Creative Carbon Scotland

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Job: Three creative community workers

We are recruiting three creative community workers to work with us and the Fittie Community Development Trust (FCDT) to deliver our Culture Collective project.

These roles are imagined for experienced artists and creative practitioners who are looking to bring their creative skills to contribute to wider society. The three posts are:

  1. The Fittie community: This post will create a programme of creative initiatives and participatory events to bring the Hall and community connections back to life.
  2. Visitors and migration: This post will further a project focusing on stories of migration in Aberdeen, linking with visitors, other harbourside communities and Aberdeen Harbour.
  3. Climate Ready community: This post will focus on the impacts of climate change for coastal communities and the transition to net-zero carbon emissions, including community-owned energy.

Each creative community worker post is offered as a freelance contract for six months full-time with a total fee of £18,932 each, paid in monthly instalments in arrears. Contracts are flexible and can be spread out part-time over a year. Joint or group applications for each post are welcome. Applicants are asked to state which post they are applying for but can apply for more than one within the same application. No applicant will be offered more than one post.

All posts will be supported by Open Road and a dedicated project coordinator who will provide oversight and guidance, as well as a dedicated Trustee of the FCDT.

The deadline for applications is 5pm Monday 3rd May 2021.

Interviews will take place the week beginning 10th May 2021 and will be in person if restrictions allow or online.

The envisaged start date for the roles is June 2021.

For further information and details on how to apply see the information about Culture Collective on the Open Road website.

Please email for a copy of the recruitment document.

The post Job: Three creative community workers appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Young Writers Program 2021 by Mindselo (YWPM 2021)

Mindselo is a personal growth platform that seeks to transform ideas into wisdom. They want to create conscious minds connected to the world through their education system. 

Young Writers Program 2021 is a unique initiative by Mindselo where they are inviting writers, bloggers, journalists and other conscious minds to express their unique ideas on various topics in the form of a blog or article.

Through this program, they aim to build a community of passionate and conscious minds who can contribute to making this world a better place with their skills.

Benefits of participating in the Young Writers Program 2021 include:

  • Winners of this program will receive a unique title – Mindselo Bloggers.
  • The best submissions will be featured on the Mindselo official website, reaching a global audience.
  • Winners will gain access to the Mindselo Creators Program.
  • Winner will receive certification and many other future opportunities.

Eligibility requirements:

  • Proven ability to tell rich stories in words, video or both.
  • The blog or article should be written in Hindi or English.
  • The word limit is 250 words minimum and 1000 words maximum.
  • The article should be the author’s original work and should not be published anywhere else in any form.
  • There are no age restrictions.
  • All regions are eligible.

Application Process:

  1. Write a powerful and unique blog or article on the given topics.
  2. Submit your article using the registration link.

The deadline for submissions is 2nd July 2021.

For more information, please email Aman Kumar or phone on +919557178303.

The post Opportunity: Young Writers Program 2021 by Mindselo (YWPM 2021) appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Ocean ARTic – call for residency applications

Two residencies, likely to lead to commissions, where art and marine climate science will mingle.

We are inviting applications from creative practitioners – ideally a mix of visual and sound artists – for a data-led, innovative and potentially technological approach. There will be two residencies available, to start in May 2021. Successful applicants will be paired with a marine scientist to work collaboratively in developing a creative response to the marine science and data about climate change in the Arctic and its consequences there and at lower latitudes.

This project is led by MASTS, the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland, with the Blue Action research project and Creative Informatics as key project partners. The project timing is deliberately falling in a pivotal year for climate change negotiations at COP26, and the start of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030). We are developing an ambitious programme for exhibition and public-sharing of the resulting works from September 2021.

Full details, guidelines and an online application form are available on the Ocean ARTic webpage. In the context of COVID-19 risks and restrictions, these ‘residencies’ will be online for collaborative interactions. However, we have reserved some budget for potential travel and subsistence if circumstances allow, and will keep the situation under review.

The deadline is 17:00 Wednesday 28th April 2021.

The post Opportunity: Ocean ARTic – call for residency applications appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: UNFIX 2021 at the Barn residency

One week paid residency at the Barn between 7-13 June, as part of UNFIX Festival 2021.

The Barn is pleased to be partnering with UNFIX festival to offer a residency to Scotland-based artists at the Barn, Banchory, Aberdeenshire.

The Barn has a rich history of exploratory work in art and ecology. Our activities include live performances, projects and presentations across all art forms, intending to reach a diverse audience. For 2021, we have partnered with UNFIX festival, Scotland’s leading festival of performance and ecology, to deliver a residency at the Barn. This will take place between the 7-13 June 2021.

The week-long residency will be financially supported and we are looking for artists at all stages of the practice. We are particularly interested in hearing from artists working in contemporary performance, interdisciplinary practice, dance, moving image and live art.

The outcomes of this residency will be shared as part of UNFIX festival 2021 and we are interested in receiving proposals that bear COVID-19 restrictions in mind. This may include but is not limited to the realisation of existing ideas, virtual sharing or work-in-progress sessions (live or pre-recorded), artist-to-artist conversations, blog posts or reflections, moving image, audio works, podcasts, self-directed scores, postal projects and more.

Priority will be given to proposals that have clearly outlined and developed how the audience will interact with the work as part of the festival.

To apply, please visit the Barn’s website where you will find information on what we are looking for, what the residency will offer and full guidelines.

The application deadline is 5pm 16th April 2021.

The post Opportunity: UNFIX 2021 at the Barn residency appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Open call for climate focused participatory artists

ITAC is seekin g five participatory artists from around the world to join ITAC IMPACT: Climate

ITAC IMPACT: Climate is a new international project, run by ITAC, which invites participatory artists (also known in some countries as teaching artists), to develop project models, form a purpose-built collective and contribute to a new online curriculum for teaching artists with an interest in climate change.

The Climate Collective

ITAC will commission five teaching artists from around the world to design and deliver projects in their local communities that change beliefs and behaviours in relation to climate change. The geographically and culturally diverse artists will form the core of the Climate Collective – a subgroup of climate-engaged teaching artists who will learn from each other, provide peer-to-peer support, and experiment with different engagement methods. The Climate Collective will be supported by a science ambassador – a climate expert who provides scientific context to the project and informs the approach to monitoring, evaluation, and learning.

 A global audience

The impact of the Climate Collective’s work will be widely shared with arts, education, and climate networks, and through opportunities for presenting at high profile international conferences. The case studies will also form the basis of an accessible online teaching artist curriculum, informing and guiding practitioners in undertaking climate-conscious work in their own communities, around the world.

A new online curriculum

ITAC has partnered with kadenze – the largest online platform for arts learning – to develop an online curriculum based on the discoveries from the Climate Collective’s community engagement projects. Kadenze will employ a specially devised framework for technology-enabled creative learning to develop an accessible and engaging course that draws on the expertise and impact of the five international case studies.

A framework for creating and sustaining social change

ITAC IMPACT: Climate is the pilot project for establishing a framework through which teaching artists can positively impact complex social issues. By demonstrating the power of a dedicated subgroup of teaching artists to raise awareness, educate others, and ultimately change minds and behaviour in relation to climate change, ITAC lays the groundwork for future collaborations between the arts and other sectors to create social change.

Selected artists will receive up to £8000 each (inclusive of the design, delivery, and curriculum development). For further information about the project criteria and how to apply please visit the ITAC Impact: Climate website.

The deadline for applications is Monday 12th April.

The post Opportunity: Open call for climate focused participatory artists appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Guest Blog – ArtsUnboxed: Touring ideas, not people

In this guest blog, Melanie Precious, CEO of Greenwich Dance describes ArtsUnboxed, a safe, sustainable way of touring ideas rather than people.

It’s hard to pinpoint the exact moment the idea for ArtsUnboxed first came to me, certainly it was long before COVID-19.

At first it was just a little question, rumbling in the back of my head. I was thinking about the sharing and presenting of the work dance artists make and the model we all seem to revert to, more out of habit than anything else. For years we have been asking ourselves as a sector the very same question –  ‘could there be another way?

Admittedly the touring model is the way artists get their work seen. It’s the way venues bring new voices to their communities. It’s the way audiences share experiences with each other across auditoriums as well as across regions. But it presents many challenges. It carries financial risk – almost always for the artists themselves as much as the venues.

Presenting work from performers outside the region does little to support employment of the local artistic communities and the responsibility for whose job it is to actually promote the work – venue or visiting company? – can occasionally result in disappointment on both sides.

That’s all before you start looking at the funding model. Double-funding seems to be inherent in the way the entire touring model is built. Multiple rounds of funding bids from venues and companies working on the same production can result in staffing costs slicing through the funds, making less money available for the art itself. Then there’s that small issue of the existential climate crisis. I started to question the price we pay as a planet to ship dancers about the country, to places where there are already so many wonderful, cash-strapped performers trying to make a living.

No-one wants to see touring in this traditional form disappear altogether, otherwise how would we ever get to see the Royal Shakespeare Company or Birmingham Royal Ballet? But as I considered how other art forms seemed to distribute their work – writers, musicians, even chefs – I couldn’t quieten that voice. There must be another way.

And then COVID happened.

And with all performances cancelled, travel prohibited and theatres shut suddenly, the urgency to find a new way intensified. Not just because we needed art. (We did, of course. And do.) But because those artists needed to be paid.

Listening to a podcast one day, hearing musicians express relief that their PRS cheques were coming through their letterbox, I realised that I knew not one single dance artist fortunate enough to receive such post. Further into lockdown, my colleagues and I started to make plans for a socially distanced doorstep tour and realised, thanks to Facebook, that many others were thinking similarly. We are, I thought, all being paid to write the same things. Do the same work. Come up with the same ideas. Or, more tragically, not being paid at all.

And suddenly I knew.

We should tour ideas, not people.

We should think of our work as chefs do – who write recipes in books they are paid to write and then sell those books (and get paid again). Rather than worrying about whether anyone is following the instruction to the letter, they move on. Because ideas are what they do. And ideas are what they sell.

ArtsUnboxed aims to do just that. It’s a shop full of ideas.

It’s an online shelf upon which we are lining up recipe books for dance performance and participation projects. Recipes written by incredible artist and producer teams who have done all the thinking and planning and are willing to share all of their ideas with others in return for a royalty. Once the recipe boxes are bought, they can be utilised in any way the buyer chooses: exactly as written or adapted for new and differing audiences and settings. They can be treated as inspiration from which to leapfrog or use word for word like an architect’s blueprint. With buyers encouraged to cast their bought ‘recipe’ with local dancers and deliver it with local producers and educators, they offer a way of supporting local economy and artistry.

What’s more, if you like the concept of the ArtsUnboxed shop, you can submit your own recipe to the platform so that you and your artists also have a box on the shelf, for others to buy.

ArtsUnboxed is a revolutionary new way of working, and more importantly, thinking. It has been new for the artists who are making the work – and preparing themselves to let go of it. It’s new for us – developing it as we go, thinking through issues and obstacles as we meet them. For the solutions and refining of all of those steps I have much to thank the creative team for: Rajpal PardesiLucy WhiteLou Cope and Alex Covell, as well as our first cohort of artists, who are all informing and enriching the process with their ideas and perspective.

And it’s going to be new for venues, who will not have experienced being asked to buy ideas in this way before and may have to think about new ways of using them. However, within each box is everything needed to deliver the project or performance. The risk assessments, marketing assets, covid mitigation plans, tutorials, choreography, sample schedules, audio description, easy read transcripts. Everything. And with this ‘meal-at-home’ style, ‘everything in a box’ model, buyers can then use the time they save and the precious funding they receive to make more art. More dance. More culture.

It’s a new way. It may transform the way we think about touring. It may not. But if there was ever a time to experiment with something new, isn’t it now?

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Climate Beacons for COP26 – applications now open

Pioneering ‘Climate Beacons’ to bring together culture and green sectors for COP26 public engagement across Scotland.

Applications are now open for partnerships made up of Scotland-based organisations across the cultural and environmental sectors [1] to apply to take part in Climate Beacons for COP26.  

Climate Beacons for COP26 is an innovative project that will harness the cultural sector’s unique power to deliver deep-rooted public engagement with climate change through the once-in-a-generation opportunity of COP26 (‘Conference of the Parties’, the UN Climate Summit) coming to Glasgow in November. It will seize this chance to bring about lasting change within the cultural sector, society and policy in Scotland and provide an internationally inspiring example of Scotland’s climate leadership.   

This project will pair leading organisations in artscultureheritageclimate sciencepolicythe public sector, and civil society to form ‘Climate Beacons’ that will work in close collaboration to develop lasting public engagement with climate change in the lead-up to, during and after COP26. The Beacons will be situated around Scotland in a wide variety of locations, strengthening engagement with COP26 beyond Glasgow to the whole country and supporting the recovery of Scotland’s cultural sector from the impacts of COVID-19.   

Learning from the successes and failures of previous COP artistic programmes[2], Climate Beacons for COP26 will promote greater collaboration between the cultural and climate sectors, distribute activity more broadly and accessibly, and ensure that there is a long-term legacy beyond the UN Climate talks. It is now recognised that climate change is as much a socio-cultural issue as it is a technical, scientific, economic, or political one. With its ability to influence society, the cultural sector therefore has an essential role to play in addressing it.   

Creative Carbon Scotland is co-ordinating the project, bringing our existing expertise as a unique connecting role between sectors as well as learnings from ongoing research and collaborations. A steering group of ‘co-ordinating partners’ provides additional advice, contacts and networks. These partners are leading sector organisations and development bodies: Architecture and Design ScotlandCreative Scotland, the Edinburgh Climate Change InstituteMuseums Galleries Scotland, the Scottish Library and Information Council, and the Sustainable Scotland Network.

The project is funded by the Scottish Government, Creative Scotland, and Museums Galleries Scotland among others.   

The Climate Beacons will launch ahead of COP26 and continue to operate until mid-2022. Beacons will make use of the shared resources and knowledge of cultural venues and climate organisations to provide a welcoming physical and virtual space for conversation about COP26 and climate action between members of the public, artists and cultural sector professionals, environmental NGOs and wider civil society, scientists, and policymakers.  

Ben Twist, director of Creative Carbon Scotland, said: ‘The presence of the COP26 talks in Glasgow this year represents a major opportunity to boost climate action in Scotland. At Creative Carbon Scotland, we have witnessed the enthusiasm of arts organisations around the country for contributing to this activity. Climate Beacons provides an opportunity to direct the skills and resources of the arts sector into deep-seated and long-lasting public engagement that will ensure that this momentum continues long after the COP26 negotiations have concluded.’  

Dave Reay, executive director of the Edinburgh Climate Change Institute, said: ‘Creative Carbon Scotland has a proven track record of bringing together innovative collaborations between the cultural and climate sectors. The ambitious Climate Beacons project will share that expertise, setting up partnerships that will focus on engaging the public with COP26 but that will also establish connections and learning that will persist long into the future.’  

Applications are open to all Scottish-based organisations. For more information, including criteria and FAQs, and to apply, please visit our Climate Beacons for COP26 project pageNB: The application form is towards to the end of the page.

The closing date is 10th May at 9am, with successful partnerships announced at the end of May.


 Contact  

Lewis Coenen-Rowe, culture/SHIFT officer, lewis.coenen-rowe@creativecarbonscotland.com, 07741457824  

Notes  

[1] We define ‘culture’ here as encompassing the arts, heritage, crafts, creative industries, and design, including voluntary as well as professional organisations. We define ‘environmental’ organisations as any for whom some of or all their focus is on addressing the challenges (and opportunities) posed by environmental issues such as climate change. This could include local and national authorities, public bodies, NGOs and charities, community organisations, education institutions or businesses. 

[2] Our findings from a survey of previous arts and culture engagements with COPs are available here: https://www.creativecarbonscotland.com/resource/a-history-of-arts-and-culture-at-cops/.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Green Tease Reflections: Beautiful Disruption

25th February 2021. This event explored issues around how landscapes are managed, maintained, protected, and run in Scotland and how artists might ‘beautifully disrupt’ the status quo and find new approaches. It was organised in collaboration with artists Kerry Morrison and Jo Hodges and academics Dr Tim Acott and Dr Eirini Saratsi. 

Opening Activity

This event started with a quick activity. Attendees were invited to think of an example of a rural or urban landscape that they were close to or was significant for them and write down:

  1. The ways that this landscape was or might be threatened or contested
  2. Who should make decisions about that landscape

The results looked like this:

Green Tease Reflections: Beautiful Disruption
Speakers

We then heard from our speakers. Eirini Saratsi and Tim Acott shared their perspectives on issues around how landscapes are managed and the roles of the arts. After this Jo Hodges and Kerry Morrison shared a series of ‘beautiful disruptions’, examples of situations where the arts have creatively intervened in landscape decision making. These talks are available here as a video with a summary below.

Dr Eirini Saratsi is a lecturer at Reading University and part of the AALERT (Arts and Artists in Landscape and Environmental Research Today) network. She talked about the importance of bringing together people interested in landscape and environmental management but coming from very different fields to enable learning from each other and find new ways of collaborating. This process is not straightforward because landscape decision making is very complex, involves entrenched power dynamics, and is seen in different ways from different sectors.

Landscape decisions are made on the macro scale by national bodies but also on he micro scale by individuals and communities. Decisions are also not only made by humans. The natural world does restrict or enable our actions, so decision making is more accurately framed as an exchange rather than a one-way process.

Dr Tim Acott is a lecturer at Greenwich University and part of the AALERT network as well as running the research project Wetland Life. He emphasised the interaction between values and decision making. Various types of values are embedded into different cultural, institutional and disciplinary contexts, with different people having differing priorities. This can lead to conflicts or alliances forming between fields. For examples social scientists, economists and ecologists tend to try to measure the value of things in different ways that might support or undermine each other.

Conversely, we can also argue that the landscape has an innate value of its own in a way that is independent of how humans view it. Measuring and eliciting values also tends to reinforce certain types of values over others, so we have to be careful about which lenses we use and try to retain the ability to see the world through different lenses when discussing the value of landscapes.

Kerry Morrison and Jo Hodges are public artists who both produce work that engages with landscape use. They shared examples from their own work and that of other artists.

  • A New Environmental Impact Assessment: Environment, Imagination and Aesthetics: Artists Jo Hodges and Robbie Coleman and researcher Claire Haggett worked with people living close to the site of a proposed new windfarm to explore how planning processes for new wind developments can use artistic methods to consider impacts on people, place and community.
  • Grass is not Green: Artist Kerry Morrison took a piece of park lawn and suspended any mowing or management of it, allowing it to develop naturally without intervention. She then documented the plants that grew there and held public workshops where people could learn about and experience them.
  • Sphagnum Splat: Artist Kate Foster and the Crichton Carbon Centre organised a creative day out at a peat bog in Galloway to symbolically and practically support its restoration. Participants created banners and played music then threw moss-laden peat-balls into the bare patches of the deforested peat bog.
  • The Red Brigade: A protest group that perform ritualised mourning ceremonies at natural sites that are threatened with destruction.
  • Bridge Garden: During the 2019 Extinction Rebellion, protestors occupied Waterloo Bridge and symbolically transformed it into a garden, installing temporary trees and plants along its length.
  • Guerrilla Grafters: A group that secretly grafts fruit bearing stems onto non-fruit bearing varieties of fruit trees grown in public places. The trees then start to produce fruit for the enjoyment of the general public.
  • GIPT: Artists Robbie Coleman and Jo Hodges were invited by Tønsberg council to find new ways of engaging residents with an underused site – the foundation of a historical round church. The artists created a temporary garden and social space on the site that cultivated the herbs that had been grown there in medieval times and then harvested these for community use.
  • Climavore: This seashore installation had a dual use as a habitat for oysters and other sea life at high tide and a dining table for humans at low tide. Performative meals using sustainably sourced seafood were held at the table as a space for discussions around sustainable use of seascapes.
  • Human Cost: A work of protest art by Liberate Tate that sought to alert visitors to the gallery to its sponsorship by fossil fuel companies and the harm fossil fuel extraction causes to landscapes elsewhere. Artist Amy Scaife covered herself in oil-like treacle and lay in foetal position in the centre of the gallery.
Discussion

Following this, Laura Campbell, Policy and Advice Manager at NatureScot, offered a live example of a contested landscape in Scotland for participants to discuss: Muir of Dinnet National Nature Reserve and Site of Special Scientific Interest in Aberdeenshire. Her concern was about access. They are keen to encourage people to access nature and its benefits, but what is the best approach when a small number leave litter or cause damage that affects others’ enjoyment?  Responses from attendees included:

  • The example shows a need for greater understanding and communication between local rural residents and visiting urban residents, so that visitors can better understand how to behave and understand the importance of leaving no trace
  • People who litter are in one sense behaving naturally. The need to tidy up after ourselves is an unnatural behaviour that we have had to develop in response to our material-heavy culture. How can we change entrenched culture and perceptions?
  • Much is said about the need to reconnect with nature (especially for urban dwellers) so we need to encourage people to visit and enjoy natural sites while ensuring their protection. Who decides what the ideal balance between these things is?
  • Who gets to decide who can and cannot visit a site? Does this connote ideas of ownership that are anathema to an equal relationship with landscapes.
  • How can we give agency to the landscape and it’s non-human inhabitants in these decisions?
Closing Activity

Finally, attendees were encouraged to take everything that they had learned from the session and apply it to the landscapes that they imagined in the initial exercise, considering how they might beautify, disrupt, or beautifully disrupt the situations they had outlined. The results looked like this:

Green Tease Reflections: Beautiful Disruption 3

About Green Tease

grey oblique lines growing darker, then a green line with an arrow pointing right and overlaid text reading 'culture SHIFT'

This event is taking place as part of the Green Tease events series and network, a project organised by Creative Carbon Scotland, bringing together people from arts and environmental backgrounds to discuss, share expertise, and collaborate. Green Tease forms part of our culture/SHIFT programme. 

The post Green Tease Reflections: Beautiful Disruption appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Adapting our Culture: workshop for cultural organisations

Creative Carbon Scotland are hosting a workshop to explore the new Adapting our Culture toolkit, for cultural organisations planning for a climate-changed future.

About the event

The Adapting our Culture toolkit, which was launched at the recent Cultural Adaptations conference, is designed to support cultural organisations and institutions in their planning for a sustainable, resilient and climate-changed future.

This toolkit will help you:

  1. Explore what adaptation to climate change is
  2. Identify how climate changes will impact your organisation and your work
  3. Help you develop your first adaptation action plan

At this workshop we will provide an overview of the toolkit, and take an interactive dive into certain sections. We aim to inform, inspire and prepare attendees to use the toolkit after the workshop.

Please register to attend the event, which will take place on 31st March at 4pm. 

For more on adapting cultural organisations to the impacts of climate change, please visit the Cultural Adaptations website.

Opportunity: Moths to a Flame – An invitation to join in making artwork for COP26

Everyone is invited to join this nationwide creative response to the climate emergency for COP26.

“We’re asking people to help us make 20,000 moths and record their messages for the Moths to a Flame installation at COP26. The artwork allows us all to make a mark, have our say, show our willingness for action and bring a bit of beauty to COP26.” Chloë Uden, artist and founder of the Art and Energy Collective.

2021 is a really important year for action on climate change. Later this year, the UK is hosting the United Nations Climate Conference in Glasgow – also known as COP26. What gets decided by world leaders there will define the future that today’s young people inherit. The time is now to drive action on climate change, and show people that by coming together we can make a difference.

The Art and Energy Collective and Plymouth Energy Community have been planning this momentous artwork since 2019 and everyone is invited to get involved.

Moths have something to tell us about our relationship with energy; there are over 2,500 species of moth in the UK and most of them live in a mysterious nocturnal world so we don’t notice them much. They are secret pollinators and a vital part of our ecosystem. The UK has seen a drastic drop in the number of moths in recent years owing to pollution, farming methods, reduction in habitats and light pollution. This indicator species tells us a lot about the health of our planet.

This project raised over £40k through Plymouth City Council Climate Challenge Crowdfunder to work with people across the UK to build the artwork.

For access to resources for all ages and more information on how to get involved please visit the Moths to a Flame website. The team will be running free events, including making sessions, augmented reality activities, poetry writing, live moth-watching events and school workshops. There are all sorts of ways people can get involved.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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