Monthly Archives: December 2021

Rising: Climate in Crisis Residencies at A Studio in the Woods

Rising: Climate in Crisis Residencies at A Studio in the Woods invite artists to face the severity of the climate crisis and be agents of change to guide our collective understanding, response, and vision as we shape our shared future. New Orleans and the inhabitants of our region are frequently invoked as some of the most vulnerable to the effects of environmental degradation. While sea levels, temperatures and emotions are rising, our highly manipulated landscape can be seen as a microcosm of the global environment, manifesting both the reckoning and hope which are required in the ways humans interact with shifting urban and natural ecosystems. As the climate crisis permeates the collective understanding of the future, the challenges faced by Southern Louisiana resonate exponentially. We look to artists to ignite our imaginations, illuminate our challenges, and offer new ways to examine the world.

Rising Residencies will provide artists with time, space, scholarship and staff support to foster critical thinking and creation of new works. The call is open to artists of all disciplines who have demonstrated an established dialogue with environmental and culturally related issues and a commitment to seeking and plumbing new depths. We ask artists to describe in detail how the region will affect their work, to propose a public component to their residency and to suggest ways in which they will engage with the local community.

Direct questions to Cammie Hill-Prewitt at info@astudiointhewoods.org.

PLEASE REVIEW OUR FAQ BEFORE YOU BEGIN YOUR APPLICATION

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS 
Proposals are due March 10, 2022 and residencies will be awarded by May 23, 2022.

DATES 
Residencies are 6 weeks and will take place between September 2022 and May 2023. Flexibility in your dates is appreciated as we try to accommodate everyone’s schedules. You may come over six consecutive weeks or come twice for three-week sessions.

ARTIST ELIGIBILITY 
Local, national, and international visual, musician/composing, performance, literary, new media, and interdisciplinary artists are eligible to apply. Both established and emerging artists may apply, but a dedicated practice and demonstrated commitment to public engagement are expected. Artists of color are encouraged to apply and we are particularly interested in receiving applications from Indigenous artists. Students enrolled in full time degree-seeking programs are not eligible. Collaborative teams of up to two artists can be in residence, please see our FAQ for more information on how to apply as a collaborative team.

SELECTION PROCESS A multidisciplinary jury comprised of artists, arts professionals and environmental activists will review applications in two rounds. The first round will happen asynchronously and jurors will review and rank all applications. Top contenders will be moved to a second round that happens live. We offer to share anonymized jury feedback to all applicants. The jury will judge proposals on the following criteria:

  • The creativity and integrity of the proposal
  • Demonstrated ability to collaborate with colleagues and wider audiences
  • Projects that are deeply respectful of the communities and individuals with whom they interact
  • The proposal’s public component and its depth of engagement with the community

SUPPORT 
Recipients will be provided $3000 as a stipend and $2000 towards materials. Artists will also have the opportunity to work with an external evaluator/ally. Depending on the needs of the project, we may be able to assist artists in accessing Tulane University faculty consultants or research collections. We provide full room and board including food, utilities for living and studio space to selected residents. Residents are expected to cover personal living expenses, additional materials and supplies, and any other expenses relating to the cost of producing work incurred while in the program. Travel and shipping expenses to and from A Studio in the Woods for the residency are also the responsibility of the artist.

MORE INFO AND TO APPLY

Conscient Podcast: e81 – inspiration

e81 inspiration are excerpts from all my #conscientpodcast conversations up to today, November 10th, 2021. I chose short excerpts where the tone and emotion in the voice of each person inspires and uplifts me every time I listen to it and I hope they will inspire and uplift you too (because we need it). Thanks to all those recorded for this fragmented reading of our conversations. 
é81 inspiration sont des extraits de toutes mes conversations #baladoconscient jusqu’à aujourd’hui le 10 novembre 2021. J’ai choisi des extraits où le ton et l'émotion dans la voix de la personne m'inspirent et m’encouragent profondément. J'espère qu'ils vous inspireront et vous encourageront aussi (parce que nous en avons besoin). Merci à toutes les personnes enregistrées pour cette lecture fragmentée de nos conversations. 

In order of appearance (bolded episodes are in French and have an ‘é’)

Note: I am aware that the time indication numbers below do not align up well but chose not to correct it as I enjoy the uneven flow… 

Note : Je suis conscient que les chiffres de l’indication de temps ci-dessous ne sont pas bien alignés mais j’ai choisi de ne pas les corriger car j’apprécie le flux irrégulier…

  • e10 mwase, Rebecca Mwase                                            00:00
  • e29 loy, David Loy                                                               00:21
  • e03 tickell, Alison Tickell                                                   00:35
  • é37 lebeau, Anne-Catherine Lebeau                          00:56
  • 12 liverman, Diana Liverman                                            01:16
  • 17 piro, Em Piro                                                                   01:37
  • e50 newton, Teika Newton                                               02:00
  • é32 tsou, Shuni Tsou                                                        02:26
  • 13 freiband, Andrew Freiband                                         02:46
  • e58 huddart, Stephen Huddart                                        03:03
  • é27 prévost, Hélène Prévost                                         03:30
  • e47 keeptwo, Suzanne Keeptwo                                      04:00
  • 08 johnston,  Sholeh Johnston                                         04:25
  • e33 toscano, Peterson Toscano                                       04:51
  • é60 boutet, Dr. Danielle Boutet                                   05 :20
  • e51 hiser, Dr. Krista Hiser                                                  05:42
  • e53 kalmanovitch, Dr. Tanya Kalmanovitch                   06:01
  • e21 dufresne, Dr. Todd Dufresne                                    06:22
  • é55 trépanier, France Trépanier                                  06:42
  • e24 weaving, jil p. weaving                                               07:00
  • e25 shaw, Michael Shaw                                                    07:38
  • e39 engle  Dr. Jayne Engle                                               08:01
  • é56 garoufalis-auger, Anthony Garoufalis-Auger 08 :19
  • e54 garrett, Ian Garrett                                                      08:46
  • 06 lim, Milton Lim                                                                09:48
  • e22 westerkamp, Hildegard Westerkamp                     09:25
  • é57 roy, Annie Roy                                                           09:50
  • e73 marcuse,,Judith Marcuse                                           10:19
  • e26 klein, Seth Klein                                                           10:58
  • e36 fanconi,  Kendra Fanconi                                           11 :26
  • é28 ung, Jimmy Ung                                                        11:47
  • e40 frasz  Alexis Frasz                                                         12:10
  • e41 rae, Jen Rae                                                                  12:27
  • e42 rosen, Mark Rosen                                                      12:52
  • é48 danis, Daniel Danis                                                  13:17
  • e43 haley, David Haley                                                      13:57
  • e44 bilodeau, Chantal Bilodeau                                      14:32
  • e45 abbott, Jennifer Abbott                                             15:13
  • é60 boutet, Dr. Danielle Boutet                                   16 :03
  • e49 windatt, Clayton Windatt                                           16:33
  • e50 newton, Teika Newton                                               16:53
  • e51 hiser, Dr. Krista Hiser                                                  17:30
  • 07 kasisi, Robert Kasisi                                                   17:52
  • e52 mahtani, Dr. Annie Mahtani                                      18 :23
  • e53 kalmanovitch, Dr. Tanya Kalmanovitch                   18:49
  • e68 davies, Andrew Davies                                               19:20
  • é34 ramade, Bénédicte Ramade                                  19:47
  •  e61sokoloski, Robin Sokoloski                                        20:12
  • e46 badham, Dr Marnie Badham                                    20:39
  • e43 haley, David Haley                                                      21:01
  • é55 trépanier, France Trépanier                                  21:16
  • e38 zenith, Shante’ Sojourn Zenith                                  21:37
  • e30 maggs, David Maggs                                                 22:22
  • e23 appadurai, Anjali Appadurai                                     22:56
  • é48 danis, Daniel Danis                                                  22:14
  • e21 dufresne, Dr. Todd Dufresne                                    24 :57
  • e35 salas, Carmen Salas                                                    25:46
  • e31 morrow, Charlie Morrow                                           26:27
  • é57 roy, Annie Roy                                                           26:53
  • e59 pearl,  Judi Pearl                                                          27:29
  • e71 green sessions debrief, Emma Stenning                27:49
  • e78 droumeva, Milena Droumeva                                   29:11
  • 04 fel, Loic Fel                                                                    29:54
  • 05 carruthers, Beth Carruthers                                         30:15
  • e77 klein, Seth Klein                                                           30:45
  • e15 chasansky, Matthew Chassansky                              31:15
  • é55 trépanier, France Trépanier                                  32:00
  • e71 green sessions debrief, Sandy Crawley                  32:22
  • e11 dunlap, Eliana Dunlap                                                33;11
  • e71 green sessions debrief, Liisa Repo-Martell            33:34
  • e63 a case study (part 1), Clara Schryer                       34:11
  • 09 macmahon, Ellen MacMahon                                     34:24              
  • e76 richards, Kim Richards                                                34:50
  • e16 delaparra, Lauren De la Parra                                   35:28 
  • é37 lebeau, Anne-Catherine Lebeau                          36:07
  • 14 kirn, Marda Kirn                                                             36:30
  • e63 a case study (part 1), Clara Schryer, Riel Schryer 37:38
  • e71 green sessions debrief, Robyn Stevan                    38:18
  •  e64 a case study (2), Clara Schyrer, Sabrina Mathews 38:50
The post e81 – inspiration appeared first on conscient podcast / balado conscient. conscient is a bilingual blog and podcast (French or English) by audio artist Claude Schryer that explores how arts and culture contribute to environmental awareness and action.

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About the Concient Podcast from Claude Schryer

The conscient podcast / balado conscient is a series of conversations about art, conscience and the ecological crisis. This podcast is bilingual (in either English or French). The language of the guest determines the language of the podcast. Episode notes are translated but not individual interviews.

I started the conscient project in 2020 as a personal learning journey and knowledge sharing exercise. It has been rewarding, and sometimes surprising.

The term ‘conscient’ is defined as ‘being aware of one’s surroundings, thoughts and motivations’. My touchstone for the podcast is episode 1, e01 terrified, based on an essay I wrote in May 2019, where I share my anxiety about the climate crisis and my belief that arts and culture can play a critical role in raising public awareness about environmental issues. The conscient podcast / balado conscient follows up on my http://simplesoundscapes.ca (2016–2019) project: 175, 3-minute audio and video field recordings that explore mindful listening.

Season 1 (May to October 2020) explored how the arts contribute to environmental awareness and action. I produced 3 episodes in French and 15 in English. The episodes cover a wide range of content, including activism, impact measurement, gaming, arts funding, cross-sectoral collaborations, social justice, artistic practices, etc. Episodes 8 to 17 were recorded while I was at the Creative Climate Leadership USA course in Arizona in March 2020 (led by Julie’s Bicycle). Episode 18 is a compilation of highlights from these conversations.

Season 2 (March 2021 – ) explores the concept of reality and is about accepting reality, working through ecological grief and charting a path forward. The first episode of season 2 (e19 reality) mixes quotations from 28 authors with field recordings from simplesoundscapes and from my 1998 soundscape composition, Au dernier vivant les biens. One of my findings from this episode is that ‘I now see, and more importantly, I now feel in my bones, ‘the state of things as they actually exist’, without social filters or unsustainable stories blocking the way’. e19 reality touches upon 7 topics: our perception of reality, the possibility of human extinction, ecological anxiety and ecological grief, hope, arts, storytelling and the wisdom of indigenous cultures. The rest of season 2 features interviews with thought leaders about their responses and reactions to e19 reality.

my professional services

I’ve been retired from the Canada Council for the Arts since September 15, 2020 where I served as a senior strategic advisor in arts granting (2016-2020) and manager of the Inter-Arts Office (1999-2015). My focus in (quasi) retirement is environmental issues within my area of expertise in arts and culture, in particular in acoustic ecology. I’m open to become involved in projects that align with my values and that move forward environmental concerns. Feel free to email me for a conversation : claude@conscient.ca

acknowledgement of eco-responsibility

I acknowledge that the production of the conscient podcast / balado conscient produces carbon. I try to minimize this carbon footprint by being as efficient as possible, including using GreenGeeks as my web server and acquiring carbon offsets for my equipment and travel activities from BullFrog Power and Less.

a word about privilege and bias

While recording episode 19 ‘reality’, I heard elements of ‘privilege’ in my voice that I had not noticed before. It sounded a bit like ‘ecological mansplaining’. I realize that, in spite of good intentions, I need to work my way through issues of privilege (of all kinds) and unconscious bias the way I did through ecological anxiety and grief during the fall of 2020. My re-education is ongoing.

Go to conscient.ca

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Embracing Uncertainty

By Jennifer Atkinson

Eco-anxiety and climate grief are sometimes framed as “disorders,” but in fact these feelings typically arise from an accurate perception of our ecological crisis. It may be more appropriate to identify eco-anxiety as a “moral emotion” – a sign of compassion, attachment to life, and desire for justice. And so paradoxically, we can take some encouragement from the global increase in eco-anxiety and climate grief, since our very existential discomfort affirms a desire to live in a more just and sustainable world.

Because the fight for climate solutions is filled with such contradictions, this episode explores some ways we are strengthened by challenging easy assumptions about climate distress. Our future remains unwritten, and by embracing the unknown we are better able to reframe our thinking in empowering ways. So-called “negative” feelings that arise in response to ecological disruption (grief, anxiety, anger) can be seen as signs of emotional health, while “undesirable” states like uncertainty are potential doorways to transformation. Climate anxiety might even be seen as a kind of superpower – a signal that alerts us when something’s wrong and needs to be addressed, especially while others are sleepwalking through the crisis. As Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “the salvation of the world lies in the hands of the maladjusted.” The time has come for the maladjusted to rise.

This episode includes extended excerpts from Rebecca Solnit and Clarissa Pinkola Estés.

(Top image by Callum Shaw via Unsplash.)

Facing It is a podcast about climate grief and eco anxiety. It explores the psychological toll of climate change, and why our emotional responses are key to addressing this existential threat. In each episode of Facing It, I explore a different way we can harness despair to activate meaningful solutions.

______________________________

Dr. Jennifer Atkinson is an Associate Professor of environmental humanities at the University of Washington, Bothell. Her seminars on Eco-Grief & Climate Anxiety have been featured in the New York TimesWashington Post Magazine, the Los Angeles TimesNBC News, the Seattle Times, Grist, the Washington PostKUOW and many other outlets. Jennifer is currently working on a book titled An Existential Toolkit for the Climate Crisis (co-edited with Sarah Jaquette Ray) that offers strategies to help young people navigate the emotional toll of climate breakdown.

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Conscient Podcast: é80 manifeste – accélérer l’action climatique grâce au pouvoir des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine

é80 est ma lecture #baladoconscient du manifeste 'Accélérer l'action climatique grâce au pouvoir des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine’ élaboré par le Climate Heritage Network pour résumer les messages culturels clés de la COP26 et activer le secteur des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine. Vous trouverez plus d'informations sur les origines et les co-auteurs du manifeste sur cultureatcop.com.

Note: la prestation lors de l’enregistrement a été improvisée à partir du scénario ci-dessous.

On est le 8 novembre 2021 et je suis sur une plage au Parc Stanley à Vancouver. Je vais vous lire dans quelques instants un manifeste et celui-ci est particulièrement bon et opportun. Je vous explique un peu comment ça s’est passé…. 

J’ai rencontré l’archéologue et le champion des musées  le Dr. Robert R. Janes,lors d’une rencontre du regroupement Leadership Sectoriel des Arts pour l’Urgence de la Transition écologique (LeSAUT)  alors que Bob parlait de son travail avec le Coalition of Museums for Climate Justice et nous nous parlons régulièrement. Il y a quelques jours Bob m’a envoyé un lien vers le manifeste Accélérer l’action climatique grâce au pouvoir des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine élaboré par le Climate Heritage Network. J’avoue que je ne connaissais pas ce manifeste et que c’est important qu’on en prenne note et qu’on écoute ce qu’ils ont à dire.

Personnellement j’ai été profondément ému par la clarté et la puissance de ces mots.

J’ai demandé, et obtenu des auteurs, la permission d’enregistrer le manifeste pour mon balado, en français avec cet épisode 80 and also an English version, episode 79). Une des raisons que je l’enregistre et je suis une personne, peut-être pas la seule, qui préfère écouter au lieu de lire et j’ai voulu faire une version audio afin de pouvoir l’écouter et je le partage avec vous, les auditeurs du balado et je voulais le faire pendant la COP26. C’est le 7 novembre 2021 et c’est donc le huitième jour de la COP26 donc c’est très à jour et j’espère que ça vous intéressera. L’enregistrement comprend la note d’introduction du manifeste, suivie du manifeste dans son intégralité. Je fais d’un coup, sans arrêt et son montage alors pardonnez-moi s’il y a des petits lapsus ici et là dans la lecture.

Vous pouvez trouver plus d’informations sur le manifeste et les co-auteurs sur le site web cultureatcop.com et vous trouverez les liens dont j’ai parlé dans les notes de l’émission.  Je tiens à remercier Bob et tous les co-auteurs du manifeste pour ce cadeau et ce réveil revigorant.

Alors, je commence avec l’introduction, voici. 

Ce Manifeste fournit des messages clés sur la culture et le changement climatique en vue de la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le climat de 2021 (COP26) et au-delà. Il vise à inciter les acteurs des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine à prendre des mesures en faveur du climat par le biais de la communication et de l’engagement, en inspirant et en aidant leurs électeurs, leurs membres et leurs publics à accroître leurs ambitions, à modifier leurs propres comportements et à s’engager dans l’élaboration de politiques en matière de changement climatique au niveau des gouvernements locaux et nationaux et au niveau intergouvernemental. Simultanément, afin de répondre à l’urgence de la situation climatique, ce Manifeste s’efforce d’inspirer et d’encourager une plus grande collaboration synergique sur l’action climatique avec d’autres secteurs et partenaires qui ne se sont pas traditionnellement engagés avec les acteurs culturels. Nous invitons la société civile, les gouvernements à tous les niveaux, les organisations de peuples autochtones, les organisations et institutions culturelles, les entreprises, les universités et les organismes de recherche et les autres parties prenantes à nous rejoindre en signant ce Manifeste, signalant ainsi notre ambition commune de créer des communautés justes, prospères et résilientes aujourd’hui et à l’avenir. 

Donc cela était l’introduction et maintenant je vais vous lire le manifeste au complet : 

Accélérer l’action climatique grâce au pouvoir des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine

Un manifeste pour ne pas perdre de vue l’objectif de 1,5°

COP26

Nous, les soussignés, déclarons que les peuples, leurs cultures et le patrimoine naturel et culturel de la Terre sont profondément menacés par le changement climatique causé par les êtres humains et par l’inaction climatique qui aggrave la crise climatique en cours, tout en réaffirmant l’immense pouvoir des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine pour inspirer l’action climatique et permettre une transition juste vers un avenir à faible émission de carbone et résilient face aux changements climatique. 

Le changement climatique a déjà un impact sur les individus et la planète, avec des effets durables et irréversibles. Pour éviter le pire, il faut limiter l’augmentation de la température mondiale à 1,5 degrés au-dessus des niveaux préindustriels. Or, le monde ne parvient même pas à atteindre l’objectif de 2 degrés fixé par l’Accord de Paris, les concentrations actuelles de gaz à effet de serre (GES) étant les plus élevées jamais enregistrées. 

La pandémie actuelle de COVID-19, et les souffrances qu’elle a causées, ont rendu la réponse au changement climatique encore plus difficile, tout en révélant des leçons essentielles, notamment l’impératif de tenir compte de la science, les conséquences de la séparation entre les êtres humains et la nature, l’importance de se concentrer sur les besoins des plus vulnérables, et le fait qu’un changement social et économique rapide et de grande envergure est possible lorsque les individus qui forment la société le souhaite et travaillent ensemble. 

Pour reconstruire en mieux, faire face aux crises du climat et de la biodiversité et parvenir à un développement durable, il faut prendre des mesures ambitieuses et transformatrices à grande échelle, notamment des réductions importantes des émissions de GES dans tous les secteurs, un large éventail d’options d’atténuation et d’adaptation et une augmentation significative des investissements dans ces options. L’équité et la justice doivent être au coeur de toutes les actions afin de pouvoir inverser les disparités croissantes en matière d’économie et de santé. La culture et les arts reflètent et influencent les modes de consommation, en reliant notre conscience de la nature et de la planète à notre relation à l’environnement. 

La culture permet d’ancrer les individus dans des lieux et entre eux. Elle peut créer une cohésion qui permet le développement de communautés et d’actions collectives. Les artistes et les voix du monde de la culture stimulent la sensibilisation et l’action du public ; leur travail peut être un outil puissant de mobilisation en faveur du climat. Grâce à l’accessibilité et à la confiance du public, les institutions culturelles telles que les musées et les bibliothèques constituent des plateformes d’écoute des communautés et des centres d’échanges multiculturels et intergénérationnels, de renforcement des capacités et de partage des connaissances. 

L’intégration des valeurs naturelles et culturelles met en évidence les liens entre les fonctions écologiques et sociales des paysages de manière à promouvoir des modes de vie en harmonie avec la nature. L’environnement historique incarne les investissements passés en matière de carbone, désormais gérés par les propriétaires et les utilisateurs des paysages et des bâtiments. Le patrimoine culturel contient les histoires des peuples et les connaissances des communautés locales (ce que l’Accord de Paris appelle les “technologies endogènes”). Les archives archéologiques illustrent les causes des changements passés et l’adaptation à ces changements. 

Pourtant, les talents de nombreux acteurs, opérateurs et défenseurs des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine n’ont toujours pas été mobilisés pour l’action climatique. Il s’agit d’artistes, d’anthropologues, d’archéologues, d’architectes, d’architectes paysagistes, d’administrateurs, d’archivistes, d’artisans, de conservateurs, d’ingénieurs, de géographes, d’historiens, de bibliothécaires, de musiciens, de muséologues, d’écrivains, d’artistes, d’urbanistes et de gestionnaires de sites, ainsi que de scientifiques, de chercheurs, d’enseignants, d’universitaires et de porteurs de savoirs autochtones, dont les connaissances uniques n’ont pas encore été appliquées de manière adéquate au changement climatique ou prises en compte dans la science du climat. 

Nous représentons des institutions et des organisations qui s’engagent à changer ce paradigme et à libérer le potentiel des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine pour réaliser les ambitions de l’Accord de Paris. Nous reconnaissons que cela doit inclure une transformation au sein du secteur culturel également, en adoptant des pratiques durables et une bonne gestion, en faisant entendre la voix des communautés défavorisées et en donnant la priorité à la solidarité avec les communautés en première ligne face au changement climatique, ainsi qu’en préservant, enregistrant et rendant la culture et le patrimoine disponibles de manière inclusive, y compris par le biais de formes artistiques traditionnelles et innovantes ainsi que de nouvelles technologies. 

Ce changement de paradigme et de mentalité exige également que les dimensions culturelles de l’action climatique soient prioritaires dans les cadres scientifiques, politiques, de planification et fiscaux pour l’atténuation et l’adaptation au climat, la réduction des risques de catastrophe et la planification des pertes et dommages. L’intégration des considérations culturelles doit se faire à toutes les échelles (locale, régionale, nationale et internationale) et dans tous les secteurs, de l’énergie aux bâtiments, de la mobilité à l’agriculture. 

Nous reconnaissons le lien profond entre les droits culturels, la survie de la culture et l’action climatique. Nous considérons également que ce Manifeste est une contribution aux approches centrées sur les êtres humains et fondées sur les droits, qui place la culture comme une dimension explicite et opérationnelle du développement et qui permet aux acteurs culturels (société civile et institutions) d’avoir voix au chapitre afin d’y parvenir. 

Il est temps d’agir. 

Nous devons combler les lacunes en matière d’émissions et d’ambition. Pour parvenir à un monde à 1,5° Celsius, il faut accorder plus d’attention aux dimensions culturelles des modes de vie et des moyens d’existence, à la compréhension publique des impacts climatiques, à l’acceptation sociale des changements de systèmes, aux approches diversifiées et sensibles au genre, et aux sources de l’ambition climatique. En bref, nous devons transcender les clivages entre la culture et la science, les personnes et les politiques, la mémoire et les pratiques évolutives. 

La COP26 doit être un tournant pour une action à plusieurs niveaux afin de réaliser le potentiel de la culture pour lutter efficacement contre la crise climatique. Il est de notre responsabilité commune de garantir l’héritage culturel et les droits culturels des générations actuelles et futures, de préserver une planète saine, prospère et résiliente, et d’assurer la réduction des émissions dont dépendent ces résultats. Dans tout ce travail, comptez sur nous ! Comptez sur la culture !

Moi sur une plage du parc Stanley, Vancouver, le 8 novembre 2021
The post é80 manifeste – accélérer l’action climatique grâce au pouvoir des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine appeared first on conscient podcast / balado conscient. conscient is a bilingual blog and podcast (French or English) by audio artist Claude Schryer that explores how arts and culture contribute to environmental awareness and action.

———-

About the Concient Podcast from Claude Schryer

The conscient podcast / balado conscient is a series of conversations about art, conscience and the ecological crisis. This podcast is bilingual (in either English or French). The language of the guest determines the language of the podcast. Episode notes are translated but not individual interviews.

I started the conscient project in 2020 as a personal learning journey and knowledge sharing exercise. It has been rewarding, and sometimes surprising.

The term ‘conscient’ is defined as ‘being aware of one’s surroundings, thoughts and motivations’. My touchstone for the podcast is episode 1, e01 terrified, based on an essay I wrote in May 2019, where I share my anxiety about the climate crisis and my belief that arts and culture can play a critical role in raising public awareness about environmental issues. The conscient podcast / balado conscient follows up on my http://simplesoundscapes.ca (2016–2019) project: 175, 3-minute audio and video field recordings that explore mindful listening.

Season 1 (May to October 2020) explored how the arts contribute to environmental awareness and action. I produced 3 episodes in French and 15 in English. The episodes cover a wide range of content, including activism, impact measurement, gaming, arts funding, cross-sectoral collaborations, social justice, artistic practices, etc. Episodes 8 to 17 were recorded while I was at the Creative Climate Leadership USA course in Arizona in March 2020 (led by Julie’s Bicycle). Episode 18 is a compilation of highlights from these conversations.

Season 2 (March 2021 – ) explores the concept of reality and is about accepting reality, working through ecological grief and charting a path forward. The first episode of season 2 (e19 reality) mixes quotations from 28 authors with field recordings from simplesoundscapes and from my 1998 soundscape composition, Au dernier vivant les biens. One of my findings from this episode is that ‘I now see, and more importantly, I now feel in my bones, ‘the state of things as they actually exist’, without social filters or unsustainable stories blocking the way’. e19 reality touches upon 7 topics: our perception of reality, the possibility of human extinction, ecological anxiety and ecological grief, hope, arts, storytelling and the wisdom of indigenous cultures. The rest of season 2 features interviews with thought leaders about their responses and reactions to e19 reality.

my professional services

I’ve been retired from the Canada Council for the Arts since September 15, 2020 where I served as a senior strategic advisor in arts granting (2016-2020) and manager of the Inter-Arts Office (1999-2015). My focus in (quasi) retirement is environmental issues within my area of expertise in arts and culture, in particular in acoustic ecology. I’m open to become involved in projects that align with my values and that move forward environmental concerns. Feel free to email me for a conversation : claude@conscient.ca

acknowledgement of eco-responsibility

I acknowledge that the production of the conscient podcast / balado conscient produces carbon. I try to minimize this carbon footprint by being as efficient as possible, including using GreenGeeks as my web server and acquiring carbon offsets for my equipment and travel activities from BullFrog Power and Less.

a word about privilege and bias

While recording episode 19 ‘reality’, I heard elements of ‘privilege’ in my voice that I had not noticed before. It sounded a bit like ‘ecological mansplaining’. I realize that, in spite of good intentions, I need to work my way through issues of privilege (of all kinds) and unconscious bias the way I did through ecological anxiety and grief during the fall of 2020. My re-education is ongoing.

Go to conscient.ca

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Member Spotlight: Beverly Naidus

This week we recognize the work of artist Beverly Naidus.

EXTREME MAKEOVER: Reimagining the Port of Tacoma Free of Fossil Fuels is a community-based art project. The Port of Tacoma is an industrial port built on tribal land in violation of the Medicine Creek Treaty of 1854. The soil and water have been contaminated by years of dumping and now host several designated superfund sites. In recent years, the community has been fighting the installation of new and dangerous fossil fuel projects in the Port and Extreme Makeover arose out of that resistance.

MAP OF THE 3-MILE BLAST ZONE (CREATED BY THE PUYALLUP TRIBE)

“Extreme Makeover has been hosting art workshops (most recently with the support of Tacoma’s 350.org) to engage the public in a reconstructive visioning process. The questions we ask participants are: what would the Port of Tacoma look like if the toxic superfund sites are healed as much as possible via permaculture design and the port becomes a showcase for green, renewable energy? What would happen if the Puyallup Nation’s vision for a restored estuary is made tangible through multidisciplinary art projects so that the public will get behind it? How can this project help the community prepare, both emotionally and pragmatically, for the impact of rising sea levels on the Port of Tacoma and the local ecosystem?” 

“After some meditation exercises, participants make collages, digital images and drawings as part of their visioning process. Our art making can be powerful medicine. It can awaken people to their power and motivate them to take action. It can be the glue that brings together strangers when they sit in workshops making art together. Participants have come to various public locations and community centers to discuss the questions above and create images that will be eventually projected onto walls in their neighborhoods, captured on social media, and shared virally.”

“Scientists, activists, artists, and members of the Puyallup tribe have been developing performance interventions for different public events. Those events will eventually be videotaped and shared online. The goal will be to awaken a typically uninformed citizenry and help them become stakeholders in their shared future. 

We want to reach people who have given up hope and have succumbed to dystopic views of the future. This is an intergenerational project so that stories about getting through hardship, healing from trauma, and recovering from depression and difficult circumstances will help younger participants believe that we can shift things.”

Beverly Naidus’s art and life have straddled the art world’s socially engaged margins, artful activism collaborations, and community-based art projects. Much of her work deals with ecological and social issues that have adversely affected her and those around her. Naidus has taught art as a subversive activity at NYC museums, the Institute for Social Ecology, California State University, Long Beach, where she had tenure, Goddard College, Hampshire College, and Carleton College. She’s been a tenured member of the UW Tacoma faculty for the past 16 + years, where she’s shaped an innovative, interdisciplinary studio arts curriculum in art for social change and healing. She is the author of Arts for Change: Teaching Outside the Frame (a book that is shifting studio arts curriculum around the world) and has written & published many essays on eco-art and social practice, as well as a few works of speculative fiction. She recently published a limited-edition artist’s book, Not Just Words: A 30-Year Exhortation to Love & Resistance. faculty.washington.edu/bnaidus

Featured Images: ©Beverly Naidus, EXTREME MAKEOVER: Reimagining the Port of Tacoma Free of Fossil Fuels, 2018-2020.

———-

ecoartapace was conceived in 1997 by Patricia Watts in Los Angeles. In 1999, Watts partnered with east coast curator Amy Lipton, operating as a nonprofit under the umbrella of SEE, the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs in California. 2019 marked twenty years that Watts and Lipton have curated art and ecology programs, participating on panels and giving lectures internationally. Combined, they have curated over sixty art and ecology exhibitions, many outdoors in collaboration with artists creating site-specific works. They have worked with over one thousand artists from across the United States, and some internationally. Starting 2020, ecoartspace became an LLC membership organization based out of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Conscient Podcast: e79 manifesto – accelerating climate action through the power of arts, culture and heritage

e79 is my #conscientpodcast reading of the ‘Accelerating Climate Action through the Power of Arts, Culture and Heritage’ manifesto developed by the Climate Heritage Network to summarize key cultural messages for COP26 and activate the arts, culture and heritage sector. You can find more information on the origins and the co-authors of the manifesto at cultureatcop.com. 

It’s Monday, November 8, 2021. I’m on a beach in Stanley Park, in Vancouver and this is an episode where I will read to you a manifesto. A very good one and a very timely one.

Here’s the story… I first met archeologist and museums champion Dr. Robert R. Janes through the Sectoral Arts Climate leadership for the Emergency (SCALE) where he spoke about some of his climate projects, including the Coalition of Museums for Climate Justice. We’ve kept in touch. A few weeks ago, Bob sent me a link to a manifesto called ‘Accelerating Climate Action through the Power of Arts, Culture and Heritage’ developed by the Climate Heritage Network . I had not heard about it and maybe you have not as well. So I wanted to read it to you. 

I was deeply moved by the clarity and power of these words. 

So I asked for, and was granted, permission by the co-authors to record the manifesto for this podcast in both English and in the next episode 80, je vais le lire en francais. One of the reason for a recorded version of this manifesto is that you might be like me and tend to retain information more when I listen rather than when I read and so I wanted to share an audio version of this manifesto available to the listeners of this podcast during COP26. I will read out the manifesto’s introduction followed by the manifesto in its entirety. In keeping with how I have been doing the podcast this season this will be in one take with no editing so please forgive any mistakes.

You can find more information on the origins and the co-authors of the manifesto at cultureatcop.com. I would to thank Bob and the other co- authors of the manifesto for this gift and for this invigorating wake up call. 

Here is the introduction that you’ll find on the website.

‘This Manifesto provides key messages on culture and climate change aimed at the 2021 United Nations Climate Conference (COP26) and beyond. It seeks to activate those involved in arts, culture, and heritage to take climate action through communication and engagement, inspiring and assisting their constituents, members and audiences to increase ambition; to change their own behaviours; and to engage with climate change policy development at local and national government and intergovernmental level.  Simultaneously, in order to meet the urgency of the climate emergency, it strives to inspire and encourage greater synergistic collaboration on climate action with other sectors and partners that have not traditionally engaged with cultural actors. We invite civil society, government at all levels, Indigenous Peoples’ organisations, cultural organizations and institutions, businesses, universities and research organisations and other stakeholders to join us in signing on to this Manifesto, signalling our shared ambition to create just, thriving, and resilient communities today and into the future.’

Now here is the manifesto:

Accelerating Climate Action through the Power of Arts, Culture and Heritage

A Manifesto on Keeping 1.5° Alive

COP26

We, the undersigned, declare that people, their cultures, and the natural and cultural heritage of the earth are profoundly at risk from human-caused climate change and the climate inaction that is deepening the unfolding climate crisis even while we reaffirm the immense power of arts, culture, and heritage to inspire climate action and enable a just transition to low carbon, climate resilient futures.

Climate change is already impacting people and planet, with long-lasting and irreversible effects. Avoiding the worst of these requires limiting global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees above pre-industrial levels. Yet the world is failing to meet even the Paris Agreement’s 2 degrees temperature goal, with current Green House Gas (GHG) concentrations now the highest ever recorded.

The present COVID-19 pandemic, and the suffering it has caused, have made the response to climate change even more difficult while also revealing essential lessons, including the imperative of heeding science, the consequences of the separation between humans and nature, the importance of centering the needs of the most vulnerable, and the fact that rapid and far-reaching social and economic change ispossible when society, working together, wills it.

Building back better, tackling the climate and biodiversity crises, and achieving sustainable development requires ambitious, transformative action at scale, including deep GHG emissions reductions in all sectors, a wide portfolio of mitigation and adaptation options and a significant upscaling of investments in those options.

Centering equity and justice should be at the heart of all actions so that widening economic and health disparities can be reversed. Culture and the arts reflect and influence consumption patterns, mediating our awareness of nature and the planet and our relationship to the environment.

Culture anchors people to places and to each other. It can create cohesion in ways that enable community-building and collective action. Artists and cultural voices drive public awareness and action; their work can be a powerful tool for climate mobilization. Through public accessibility and trust, cultural institutions like museums and libraries provide platforms for listening to communities and hubs of multicultural and inter-generational exchange, capacity building, and knowledge-sharing.

Integrating natural and cultural values highlights linkages between the ecological and social functions of landscapes in ways that promote lifestyles in harmony with nature. This historic environment embodies past carbon investments, now stewarded by the owners and users of landscapes and buildings. Cultural heritage holds peoples’ stories and the knowledge of local communities (what the Paris Agreement calls ‘endogenous technologies’). The archaeological record illustrates the causes of, and adaptation to, past changes.

Yet, the talents of many arts, culture and heritage actors, operators and advocates have still not been mobilised for climate action. They include artists, anthropologists, archaeologists, architects, landscape architects, administrators, archivists, crafts persons, conservators, curators, engineers, geographers, historians, librarians, musicians, museologists, writers, performers, urban planners, and site managers, as well as scientists, researchers, teachers, and scholars, and carriers of Indigenous knowledge, whose unique insights have not yet been adequately applied to climate change or accounted for in climate science.

We represent institutions and organizations committed to shifting this paradigm and unlocking the potential of arts, culture, and heritage to achieve the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. We recognize this must include transformation within the culture sector too, embracing sustainable practices and stewardship; lifting up the voices of underserved communities and prioritizing solidarity with frontline communities, as well as preserving, recording and making culture and heritage available in inclusive ways, including through traditional and innovative artistic forms as well as new technologies.

This paradigm and mindset shift also require the cultural dimensions of climate action be prioritized in science, policy, planning and fiscal frameworks for climate mitigation and adaption, disaster risk reduction and in planning for losses and damages. The mainstreaming of cultural considerations must be done at all scales (local, regional, national and international) and across all sectors from energy to buildings, frommobility to agriculture.

We recognize the profound connection between cultural rights, cultural survival, and climate action. We also consider this Manifesto to be a contribution to human-centered, rights-based approaches that places culture as an explicit and operational dimension of development and provides cultural actors (civil society and institutional) a seat at the table required to make it happen.

It is time to act. 

We must close both the emissions and ambition gaps. To achieve a 1.5°Celsius world, more attention must be paid to the cultural dimensions of lifestyles and livelihoods, to the public understanding of climate impacts, the social acceptance of systems changes, to gender-responsive and diverse approaches, and tothe wellsprings of climate ambition. In short, we must transcend the divides between culture and science, people and policy, memory and evolving practice.

COP26 must be a turning point for multi-level action to realize the potential of culture to effectively combat the climate crisis. It is our shared responsibility to secure the cultural inheritance and cultural rights of current and future generations; to safeguard a healthy, prosperous, and resilient planet; and to deliver the emissions reductions upon which these outcomes hinge. In all this work, count us in! Count culture in!

Me at Stanley Park beach, Vancouver, November 8, 2021
The post e79 manifesto – accelerating climate action through the power of arts, culture and heritage appeared first on conscient podcast / balado conscient. conscient is a bilingual blog and podcast (French or English) by audio artist Claude Schryer that explores how arts and culture contribute to environmental awareness and action.

———-

About the Concient Podcast from Claude Schryer

The conscient podcast / balado conscient is a series of conversations about art, conscience and the ecological crisis. This podcast is bilingual (in either English or French). The language of the guest determines the language of the podcast. Episode notes are translated but not individual interviews.

I started the conscient project in 2020 as a personal learning journey and knowledge sharing exercise. It has been rewarding, and sometimes surprising.

The term ‘conscient’ is defined as ‘being aware of one’s surroundings, thoughts and motivations’. My touchstone for the podcast is episode 1, e01 terrified, based on an essay I wrote in May 2019, where I share my anxiety about the climate crisis and my belief that arts and culture can play a critical role in raising public awareness about environmental issues. The conscient podcast / balado conscient follows up on my http://simplesoundscapes.ca (2016–2019) project: 175, 3-minute audio and video field recordings that explore mindful listening.

Season 1 (May to October 2020) explored how the arts contribute to environmental awareness and action. I produced 3 episodes in French and 15 in English. The episodes cover a wide range of content, including activism, impact measurement, gaming, arts funding, cross-sectoral collaborations, social justice, artistic practices, etc. Episodes 8 to 17 were recorded while I was at the Creative Climate Leadership USA course in Arizona in March 2020 (led by Julie’s Bicycle). Episode 18 is a compilation of highlights from these conversations.

Season 2 (March 2021 – ) explores the concept of reality and is about accepting reality, working through ecological grief and charting a path forward. The first episode of season 2 (e19 reality) mixes quotations from 28 authors with field recordings from simplesoundscapes and from my 1998 soundscape composition, Au dernier vivant les biens. One of my findings from this episode is that ‘I now see, and more importantly, I now feel in my bones, ‘the state of things as they actually exist’, without social filters or unsustainable stories blocking the way’. e19 reality touches upon 7 topics: our perception of reality, the possibility of human extinction, ecological anxiety and ecological grief, hope, arts, storytelling and the wisdom of indigenous cultures. The rest of season 2 features interviews with thought leaders about their responses and reactions to e19 reality.

my professional services

I’ve been retired from the Canada Council for the Arts since September 15, 2020 where I served as a senior strategic advisor in arts granting (2016-2020) and manager of the Inter-Arts Office (1999-2015). My focus in (quasi) retirement is environmental issues within my area of expertise in arts and culture, in particular in acoustic ecology. I’m open to become involved in projects that align with my values and that move forward environmental concerns. Feel free to email me for a conversation : claude@conscient.ca

acknowledgement of eco-responsibility

I acknowledge that the production of the conscient podcast / balado conscient produces carbon. I try to minimize this carbon footprint by being as efficient as possible, including using GreenGeeks as my web server and acquiring carbon offsets for my equipment and travel activities from BullFrog Power and Less.

a word about privilege and bias

While recording episode 19 ‘reality’, I heard elements of ‘privilege’ in my voice that I had not noticed before. It sounded a bit like ‘ecological mansplaining’. I realize that, in spite of good intentions, I need to work my way through issues of privilege (of all kinds) and unconscious bias the way I did through ecological anxiety and grief during the fall of 2020. My re-education is ongoing.

Go to conscient.ca

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Wild Authors: Premee Mohamed

By Mary Woodbury

This month we travel virtually to Alberta, the home of Indo-Caribbean scientist and speculative fiction author Premee Mohamed, and also where her novella, The Annual Migration of Clouds (ECW Press, September 2021), takes place. I admit to being drawn to this book because I often search for fiction about fungi, and Premee’s novella has some of that, along with a glimpse into the future if we continue on the route we’re on. I was so happy to be able to talk with her about her book. You can find more about Premee at her website and on Twitter. Waubgeshig Rice, another favorite Canadian author (Moon of the Crusted Snow), said of Clouds: “A riveting look at a dire future. The climate crisis is real, and The Annual Migration of Clouds is a must-read fiction.”

ABOUT THE BOOK

From ECW Press

The world is nothing like it once was: climate disasters have wracked the continent, causing food shortages, ending industry, and leaving little behind. Then came Cad, mysterious mind-altering fungi that invade the bodies of the now scattered citizenry. Reid, a young woman who carries this parasite, has been given a chance to get away – to move to one of the last remnants of pre-disaster society – but she can’t bring herself to abandon her mother and the community that relies on her. When she’s offered a coveted place on a dangerous and profitable mission, she jumps at the opportunity to set her family up for life, but how can Reid ask people to put their trust in her when she can’t even trust her own mind?

I found the novella unique and refreshing, written with wit and in the style of a lyrical polemic.

A CHAT WITH THE AUTHOR

I see that you are in Alberta, Canada so hello from Nova Scotia! How did you get started in writing, and did you have any favorite childhood memories of nature and/or fiction about environmental issues?

I’ve always written as a hobby. I think the earliest “book” I wrote was when I was eight or nine, using drafting supplies from my dad’s job (super-smelly alcohol markers, letraset text, etc.). I didn’t decide to get into publishing until a few years ago because I didn’t see the point of monetizing my hobby, but a friend talked me into starting with short fiction, which pays right away, and from then I started to get the idea of trying to publish longer form work. As a child, my favorite nature memories were playing in the forests around my house near the Sturgeon river; I’m sad that that area is being filled up with McMansions now. I loved Watership Down and The Wind in the Willows because they were about a nature that didn’t include humans, but I wasn’t very interested in reading about environmental issues back then. I knew from the news, from school, and from our family subscription to National Geographic that everything was in decline and the decline was accelerating, and I felt so sad about it and, unable to deal with the sadness, my response was just to try not think about it, even though it was everywhere.

What motivated you to write The Annual Migration of Clouds?

I guess I’m just one of those writers who chases an idea to completion when it comes across my head! I liked the combination of the disease and the “quiet disaster” setting. Books that are set just after disasters, or I guess post-apocalyptic fiction, are great, but that wasn’t what I wanted to write. I wanted to write about how boring and tedious and essential it is to rebuild after disaster, when the worst is generally over, and how people might do it differently based on these new constraints.

Can you give new writers a tip about world-building?

World-building doesn’t have to make perfect logical sense for our world, but it does have to make sense inside the internal logic of the story, or else readers will pick up on it right away!

Thanks for the tip! So what’s going on in the story?

In The Annual Migration of Clouds, a young woman named Reid lives and works at a university campus in Edmonton that is no longer a university, just a sturdy place to which people retreated after numerous climate disasters caused the collapse of technological society decades ago. She’s also infected with a new incurable disease that makes her constantly on edge about whether she’s doing or thinking things or whether it’s the disease doing it – and so is her mother. When she gets a rare chance to study at one of the few remnants of pre-collapse society, at a university far in the mountains, she has to choose between leaving her mother and community or staying with them to help rebuild and work towards a better future.

One of the descriptions I’ve read called your novella “hopepunk,” which is a pretty new genre. It seems a lot of readers are calling for more positivity in apocalyptic climate stories. What are your thoughts on that?

I also saw that descriptor! (I would also like to add that I didn’t put it in my description of the novella, because I wasn’t entirely sure what it meant.) I do think I would like to see more hopeful post-apocalyptic (or, like this one, post-post-apocalyptic) stories. I have read a lot, like a lot a lot a lot, of hopeless dystopias and disasters scenarios, ones that assume that the worst of human nature will take over and that will be a permanent condition – that we’ll always be scratching out a subsistence living after a disaster, that everyone will become insular, territorial, and homicidal about resources and labour, that we’ll all become monsters. (I’m thinking things like Threads here.) Even just in terms of variety, I would like to see a body of literature that’s slightly hopeful, because I do think that fiction has the power to help introduce new ideas into people’s minds. If they don’t stick, that’s okay; just introducing a wide variety of possibilities is enough, especially when I hear people saying now “What’s the point, why bother? There’s nothing we can do about various issues.”

In times of COVID, everyone in the world is now dealing with disease on a scale that most of us have not seen before. Clouds has a disease, a fungus, also a symbiont, however. What led you to write Cad (the disease) into the story?

Actually, I started with the disease first! I had an idea for a hereditary symbiont disease (which Cad is), and I fell pretty far down the rabbit hole of thinking about transmission, how it would affect people’s minds, their decisions to have children (or not), how people would be pinning their hopes on accurate tests so they could avoid it, how people didn’t know how to not catch it, where it came from, etc. – before thinking, “Well, with today’s technology, why wouldn’t we just cure it? That would be priority #1 if a disease like this – debilitating, painful, fatal, and equally able to affect all populations – came up.” (I should also add that I wrote this in 2019.) So the next idea was actually, “Well, what if we couldn’t.” That led to me setting the story in a future where we had lost the ability to do advanced research and medicine, rather than in the past. And there’s no future I could imagine without climate change, so the two got intertwined together: a plague making people less able to respond to climate change disasters, and the disasters making people less able to respond to the plague. In Reid and her community is where everything kind of shakes out, sixty or seventy years later.

I had that kind of thought too, when COVID-19 was announced as a pandemic, that we would all have been better at curing something right now. Is there anything else that you wanted to add?

Nothing else to add! Just that I hope people enjoy the book.

This article is part of our Wild Authors series. It was originally published on Dragonfly.eco.

______________________________

Mary Woodbury, a graduate of Purdue University, runs Dragonfly.eco, a site that explores ecology in literature, including works about climate change. She writes fiction under pen name Clara Hume. Her novel Back to the Garden has been discussed in Dissent Magazine, Ethnobiology for the Future: Linking Cultural and Ecological Diversity (University of Arizona Press), and Uncertainty and the Philosophy of Climate Change (Routledge). Mary lives in Nova Scotia and enjoys hiking, writing, and reading.

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Member Spotlight: Mark Brest van Kempen

This week we recognize the work of artist Mark Brest van Kempen.

Brest van Kempen has created a variety of artworks using the landscape itself as sculptural material. From the Free Speech Monument on the UC Berkeley campus to Land Exchange at the National Academy of Art in China, his work explores the range of emotions and issues that are embodied in our complex relationship to the environment. He has spoken around the country and abroad on the possibilities of creating artwork that functions outside the museum /gallery context and that bring aesthetic and symbolic meaning to everyday situations.

Living From Land

“This thirty day performance consisted of living within a five square mile area of wilderness and bringing no food with me. I ate only the plants and animals from the site. The project was an inversion of landscape painting that reoriented the artist’s relationship with land. Instead of standing outside of the landscape and taking it in with my eyes, I stood inside it and took it in with my mouth. The performance was documented in a video installation that was exhibited at the Richmond Art Center and the Armory Center for the Arts in California and Exit Art in New York.”

Ravenna Creek Drop

“This project sculpts the land and city infrastructure itself in a mile-long artwork that traces Ravenna Creek as it flows under the streets and sidewalks of Seattle. The project has a number of components along the corridor that includes a blue line that traces where the creek flows in a pipe under the city. Text of cast aluminum spelling out “Ravenna Creek” is embedded in the sidewalk along the line, creating a life-sized map embedded in the landscape itself. This maps traces where the creek flows underground. Pedestrians can follow the path of the creek from Ravenna Park to Lake Washington. 

The daylighted section of Ravenna Creek ends in a small pond before flowing to a pipe under the city. I designed a steel and glass sculptural outfall that creates an 11 foot long wedge-shaped void in the water as the creek disappears into the city’s infrastructure. Two sides are blue, visually connecting the water with the blue line described above. The other two sides are glass and reveal a cross section of the pond bed.

Three Viewing vaults located along the pipeline allow pedestrians to see the creek flowing eight feet beneath the city.  This subterranean creek is lit and complete with boulders and ferns.

Fifteen plaques mark the locations of glass capsules buried beneath the sidewalk. Each capsule contains seeds of a plant found on the site before the city was built. The capsules are designed to break and scatter the seeds during any future construction projects.”

Leona Quarry Earthwork

“This large scale, multi-faceted project brings together land art with community activism, environmental art and land use on a one hundred fifty-acre urban riparian site. After documenting numerous violations of local and federal clean water laws on the site of a large new development, I worked with a small group of community activists to sue the developer and the city in federal court. This lawsuit resulted in altering the design of their developments to protect the watershed. I see this endeavor as a large-scale earthwork that was the result of a political struggle played out on the landscape. 

Several interventions in the landscape frame the site as a large-scale artwork including legal text from the lawsuit stenciled onto drainage channels. The text continues in pipes underground and extends beneath the development itself. Several sites have become habitat for animals such as Pacific Tree Frogs, Western Fence Lizards and the endangered Alameda Whipsnake. Also, the creek itself was temporarily sculpted into a large inverted fountain that alters its legal standing from ‘groundwater’ to ‘creek’.”

Mark Brest van Kempen has received numerous commissions for public art projects including the San Francisco Art Commission, the City of San Jose, the City of Seattle and the Haas Foundation. His work has been presented in several books including Lucy Lippard’s The Lure of the Local and Peter Selz’s Art of Engagement as well as Time Magazine, The New York Times, Art in America, and the LA Times. He has received a California Arts Council Fellowship and has taught at the San Francisco Art Institute, Stanford University and California College of the Arts. mbvkstudio.com

Featured Images: ©Mark Brest van Kempen, Living From Land; Ravenna Creek Drop; Leona Quarry Earthwork 

Above: Mark Brest van Kempen, image courtesy of San Francisco Art Institute

———-

ecoartapace was conceived in 1997 by Patricia Watts in Los Angeles. In 1999, Watts partnered with east coast curator Amy Lipton, operating as a nonprofit under the umbrella of SEE, the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs in California. 2019 marked twenty years that Watts and Lipton have curated art and ecology programs, participating on panels and giving lectures internationally. Combined, they have curated over sixty art and ecology exhibitions, many outdoors in collaboration with artists creating site-specific works. They have worked with over one thousand artists from across the United States, and some internationally. Starting 2020, ecoartspace became an LLC membership organization based out of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Conscient Podcast: e78 milena droumeva – art needs to get on the street

e78 is my #conscientpodcast conversation with acoustic ecology colleague Dr. Milena Droumeva on November 3, 2021 in Vancouver about multiple points of ‘listening’, thoughts about radicality, that imagination can lead to crafting things that we will actually need for survival and how to address profound disconnections. 

Note: There is a slight flame rumble in the background but the voice is clear :-)  

Milena Droumeva is an Associate Professor and Glenfraser Endowed Professor in Sound Studies at Simon Fraser University specializing in mobile media, sound studies, gender, and sensory ethnography. They have worked extensively in educational research on game-based learning and computational literacy, formerly as a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Research on Digital Learning at York University. Milena has a background in acoustic ecology and works across the fields of urban soundscape research, sonification for public engagement, as well as gender and sound in video games. Current research projects include sound ethnographies of the city (livable soundscapes), mobile curation, critical soundmapping, and sensory ethnography. Check out Milena’s Story Map, “Soundscapes of Productivity” about coffee shop soundscapes as the office ambience of the creative economy freelance workers and the Livable Soundscapes project. 

Fireplace where we recorded this episode on November 3, 2021 in Vancouver

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(traduction)

e78 est ma conversation #baladoconscient avec ma collègue en écologie sonore, Dr. Milena Droumeva, le 3 novembre 2021 à Vancouver, sur les multiples points d'"écoute", ses réflexions sur la radicalité, sur le fait que l'imagination peut conduire à la création de choses dont nous aurons réellement besoin pour survivre, ainsi que sur la manière d'aborder nos déconnexions profondes.  

Note : Il y a un léger grondement de flame en arrière-plan mais la voix est claire :-)  

Milena Droumeva est professeure agrégée et titulaire de la chaire Glenfraser en études sonores à l’université Simon Fraser, spécialisée dans les médias mobiles, les études sonores, le genre et l’ethnographie sensorielle. Elle a beaucoup travaillé dans le domaine de la recherche éducative sur l’apprentissage par le jeu et l’alphabétisation informatique, notamment en tant que boursière postdoctorale à l’Institute for Research on Digital Learning de l’Université York. Milena a une formation en écologie acoustique et travaille dans les domaines de la recherche sur les paysages sonores urbains, de la sonification pour l’engagement public, ainsi que du genre et du son dans les jeux vidéo. Ses projets de recherche actuels comprennent les ethnographies sonores de la ville (paysages sonores habitables), la conservation mobile, la cartographie sonore critique et l’ethnographie sensorielle. Consultez le Story Map de Milena, “Soundscapes of Productivity” sur les ambiances sonores des cafés comme ambiance de bureau des travailleurs indépendants de l’économie créative et le projet Livable Soundscapes.

Extrait

Je pense que l’art doit descendre dans la rue, car sensibiliser les gens dans une galerie, c’est vraiment s’adresser à ceux qui sont déjà convaincu. Je vais laisser de côté la notion de sensibilisation, car nous sommes tous deux d’accord pour dire que le temps pour cela est passé, mais je pense que l’art doit revenir à l’artisanat, dans le sens où l’imagination peut conduire à la fabrication de choses dont nous aurons réellement besoin pour survivre. Je pense que – et encore une fois, c’est mon opinion radicale – je pense que l’une des raisons pour lesquelles nous voyons ces quantités sans précédent d’anxiété et même ce nouveau terme “anxiété climatique” que nous avons, qui est probablement sur le point d’être défini comme une sorte de condition de santé mentale, est parce que nous sommes si profondément déconnectés de nos propres moyens d’existence.

The post e78 milena droumeva – art needs to get on the street appeared first on conscient podcast / balado conscient. conscient is a bilingual blog and podcast (French or English) by audio artist Claude Schryer that explores how arts and culture contribute to environmental awareness and action.

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About the Concient Podcast from Claude Schryer

The conscient podcast / balado conscient is a series of conversations about art, conscience and the ecological crisis. This podcast is bilingual (in either English or French). The language of the guest determines the language of the podcast. Episode notes are translated but not individual interviews.

I started the conscient project in 2020 as a personal learning journey and knowledge sharing exercise. It has been rewarding, and sometimes surprising.

The term ‘conscient’ is defined as ‘being aware of one’s surroundings, thoughts and motivations’. My touchstone for the podcast is episode 1, e01 terrified, based on an essay I wrote in May 2019, where I share my anxiety about the climate crisis and my belief that arts and culture can play a critical role in raising public awareness about environmental issues. The conscient podcast / balado conscient follows up on my http://simplesoundscapes.ca (2016–2019) project: 175, 3-minute audio and video field recordings that explore mindful listening.

Season 1 (May to October 2020) explored how the arts contribute to environmental awareness and action. I produced 3 episodes in French and 15 in English. The episodes cover a wide range of content, including activism, impact measurement, gaming, arts funding, cross-sectoral collaborations, social justice, artistic practices, etc. Episodes 8 to 17 were recorded while I was at the Creative Climate Leadership USA course in Arizona in March 2020 (led by Julie’s Bicycle). Episode 18 is a compilation of highlights from these conversations.

Season 2 (March 2021 – ) explores the concept of reality and is about accepting reality, working through ecological grief and charting a path forward. The first episode of season 2 (e19 reality) mixes quotations from 28 authors with field recordings from simplesoundscapes and from my 1998 soundscape composition, Au dernier vivant les biens. One of my findings from this episode is that ‘I now see, and more importantly, I now feel in my bones, ‘the state of things as they actually exist’, without social filters or unsustainable stories blocking the way’. e19 reality touches upon 7 topics: our perception of reality, the possibility of human extinction, ecological anxiety and ecological grief, hope, arts, storytelling and the wisdom of indigenous cultures. The rest of season 2 features interviews with thought leaders about their responses and reactions to e19 reality.

my professional services

I’ve been retired from the Canada Council for the Arts since September 15, 2020 where I served as a senior strategic advisor in arts granting (2016-2020) and manager of the Inter-Arts Office (1999-2015). My focus in (quasi) retirement is environmental issues within my area of expertise in arts and culture, in particular in acoustic ecology. I’m open to become involved in projects that align with my values and that move forward environmental concerns. Feel free to email me for a conversation : claude@conscient.ca

acknowledgement of eco-responsibility

I acknowledge that the production of the conscient podcast / balado conscient produces carbon. I try to minimize this carbon footprint by being as efficient as possible, including using GreenGeeks as my web server and acquiring carbon offsets for my equipment and travel activities from BullFrog Power and Less.

a word about privilege and bias

While recording episode 19 ‘reality’, I heard elements of ‘privilege’ in my voice that I had not noticed before. It sounded a bit like ‘ecological mansplaining’. I realize that, in spite of good intentions, I need to work my way through issues of privilege (of all kinds) and unconscious bias the way I did through ecological anxiety and grief during the fall of 2020. My re-education is ongoing.

Go to conscient.ca

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An Interview with Writer Marjorie B. Kellogg

By Amy Brady

I’m writing this as a nor’easter batters New York, New Jersey, and our home in New England, and as the Western US experiences record rainfall after prolonged drought. According to the NY Times, these weather patterns, especially those out west, are a “glimpse into the future,” a future brought about by the climate crisis.

As recently as just a few years ago, important media outlets like the Times weren’t making explicit connections between climate change and extreme weather events. Like you I’m sure, I’m thrilled to see these connections finally being made. But there is still so much work to be done in this area. 

As news outlets ramp up their climate coverage (or, at least, I hope they will), artists and writers of all kinds continue to cover the climate crisis, encouraging readers and viewers to consider the complexity of the problem and the variety of impacts experienced around the world. One such writer is Marjorie B. Kellogg, author of Glimmer, a novel about a climate-ravaged New York City.

Marjorie has been writing about the climate crisis for some time in her fiction. She’s also the editor of The New Franklin Register and an award-winning scenery designer for theater on Broadway and Off-Broadway. She taught at Princeton and Columbia and was Associate Professor of Theater at Colgate University from 1995 to 2017. In our interview below, we discuss her latest novel, how she’s seen climate change manifest in her own life, and the role she sees fiction (and all kinds of art) playing in our larger discourse on climate.

Glimmer is a compelling character, who’s driven by survival and a sense of loss. Please tell us where she comes from! Who or what inspired her?

Basically, a who AND a what. The ‘what’ was a technical need: writing about a time that hasn’t happened (quite) yet requires a good deal of backstory and world-building, so that the reader can settle into an unfamiliar future with confidence, not constantly having to ask, “What’s going on and where am I?” But exposition can be static, badly disrupting the narrative flow. I wanted the characters to provide the necessary information through action and dialogue. Thus, Glimmer’s memory loss: if my protagonist can’t remember how the world got to the way it is as the story begins, the people around her must fill in by remembering it for her, gradually and as needed.

Later, as Glimmer regains her past bit by bit, her recollections become much more personal, but by then we have learned the world well enough to fit the personal into the more general Big Picture of flooded Manhattan 2110. But losing your past dislocates your sense of self as well as your place in the world. It leaves you vulnerable to missteps and misunderstandings, some perhaps comical but also potentially fatal. It’s a kind of disability.

I grew up with a handicapped sister. Her disability was not just an obstacle, but a constant source of threat and stress in her life, a physical and emotional vulnerability. Yet she had great stamina and determination. She was both sweet and deeply stubborn, and this combination of strength and vulnerability seemed exactly right for Glimmer as she manages to survive despite the odds.

What inspired you to write about the effects of climate change? Do you see the crisis manifesting in your own life? 

Speaking of vulnerability, I have always been painfully aware of how vulnerable our planet is, perhaps due to reading science fiction from an early age, much of which does focus on humanity’s destructive treatment of the Earth. Even so, anyone who fails to see climate change happening is living under a rock!

Meanwhile, I am fortunate to live in a (so far) blessed place. Here in upstate New York, we have clean air and abundant water, few tornadoes, baby earthquakes, no volcanoes. When hurricanes rage up the coast, we might suffer local flooding but nothing like New Orleans or even New York City. A dry month brings caution and burn bans, but no unquenchable wildfires. We water our gardens without guilt.

Yet, as a gardener, I sense the changes, which is more disturbing than just reading about them. The long falls without a frost, the warmer winters, the earlier springs. The birds that stick around longer, perhaps even winter over. The reduction in their numbers. The steady infiltration of invasive plants and toxic insects from more southerly climate zones. I can grow plants here now that would never have survived the winters of twenty years ago. Often I joke that global warming is my friend. But it’s only a temporary advantage. What it suggests for our future, here and everywhere, is terrifying. That I can see it proves it’s happening way too fast.

Of course, weather is a constant factor in rural life, not just something that happens when you go outside. It can determine the course of a day, a week, a season, or an income. It can be a source of great beauty, of sensual pleasure, even drama.  As such, it’s always had a central place in my fiction. Like a human character, it can be the hero or the villain. My fantasy work, The Dragon Quartet, features dragons born of the four natural elements, Earth, Water, Fire, and Air. My novel Lear’s Daughters, conceived with the scientific support of NASA climate scientist William Rossow, involves using weather as a weapon. (Also terrifying… but a lot of fun!)

Your book makes harrowing connections between dwindling resources and the threat of violent conflict. What do you hope readers take away from these connections?

I hope they will take a longer view and reconsider their actions in the world.  I hope they will see that this is a shared, global crisis – societal as well as climatological – and that the only way for humanity to survive (if indeed we deserve to survive!) is to work together to reverse or, at best, limit climate change. If we do nothing, we’ll be fighting over the ruins. That much is not fiction. Too many people and too few resources equal war. It’s already the root cause of local conflicts all around the globe.

And because parts of the world will fare differently from the effects of climate change, the dichotomy of have and have-not will only deepen. We see it happening in this country already, with the Gulf Coast hurricanes or the western wildfires and water disputes. People forced to flee the hard-hit areas will become climate refugees desperate to move into places where the more fortunate do not want them and will fight not to share what they consider theirs by right.

But this might-makes-right scenario has no happy ending. I don’t claim the wisdom to provide a specific solution, but by bringing a scary but realistically conceived near-future to life in a fictional narrative, I hope to move readers to consider this crisis deeply, to take it on as their own, to take action to prevent that dire future from becoming a reality, while we still have the opportunity to do so.

I love that the people who stay behind in your version of a future climate-ravaged NYC are the people who are already rethinking how to live on Earth: the outsiders, the artists, the people who, because of any number of hardships, have had to scrape and scrap to get by. Do you think that more people should be thinking about different ways of living, of structuring our societies? 

Yes, please! The more we think, the more chance of finding a way out of this!  We need to do Darwin one better and redefine what it means to be ‘fittest.’

Like living creatures, societies evolve over time as they adapt to changing geographical and climatological conditions. In the past, except during cataclysmic events, these changes tended to come slowly enough for most organisms to keep up. But the pace of anthropogenic climate change may be too rapid for humans (or life in general) to adapt in time, especially if we continue to keep our heads in the sand and refuse to recognize how badly we’ve screwed up the natural systems that sustain us.

Still, there’s always a vanguard, often made up of people who have declined a stake in the status quo or have had it taken away from them – yes, outsiders, artists, idealists, visionaries. Conventional society sees such people as a danger, yet they have often been its saviors simply by being willing (or forced) to try something new. 

And I think a lot of young people today are out there in front trying to figure out how we can live on this Earth and not destroy it. They see that the status quo is not working, and that only by sustaining the planet will we be able to sustain ourselves.

What role do you think novels do or can play in the wider discourse on climate?

Not everyone keeps up with the news, or reads non-fiction or the environmental press, especially younger folk busy with getting their lives going or raising kids. They are stressed and exhausted, and want to relax. If a novel (or art in general) can entertain as well as inform and enlighten, it stands a better chance of raising the more… shall we say, resistant or reluctant consciousness to a greater awareness of climate change, its reality, its coming consequences. Climate fiction can be a kind of recruitment device, rousing forces for the battle against climate change.

A story can draw in a reader with sympathetic characters that he/she can identify with. The flood or drought or famine is no longer some distant problem, but one the reader has shared with the characters living through it. Good reporting can do the same, of course, when the writer employs narrative structure and effects such as tension and surprise to tell real people’s stories, but fiction has a license to play with the facts, to add color, conflict, and action, to… I hesitate to say “manipulate,” but that is the goal… to produce the strongest emotional punch possible, to lead to a satisfying catharsis. 

A film, say, provides every last visual detail in living color. But because a novel offers only words, it engages the reader’s imagination more fully, puts it to work filling in the imagery and color using personal references, and creating a version of the story that is the reader’s own.

A science fiction novel is often said to be the answer to the question “What if…?” Climate fiction can project into the future and speculate on any number of possible climate outcomes, depending on the steps taken or turned away from. Bringing these scenarios to life in ways that resonate personally can help us decide what the right steps are and how we might go about taking them.

Finally, I know you have a book that is just hitting shelves, but what’s next for you? Anything you’d like my readers to watch for?

As a break from finishing a long novel, I’ve been working on a series of short stories, linked by place and shared characters (as has become fashionable of late). They explore the very local impacts of climate change on rural farming communities such as my own, where a traditional way of life is being challenged not only by alterations in the weather but by the sudden influx of urbanites fleeing both the pandemic and deteriorating conditions in the cities due to climate events. A clash of cultures as well as the shocks of accelerating climate change. The sociology is complex, potentially violent, and it’s happening all around me. 

So again, the big question to consider – since it seems we can’t find the collective will to address the problem and try to restore Earth’s climate to its pre-industrial state – is how are we going to live with this terrible imbalance we’ve created? 

Who are we going to become?

A question certainly worth writing about. 

This article is part of the Climate Art Interviews series. It was originally published in Amy Brady’s “Burning Worlds” newsletter. Subscribe to get Amy’s newsletter delivered straight to your inbox.

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Amy Brady is the Deputy Publisher of Guernica magazine and Senior Editor of the Chicago Review of Books. Her writing about art, culture, and climate has appeared in the Village Voice, the Los Angeles TimesPacific Standard, the New Republic, and other places. She is also the editor of the monthly newsletter “Burning Worlds,” which explores how artists and writers are thinking about climate change. She holds a PHD in English and is the recipient of a CLIR/Mellon Library of Congress Fellowship. Read more of her work at AmyBradyWrites.com at and follow her on Twitter at @ingredient_x.

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

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