch to the Future takes you on a 75-minute interactive guided walk through a series of live performances tucked away in green oases. In turn poetic, political, and whimsical, this event aims to be a joyful and family-friendly experience. You will also be invited to participate in the Climate Ribbon arts ritual, launched at the Climate March in NYC in 2014.

The walk and the plays are directed by Lanxing Fu, Megan Paradis Hanley, Rad Pereira, and Jeremy Pickard. Produced by Sami Pyne.

GET YOUR TICKET NOW

Our entire cast and crew is fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Groups will be limited to 15 people. Masks are optional for fully vaccinated individuals based on personal comfort levels, but we ask that you wear one if you are not vaccinated. We will follow CDC guidelines as they continue to evolve.

Calling all Stage Designers: Climate Change Theatre Action EcoDesign Charrette

The Centre for Sustainable Practice in the Arts (CSPA) and Triga Creative (Triga) invites you to our second Eco-Design Charrette taking place between September 19th and December 18th, 2021.  This year we will be hosting our events online, as part of the Climate Change Theatre Action Festival (Climate Change Theatre Action). The Eco-Design Charrette aims to fuel each participant with the knowledge and inspiration needed to design with an ecological consciousness. Through rapid design seeding and idea exchange we will expand how we imagine scenography and its power to change our world. 

This online Eco-Design Charrette is centred on the creation of concepts for each of the fifty Climate Change Theatre Action Plays (Playwrights). Over the span of the Charrette each participating designer will create a seed concept for at least one of the short plays. Our intention is not to ask designers for fully fleshed out designs, but to begin a design concept with ecological thinking at the centre of the creative process. In order to support this work and create a context for the cross pollination of ideas, Triga Creative will host a series of short play readings, design conversations and eco-scenography workshops.

The Eco-Design Charrette period will be an opportunity to develop your eco-scenographic practice alongside other designers and generate concepts for publication and exhibition with an international reach. All designs generated during the Eco-Design Charrette will be published in a two-part volume by the Centre for Sustainable Practices in the Arts (Books). The designs will also be exhibited at World Stage Design in Calgary in 2022 (WSD2022 Exhibition). The charrette will culminate the global participatory CCTA festival with an online closing celebration during which we will share the work created with our international community.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED

Send Triga Creative a statement of interest in the Eco-Design Charrette to hello@trigacreative.com with the subject line “Charrette Application” before midnight on September 6th, 2021. Please include an overview of your previous design experience, your interest in eco-scenography, and your availability to participate in up to two sessions of programming per week between September 19th and December 18th, 2021.

We will be creating the schedule with consideration of everyone’s availability and with the intention of making our programming as accessible as possible across all time zones. Please be specific about which time zone your availability is relative to. Note that availability for all of the programming is not required for participation.

We will review all of the submitted letters and be in touch with everyone before September 19th, 2021. If you have any questions please write to Alexandra Lord, Shannon Lea Doyle and Michelle Tracey at hello@trigacreative.com. We would be happy to hear from you!

Featured Image: Seed Concept for Nibi (Water) Protectors By Corey Payette, Designed by Kim Sue Bartnik for the 2019 CCTA EcoDesign Charrette

Report Launch and Discussion: Art and The World After This

The Metcalf Foundation invites you to join us for the virtual report launch of Art and the World After This, which will feature a presentation by David Maggs — sharing key ideas from the paper — and a thought-provoking panel discussion with leading international voices in the arts.

Date: September 15, 2021
Time: 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm ET (via Zoom)
We are delighted to announce that we will be joined by:

  • Marcus Youssef, International Associate Artist at Farnham Maltings in the UK and a Playwright in Residence at Tarragon Theatre
  • Diane Ragsdale, Director of Cultural Leadership at Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity
  • Hasan Bakhshi, Director of the Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre at Nesta

Together, with David, they will discuss key questions posed by the paper as well as the wider implications for the arts sector and beyond.

Learn more: davidmaggs.eventbrite.ca

REGISTER TODAY


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Conscient Podcast: e54 garrett – empowering artists

I don’t want to confuse the end of an ecologically unsustainable, untenable way of civilization working in this moment with a complete guarantee of extinction. There is a future. It may look very different and sometimes I think the inability to see exactly what that future is – and our plan for it – can be confused for there not being one. I’m sort of okay with that uncertainty, and in the meantime, all one can really do is the work to try and make whatever it ends up being more positive. There’s a sense of biophilia about it.

ian garrett, conscient podcast, may 25, 2021, toronto

Ian Garrett is an artist, designer, producer, educator, and researcher in the field of sustainability in arts and culture. Ian is Associate Professor of Ecological Design for Performance at York University in Toronto, is the co-founder and director of the Centre for Sustainable Practice in the Arts (CSPA), and Producer at ToasterLab. Ian maintains a practice focused on the integration of sustainability, design, and technology in performance and performing environments. He has spoken and consulted on the arts and the environment around the world. Originally from Los Angeles, Ian has also called Houston and now Toronto home, where he lives with wife Justine and their two dual citizens, Miles and Henrietta.

I’ve known Ian for many years as a leading thinker and activist in arts and sustainability. He is a hard worker, a visionary and generous person. Our conscient conversation covered many topics including one that I had not touched upon yet this season, including arts and sustainability in the digital world.

We also talked about measurement of impact, such as the Creative Green project, which is at the heart of our ability to move forward as an arts sector in the climate emergency. 

Some notable quotes from our conversation include: 

The extreme thought experiment that I like to use in a performance context is: if you had a play in which the audience left with their minds changed about all of their activities, you could say that that is positive. But, if the set that it took place on was a pile of burning tires – which is an objectively bad thing to do for the environment – there is a conversation by framing it as an arts practice as to is there value in having that impact, because of the greater impact. And those sorts of complexities have sort of defined the fusion and different approaches in which to take; it’s not just around metrics.

The intent of it [the Julie’s Bicycle Creative Green Tools] is not like LEED in which you are getting certified because you have come up with a precise carbon footprint. It’s a tool for, essentially, decision-making in that artistic context, that if you know this information, then you have a better way to consider critically the way that you are making and what you’re making and how you are representing your values and those aspects, regardless of whether or not it is explicitly part of the work. And so there’s lots of tools in which I’ve had the opportunity to have a relationship with which that are really about empowering artists, arts makers, arts collectives to be able to make those decisions so that their individual values towards sustainability – regardless of what they’re actually making – can also be represented and that they can make choices that best represent those regardless of whether or not they’re explicitly creating something for ‘earth day’.

The separation of the artist from the person and articulating as a profession is a unique thing, whereas an alternative to that could just be that we are expressive and artistic beings that seeks to create and have different talents but turning that into a profession is something that we’ve done to ourselves and so while we do that, we exist within systems, our cultural organizations exist within systems, that have impacts much farther outside of it so that a systems analysis approach is really important.

As I have done in all episodes in season 2 so far, I have integrated excerpts from soundscape compositions and quotations drawn from e19 reality, as well as moments of silence, in this episode.

I would like to thank Ian for taking the time to speak with me and for sharing his deep knowledge of arts and sustainability, his passion for education, his leadership on tool development and his keen sense of ‘what’s next’ on the horizon.  

For more information on Ian’s work, see https://www.ianpgarrett.com

Additional Link

NAC Climate Change cycle, part 2: Green Rooms 2020 The Earth is Watching… Let’s Act

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(translation)

Je ne veux pas confondre la fin d’un mode de civilisation écologiquement non viable, intenable, fonctionnant en ce moment, avec une garantie totale d’extinction. Il y a un avenir. Il peut sembler très différent et parfois je pense que l’incapacité à voir exactement ce qu’est ce futur – et notre plan pour cela – peut être confondue avec le fait qu’il n’y en a pas. Je suis plutôt d’accord avec cette incertitude et, en attendant, tout ce que l’on peut faire, c’est de travailler pour essayer de faire en sorte que l’avenir, quel qu’il soit, soit plus positif. Il y a un sentiment de biophilie.

ian garrett, balado conscient, 25 mai 2021, toronto

Ian Garrett est un artiste, designer, producteur, éducateur et chercheur dans le domaine de la durabilité dans les arts et la culture. Il est professeur agrégé de design écologique pour la performance à l’Université York de Toronto, cofondateur et directeur du Centre for Sustainable Practice in the Arts (CSPA), et producteur a ToasterLab. Ian maintient une pratique axée sur l’intégration de la durabilité, du design et de la technologie dans les performances et les environnements de spectacle. Il a donné des conférences et des consultations sur les arts et l’environnement dans le monde entier. Originaire de Los Angeles, Ian s’est également installé à Houston et maintenant à Toronto, où il vit avec sa conjointe Justine et leurs deux concitoyens, Miles et Henrietta.

Je connais Ian depuis de nombreuses années en tant que penseur et activiste de premier plan dans le domaine des arts et de la durabilité. C’est un travailleur acharné, un visionnaire et une personne généreuse. Notre conversation consciente a porté sur de nombreux sujets, dont un que je n’avais pas encore abordé cette saison soit les arts et la durabilité dans le monde numérique. 

Nous avons également parlé de la mesure de l’impact, comme le projet Creative Green, qui est au cœur de notre capacité à aller de l’avant en tant que secteur artistique dans l’urgence climatique. 

Voici quelques-unes de mes citations les plus notables de notre conversation : 

L’expérience de pensée extrême que j’aime utiliser dans le contexte d’une performance est la suivante : si vous avez une pièce de théâtre dans laquelle le public part en ayant changé d’avis sur toutes ses activités, vous pouvez dire que c’est positif. Mais si le décor sur lequel elle se déroule est un tas de pneus en feu – ce qui est objectivement une mauvaise chose pour l’environnement – il y a une conversation en l’encadrant comme une pratique artistique pour savoir s’il y a une valeur à avoir cet impact, à cause de l’impact plus grand. Et ces complexités ont en quelque sorte défini la fusion et les différentes approches à adopter ; il ne s’agit pas seulement de mesures.

L’objectif [des outils verts créatifs de la bicyclette de Julie] n’est pas d’obtenir la certification LEED parce que vous avez établi une empreinte carbone précise. Il s’agit essentiellement d’un outil d’aide à la décision dans un contexte artistique. En effet, si vous connaissez ces informations, vous serez mieux à même d’examiner d’un œil critique la manière dont vous créez, ce que vous faites et comment vous représentez vos valeurs et ces aspects, qu’ils fassent ou non explicitement partie de votre travail. Il existe donc un grand nombre d’outils avec lesquels j’ai eu l’occasion d’établir une relation et qui visent à donner aux artistes, aux créateurs d’art et aux collectifs artistiques les moyens de prendre ces décisions afin que leurs valeurs individuelles en matière de durabilité – indépendamment de ce qu’ils font réellement – puissent également être représentées et qu’ils puissent faire les choix qui les représentent le mieux, qu’ils créent explicitement ou non quelque chose pour la “Journée de la Terre”.

La séparation de l’artiste de la personne et l’articulation en tant que profession est une chose unique, alors qu’une alternative à cela pourrait simplement être que nous sommes des êtres expressifs et artistiques qui cherchent à créer et ont différents talents, mais transformer cela en une profession est quelque chose que nous nous sommes fait à nous-mêmes et donc pendant que nous faisons cela, nous existons au sein de systèmes, nos organisations culturelles existent au sein de systèmes, qui ont des impacts beaucoup plus loin à l’extérieur, de sorte qu’une approche d’analyse des systèmes est vraiment importante.

Comme je l’ai fait dans tous les épisodes de la saison 2 jusqu’à présent, j’ai intégré dans cet épisode des extraits de compositions de paysages sonores et des citations tirées de e19 reality, ainsi que des moments de silence.

Je tiens à remercier Ian d’avoir pris le temps de s’entretenir avec moi et de m’avoir fait part de sa connaissance approfondie des arts et de la durabilité, de sa passion pour l’éducation, de son leadership en matière de développement d’outils et de son sens aigu de ce qui se profile à l’horizon. 

Pour en savoir plus sur le travail de Ian, consultez le site https://www.ianpgarrett.com/  

Lien supplémentaire

The post e54 garrett – empowering artists appeared first on conscient podcast / balado conscient. conscient is a bilingual blog and podcast (French or English) by audio artist Claude Schryer that explores how arts and culture contribute to environmental awareness and action.

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About the Concient Podcast from Claude Schryer

The conscient podcast / balado conscient is a series of conversations about art, conscience and the ecological crisis. This podcast is bilingual (in either English or French). The language of the guest determines the language of the podcast. Episode notes are translated but not individual interviews.

I started the conscient project in 2020 as a personal learning journey and knowledge sharing exercise. It has been rewarding, and sometimes surprising.

The term ‘conscient’ is defined as ‘being aware of one’s surroundings, thoughts and motivations’. My touchstone for the podcast is episode 1, e01 terrified, based on an essay I wrote in May 2019, where I share my anxiety about the climate crisis and my belief that arts and culture can play a critical role in raising public awareness about environmental issues. The conscient podcast / balado conscient follows up on my http://simplesoundscapes.ca (2016–2019) project: 175, 3-minute audio and video field recordings that explore mindful listening.

Season 1 (May to October 2020) explored how the arts contribute to environmental awareness and action. I produced 3 episodes in French and 15 in English. The episodes cover a wide range of content, including activism, impact measurement, gaming, arts funding, cross-sectoral collaborations, social justice, artistic practices, etc. Episodes 8 to 17 were recorded while I was at the Creative Climate Leadership USA course in Arizona in March 2020 (led by Julie’s Bicycle). Episode 18 is a compilation of highlights from these conversations.

Season 2 (March 2021 – ) explores the concept of reality and is about accepting reality, working through ecological grief and charting a path forward. The first episode of season 2 (e19 reality) mixes quotations from 28 authors with field recordings from simplesoundscapes and from my 1998 soundscape composition, Au dernier vivant les biens. One of my findings from this episode is that ‘I now see, and more importantly, I now feel in my bones, ‘the state of things as they actually exist’, without social filters or unsustainable stories blocking the way’. e19 reality touches upon 7 topics: our perception of reality, the possibility of human extinction, ecological anxiety and ecological grief, hope, arts, storytelling and the wisdom of indigenous cultures. The rest of season 2 features interviews with thought leaders about their responses and reactions to e19 reality.

my professional services

I’ve been retired from the Canada Council for the Arts since September 15, 2020 where I served as a senior strategic advisor in arts granting (2016-2020) and manager of the Inter-Arts Office (1999-2015). My focus in (quasi) retirement is environmental issues within my area of expertise in arts and culture, in particular in acoustic ecology. I’m open to become involved in projects that align with my values and that move forward environmental concerns. Feel free to email me for a conversation : claude@conscient.ca

acknowledgement of eco-responsibility

I acknowledge that the production of the conscient podcast / balado conscient produces carbon. I try to minimize this carbon footprint by being as efficient as possible, including using GreenGeeks as my web server and acquiring carbon offsets for my equipment and travel activities from BullFrog Power and Less.

a word about privilege and bias

While recording episode 19 ‘reality’, I heard elements of ‘privilege’ in my voice that I had not noticed before. It sounded a bit like ‘ecological mansplaining’. I realize that, in spite of good intentions, I need to work my way through issues of privilege (of all kinds) and unconscious bias the way I did through ecological anxiety and grief during the fall of 2020. My re-education is ongoing.

Go to conscient.ca

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Jessica Segall: Queer Ecologies

By Etty Yaniv

Throughout her highly imaginative multidisciplinary projects, Jessica Segall has been engaging with a wide range of fragile ecological sites, frequently with animals as her collaborators – for instance, swimming with tigers and sculpting with live bees. In this interview, Segall shares some of her work and thought processes, and talks about her upcoming projects. 

You are a multidisciplinary artist using a diverse range of media, some most unconventional – lemons, refrigerators, tigers. How do you choose your media? Can you give me a couple of examples?

The media in each work is chosen for its utility or ability to best answer a proposition. There also has to be a transformation. Usually one of the material questions is: Will this work? Sometimes half of the proposition hangs in the air for a while until I find its material counterpoint. Fugue in B Flat started that way, as a material prompt and then a proposal before it became a sculpture. I had always wanted to work with the free pianos available off of Craigslist – its an unusually available material in our time and place. Pianos once had high enough value in craftsmanship and social meaning that families would pay to have them hauled up flights of stairs. But today, an inherited piano is not worth enough to sell, or pay to have removed, so every day there are new pianos available for free in New York City.

Years later, when I was learning to keep bees, the piano resurfaced. Bees are the last animals we colonized into livestock. In more primitive beekeeping methods, bees formed their own hive structures in skeps, or baskets. But to more efficiently extract the honey without harming bees, the idea of “bee space” was utilized, which determines the size of beehive boxes and frame proximity. While the interior architecture of the beehive is laid out within 3/8 of an inch, the superstructure of a beehive could be anything, which led me to consider the piano as a potential hive, considering the available space in between the soundboard and harp.

There are other reasons to work with pianos and bees of course – I play music, studied Anthroposophy and am invested in ecological futures. But practically, the material has to perform.

Zzzzzzz, 30″ x 40″, photograph, 2016
Fugue in B Flat, 8′ x 5′ x 2′, piano, bees, live audio feed, 2016
Fugue in B Flat (detail), 8′ x 5′ x 2′, piano, bees, live audio feed, 2016

In your site-specific work, you seem to be drawn to vulnerable ecological sites. Can you talk a bit on what draws you there?

Yes, the sites I chose to work in have great ecological vulnerability, or speak to human vulnerability. They deal with both the human and geological timescales. The Arctic is a timeless space, a geological era before and after human life on earth. Placing the Global Seed Vault on Svalbard was a way of safekeeping our genetic future, but even there, the permafrost is unreliable, in a big part from our own making. I treated my visit to the agricultural basin of California as disaster tourism – the almond blooms in my photos are often confused for the cherry blossom in Japan. But that beauty is monoculture relying on the major efforts of on-demand water and pollination services. In a way, these are all economic landscapes, shaped by human consumption.

What do you think brought you to art?

Honestly, I was too young to remember! My first painting was on my grandfather’s easel. My family introduced me to art culture and activism from a young age. Growing up, I had a great-uncle who made kinetic Dada sculptures, and my cousin was a performance artist in the East Village in the 90s. Both my parents wrote books. Luckily there was a public arts school where I grew up so I’ve been focused on art for a long time.

I was attracted to the radical criticality of art. Its queer culture and discourse. I never imagined how much time I would spend writing grant proposals.

Tell me about “Nom Nom Ohm,” your installation from 2016. In the list of material I found fruits, root vegetables, and rewired chandeliers.

“Nom Nom Ohm” is in a vein of work examining alternative power sources and degrowth. It is also a modern day vanitas. They are chandeliers that are rewired to be powered by fruits and vegetables. I liked the idea of the chandeliers in the marketplace, powered by the fruits sold there and proposed this work to Cuchifritos in The Essex Market in New York City. The market was about to be relocated and this work was something of a visual for the transition from this long-standing neighborhood market into high rise luxury apartments.

Nom Nom Ohm (detail), chandeliers, fruits, vegetables, copper, zinc, light, dimensions variable, 2016. Photo by Bill Massey.

What can you tell me about your 2018 two-channel video installation “Un-common Intimacy” described on your website as “Performance swimming with predators at private wildlife parks in the United States.”

“Un-common Intimacy” was shot in private wildlife reserves in the six US states that allow private ownership of large predators. Today, there are more tigers in captivity than in the wild; strange colonial ecosystems that rely on private property but also voluntary guardians in service to a nexus of entertainment and conservation economies. That’s the setting. What you see in the video work is more of a blank slate as its filmed entirely underwater. I’m swimming with tigers and alligators, capturing the potential intimacies under these conditions.

Un-common intimacy, installation view, 2018Courtesy of Fons Welters Gallery.

Performance seems to be a constant in your work. In 2009, you had a performance called Tourist Crisis Center in collaboration with Tourist Artist Collective. I am curious to know more about that.

This was a project in collaboration with several other artists I studied with at Bard College – Anne Cleary, Jess Perlitz, Brigid McCaffrey and Jane Parrot. We were invited, via friend and poet Arlo Haskell, to The Studios of Key West to make a public work. Somehow we resolved to build an offshore public office for tourists in crisis. Symptoms included fugue states, and other crises one experiences when shifting from worker to full-time consumer. We built an office on dock floats, complete with a fax machine, a telephone, office plants and a rolling chair, while Arlo pulled us around the island with his boat, dropping us off at key points for public interface. We took turns manning the office, while dressed in our secretarial finest. Some of us helped tourists write letters home. Key West is the kind of unbelievable community that only gathers in the farthest reaches of land masses. We were stopped by the Coast Guard at one point by a concerned caller phoning in “a lady being dragged on a desk.” We were also stopped by border patrol as we tried to swim from our desk to shore, in the logic that we were a ruse for illegal immigration. That was in 2009. I can’t imagine what the politic would be today.

Artist as Tourist Collective, Tourist Crisis Center, desk, fax machine, typewriter, plants, 2009

Where do you think your work is heading now?

On the horizon is a mix of studio work in Brooklyn and opening up my practice to coordinating public events and activism. I am co-organizing a lecture series at my studio in Brooklyn on economy, ecology, and trust, along with other ways of seeing our environment – through queer ecologies and animism. There are several long term projects I’m working on strategizing land art as land conservation; methods to counteract increasing privatization of federal land, and the militarization of our borders.

In the studio I will be working on new multi-species sculptures and a video work making parallels between climate change and BDSM. I will be traveling a bit for site-specific work in Finland, France, and Columbia while keeping a studio base in Brooklyn.

(Top image: Un-common intimacy, video still, 2018. All photos courtesy of the artist unless otherwise indicated.)

This interview is part of a content collaboration between Art Spiel and Artists & Climate Change. It was originally published on Art Spiel on April 10, 2019 as part of an ongoing interview series with contemporary artists.

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Etty Yaniv works on her art, art writing, and curatorial projects in Brooklyn. She has exhibited her immersive installations in museums and galleries, nationally and internationally. Yaniv founded the platform Art Spiel to highlight the work of contemporary artists through art reviews, studio visits, and interviews with artists, curators, and gallerists. Yaniv holds a BA in Psychology and English Literature from Tel Aviv University, a BFA from Parsons School of Design, and an MFA from SUNY Purchase.

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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