Creative Carbon Scotland

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Cultural Adaptations Conference – tickets launching soon!

Tickets for the Cultural Adaptations conference will launch soon. Register now to be one of the first to know.

The conference, which aims to share the learnings from the Creative Europe-funded project over four days of presentations, workshops and networking, will take place online from 2nd to 5th March 2021.

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has compelled us to cancel plans to host the conference in Glasgow and to take it online instead. This means barriers created by travel restrictions are removed, and there’s an opportunity for global participation and contribution on a scale we could not have envisaged previously. And we’ll still ensure there’s some uniquely Glaswegian and Scottish style included!

Cultural Adaptations is a Creative Europe project, led by Creative Carbon Scotland with partners in Scotland and three EU countries, on culture’s role in society’s adaptation to climate, and the adaptation issues that cultural organisations need to think about.

For almost 30 months, four cultural organisations have been exploring collaboratively how this approach can work in countries with similar climate challenges but differing socio-political frameworks. Each cultural partner is working with a local adaptation partner.


TICKETS LAUNCHING SOON

We’ll soon be launching tickets for the four-day virtual conference and we plan to announce the full programme and speakers shortly afterwards. Here’s what we can share so far:

  • The conference spans four days
  • Each day includes digital social activities and creative takes on a digital conference
  • The days are themed allowing you to focus on your preferred topics and engage in new areas of work –
    • Day 1 – Transformation in Culture
    • Day 2 – Transforming and Adapting
    • Day 3 – Transformation of Culture
    • Day 4 – Transformation through Culture

Register your interest now to get first dibs on tickets.

More information about the conference can be found on the Cultural Adaptations website.

We encourage cultural organisations in Scotland and further afield to team up with an adaptation organisation to attend this exciting conference together and find inspiration for your own projects and initiatives. And, vice versa.

Cultural Adaptations is co-funded by the Creative Europe programme of the European Union with match-funding from Scottish Government.

The post Cultural Adaptations Conference – tickets launching soon! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Artist commission for Craigie Pocket Place, Perth

Could you create a piece of public art that helps people walking and cycling to find their way?

Sustrans, in partnership with Perth and Kinross Council, is looking for an ambitious artist who creates high-quality, innovative public artwork with community engagement at its core. Due to current physical distancing guidance, we are particularly interested in local artists who can travel safely and sustainably to Perth, or who can suggest a reasonable alternative method for researching and installing the project.

The team is looking for a site-specific piece of public art that helps people walking and cycling to find their way. The art should draw on the comments and ideas gathered through the Craigie Pocket Place public engagement process and help to point out important local places, as well as the National Cycle Network route. The artist should consider how the new artwork can be accessible ‘for everyone’, including blind and partially sighted people.

Notes of interest should be submitted by 31st January 2021.

Visit the Sustrans website for the full brief or contact christina.eley@sustrans.org.uk 

Find out more about the Craigie Pocket Place Project.

The post Opportunity: Artist commission for Craigie Pocket Place, Perth appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Call for applications – A.R.C Challenge Malaysia Grant

The British Council is delighted to announce the A.R.C Challenge Malaysia Grant in response to climate change and COP26.

The British Council in Malaysia is inviting applications for the A.R.C. Malaysia Challenge Grant, which brings together stakeholders from the arts and creative industries, education, science and civil society sectors to collaborate on a common challenge in response to climate change and offer innovative and interdisciplinary solutions that create awareness and enhance resilience among youth. The A.R.C. Malaysia Challenge will be part of the cultural programme activities in the build up to the United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), which the UK is hosting on 1–12 November 2021.

The A.R.C. Challenge Malaysia Grant provides seed funding for collaborations between stakeholders in the UK and Malaysia, which respond to a common challenge in the field of climate change through shared solutions that empower young people to take positive action which can cascade awareness and create greater resilience amongst others in their generation, as well as influence policy making.

The British Council Malaysia is offering three seed funding grants of up to £10,000 each to kick-start innovative, joint UK-Malaysia responses to a shared climate change challenge involving young people aged 18–35. We encourage cross-sectoral collaboration in our grant applications. Ideally, we would include projects which are from the arts and creative industries, education and science sectors in our final awards.

Successful grants will be announced during the first A.R.C. Challenge Malaysia Forum on 4 February 2021. Awardees will then have the opportunity to pitch their projects during the second A.R.C. Challenge Malaysia Forum on 25 March 2021 to an audience of diverse stakeholders including potential funders, policy makers, research, academic and youth organisations, in the hope that their project will spark further interest that may lead to scaling-up and sustainability.

Successful applicants will be awarded a grant of up to £10,000 and are expected to deliver their projects from 15 February 2021, complete all activities by 15 November 2021 and submit the project report to the British Council by 30 November 2021.

Eligible applicants are invited to complete and submit the application form via email by Friday 22 January 2021 (5 p.m. Malaysia time / 9 a.m. UK time).

For further information on the grant, eligibility, application process and contact details, please refer to our website.

The post Opportunity: Call for applications – A.R.C Challenge Malaysia Grant appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Just Imagine arts competition

Can you reimagine a future where we put nature at the heart of our decisions?

WWF has launched a nationwide competition calling on creatives to produce artworks that reimagine a greener, thriving future – where nature is at the heart of our decisions. The initiative, titled ‘Just Imagine’, hopes to spark conversations about the solutions to the climate and nature crisis and drive positive change through art.

Now open for entries, the competition welcomes submissions across a variety of disciplines, including visual arts, illustration, fashion and textiles, poetry, creative writing, and other art forms. Entrants are encouraged to use their artistic explorations to capture how we can best live in harmony with our planet and what our rebuilt future could look like.

The competition follows the release of Sir David Attenborough’s new film, ‘A Life On Our Planet’, in which he reflects on the changes to the natural world during his lifetime and presents his hopeful vision for the future. WWF, who co-produced the film, is encouraging individuals, arts collectives and artist networks from across the UK to take inspiration from Attenborough’s powerful witness statement and respond to the competition brief with their own ‘reimagined’ future.

Entries will close at 5pm on Monday, 25 January 2021. A panel of judges – including award-winning graphic designer Greg Bunbury, painter poet Judy Ling Wong CBE and award-winning Anthropological Future Designer Stacie Woolsey – will then select 12 winners to feature in a virtual exhibition, hosted by WWF-UK.

The exhibition aims to inspire and influence local communities, while illustrating the power of the creative community in shaping new ways of thinking.

The post Opportunity: Just Imagine arts competition appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Guest blog: Common-sense solutions to our climate and nature crises

Scottish geographer and energy specialist, Neil Kitching, recently independently published ‘Carbon Choices’, a book on the common-sense solutions to our climate and nature crises.

In Carbon Choices, I identify five common sense principles to tackle climate change:

1. Price carbon pollution
2. Consume carefully, travel wisely
3. Embrace efficiency, avoid waste
4. Nurture nature
5. Be fair across current and future generations

In this blog, I explore the carbon impact of arts and culture and how we can apply these five principles in Scotland.

The direct carbon footprint of arts and culture can be low compared to more mechanised forms of entertainment – dominated by the energy used to heat the buildings that house activities and cultural events. Conversely, the indirect footprint is often high. Audience travel to a concert is the largest component of its carbon footprint, whilst many people travel long distances to view culture and art, for example, to see famous buildings and works of art that are usually sited in large cities such as Glasgow and Edinburgh.

What is perhaps more interesting is that the arts and culture can influence society and cultural norms and behaviour, which can increase or decrease society’s carbon footprint. The creativity of people who work in art and design needs to be harnessed to challenge, inform and engage audiences on the impacts of climate change and in the actions we can all choose to take to reduce our carbon footprint. This can be active, for example, an exhibition on climate change, or embedded more subtly into wider messages.

Price carbon pollution
Placing a realistic price on carbon pollution is an action that government should lead on. But in the meantime, you should calculate your organisation’s carbon footprint* and reduce it as far as possible. This includes your use of gas and electricity and travel by your staff but should be widened to include what you buy and audience travel. The V&A is a magnificent modern museum in Dundee (pictured above) heated by efficient heat pumps, yet the building itself is built from concrete, which is a carbon intensive building material. Only by thinking in a holistic way can we start to consider and then tackle the full impact of our activities.

* You can use Creative Carbon Scotland’s carbon management tools to help with this.

Consume carefully, travel wisely
Consuming carefully is all about thinking about what you buy. Can you buy second hand, can you reuse costumes, props and equipment? If you do have to buy, buy quality goods that will last and can be reused. Meanwhile, having good quality and accessible public transport, whilst actively discouraging people to travel by car, is the best policy to reduce the carbon footprint of events. Organisers often put on coaches to get young people to music concerts in remote rural locations such as RockNess. The Solheim Cup golf event at Gleneagles in Scotland is a good example of a major event held in a rural area where no public car parking was provided. Instead, visitors had to travel by train or use the park and ride facilities set up for the event.

Embrace efficiency, avoid waste
Investing in energy efficiency is often the first action an organisation takes when it decides to ‘go green’. It is a good place to start; there is usually obvious wastage, and it saves money. But also consider your use of other resources such as water, and resources used to manufacture the equipment that you buy. Everything you buy has a carbon footprint, whether it is made from natural resources such as timber and cotton or is mined from the ground such as minerals or oil. Avoid waste by reusing – do everything possible to prolong the life of objects before they need to be recycled.

Nurture nature

country lane with cattle grate in foreground. Background shows a hill divided by a fenceline - one side shows tree regeneration while the other is only heather and low shrubbery.
Tree regeneration in the Cairngorms, Scotland.

Nature is integral to our climate – trees and healthy soils store carbon. We need to do more than protect and preserve nature, we need to enhance and restore it. Society influences our attitudes to nature. For example, in Europe wolves gained a bad name in books and folklore and were hunted to extinction in Scotland in 1680. In reality they avoid humans and are an essential part of the ecosystem, suppressing herbivores, which if uncontrolled prevent tree saplings from growing. The arts and culture can influence people in a positive way, for example, the BBC’s Blue Planet had a huge impact by raising awareness across the world of the impact of plastic in the oceans. The film Avatarappealed to a wide audience of science-fiction fans but also contained a strong pro-environmental message.

Be fair across current and future generations
‘Be fair’ combines the concepts of equity and social justice. It applies to wealth differences within and between countries and between the young, old and future generations. This is the most difficult of the five principles to apply, yet arts and culture can be used to proactively influence society. Theatre and cinema can highlight inequality and injustice, whilst TV documentaries can explore issues of toxic waste (such as radioactive particles on Scottish beaches) and heavy metals from mining, which may impact future generations.

Grounds for hope
Amidst all the bad news, there are grounds for hope – Carbon Choices concludes with a green action plan for government, business and individuals to make better carbon choices.


This guest blog was posted by Neil Kitching, author of Carbon Choices, which is available to buy on Amazon. One third of profits will be donated to rewilding projects.

Neil Kitching in outdoor walking clothes sitting on a rock near the sea holding a pair of binoculars, with Bass Rock in the backgrount
Neil Kitching

The post Guest blog: Common-sense solutions to our climate and nature crises appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Endangered Landscapes Artist Residencies and Art Prize

Expressions of interest are open for one month for an exciting new residency in the Cairngorms.

An exciting new opportunity has been launched by the Endangered Landscapes Programme inviting artists to undertake a residency in eight landscapes across Europe, including within the Cairngorms Connect project area in the Cairngorms National Park.

As part of a collaboration with the Cambridge Conservation Initiative’s Arts, Science and Conservation Programme, an artist or collective will work alongside partners in Cairngorms Connect and the local community to explore the landscape in new ways.

The residency is open to all contemporary artists, makers or collectives, with priority given to those who have a link to the landscape in the Cairngorms, to submit an expression of interest from 7th January 2021 as part of a two-stage competitive process.

Entries are welcomed from any medium, from new to traditional artforms which will allow reconnection with nature. This could include, but is not limited to: music, painting, writing, ceramics, photography, glassblowing, sculpture, poetry, performance, and site-specific installation.

The creation of this collaborative process recognises the importance the arts play in addressing environmental challenges and understanding how people and communities interact with the landscape.

Starting in June 2021, the selected proposal will celebrate this across land managed by Forestry and Land Scotland, NatureScot, RSPB Scotland and Wildland Limited, which make up the Cairngorms Connect project area, with $5,400 US dollars being awarded as part of the residency.

Residencies are also available in the seven other implementation landscape restoration projects funded by the Endangered Landscapes Programme, including in Wales and throughout Europe. This gives opportunities for artists to work in diverse habitats, though they are expected to have a significant link to their chosen project area. At the end of the residencies, there will be an art prize of $2,500 US dollars awarded to the most outstanding piece of work from the eight implementation project areas.

Further information about the residencies can be found on the website: https://www.endangeredlandscapes.org/landscape-residencies with expressions of interest forms available from 7th January for one month.

The post Opportunity: Endangered Landscapes Artist Residencies and Art Prize appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Electric vehicles and their role in the green recovery

Are you on a mission to ‘Build Back Better’ by reducing your travel-related emissions? Do you want to contribute to the green recovery? Investing in an electric vehicle (EV) is one way you can achieve these goals.

We know from our work with Scotland’s cultural sector and our carbon management planning and emissions reporting support that travel is often the biggest source of an organisation’s emissions, whilst also being a necessary part of what they do – whether it is touring work, travelling staff or even attracting audiences to their space. Road transport contributes to one fifth of greenhouse gas emissions (produced by burning petrol and diesel) in the UK.[1]

EVs are a key way in which we can reduce our fossil fuel consumption and the climate change-causing gases they produce. Of course, they’re not cheap. However, government ambitions for net zero, combined with the desire for a green recovery as we emerge from COVID-19, are resulting in more investment and incentives that might just bring an EV within reach for you or your organisation.

We’ve worked with our energy expert partners, Good Energy, to produce this special edition resource to share some insights into EVs and the things you might want to consider.

How long have EVs been around?

It is suggested[2] that one of the earliest electric vehicles was invented in 1832 and, even better, it happened in Scotland! Other electric vehicles were invented and manufactured in Europe and the US right through until the early 1900s, but their popularity was short-lived due to the rollout of mass car production. Now, however, EVs are making an impressive comeback. They’re easier to buy than ever before, and what’s more both the Scottish and UK governments are pushing for their uptake to help them achieve their net zero targets, and as we seek to ‘build back better’ following the Covid-19 pandemic.

Governments are getting behind EVs

Governments are promoting a green recovery to repair the damage wrought by the pandemic and to combat climate change. Getting behind EVs is one focus of their green recovery strategies. The Scottish Government aims to phase out sales of new petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2032[3] and has been actively promoting EVs since at least 2013 when it published Switched On Scotland: A Roadmap to Widespread Adoption of Plug-in Vehicles. In November 2020, the UK Government announced it was bringing forward its target to end sales from 2035 to 2030 alongside a £1.3 billion investment into EV charging points.[4]

This year has seen a number of new electric cars become available, and there are now more affordable options, many from household car brands such as Hyundai, Kia, Peugeot, Renault and Vauxhall[5]amongst others. According to Next Green Car, combined EV (i.e. pure electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle or PHEV*) market share is up on last year from 3.8% in September 2019 to 10.5% in September 2020.[6]

Although many journeys can be made by public transport (particularly in well-connected cities) or avoided (through digital communications), EVs provide a cleaner, greener option for those who need a car (or van) to tour, traverse the country or who live and work in more rural areas. EVs are becoming far more common in the UK. There are now more than 164,000 pure electric cars and almost 350,000 plug-in models (including PHEVs) on our roads.[7] This is expected to increase to a million within the next two years and, if projections by the National Grid in a UK Government briefing paper are realised, there will be between 2.7 and 10.6 million EVs in the UK by 2030.[8] Mind you, it’s important to note that the phase-out mentioned above will include hybrid and plug-in hybrid models from 2035, so if you’re looking to futureproof your driving you’re probably better going straight to a pure electric vehicle.

Below we talk about some of the key considerations when thinking about investing in an electric vehicle.

  • Emission-free travel A traditional car requires fuel and emits gases often associated with climate change. The electric engines in EVs operate on a closed circuit, so there are no emissions. And, if the electricity you use to power your electric vehicle is sourced from 100% renewable sources (sun, wind, rain), the travel itself doesn’t produce any emissions either.
  • Lower running costs As fuel costs fluctuate globally, electricity prices are often cheaper and more secure so your ‘tank’ of electricity can work out to be a fraction of the fossil fuel fill-up cost. Other savings can be made via your home energy supply – for example, Good Energy offers a specific electric vehicle tariff for those charging cars at home – and on your road tax, because there isn’t any for pure EVs, they’re exempt!
  • Less maintenance Electric engines have fewer moving parts than internal combustion engines, which means there’s less to go wrong. Electric engines are generally smaller and quieter too.
  • Popularity As more and more people switch to using EVs, the number of vehicles available increases (to buy and to hire); charging places increase, insurance premiums are driven down and the number of petrol stations decreases, all leading to a better electric driving experience.
  • Range anxiety (fear of running out of charge before reaching your destination) and charging locations – When EVs were first introduced, the distances they could travel on a ‘full tank’ were shorter than a fossil fuel-powered car. However, now EVs have a range of 100 miles plus[9] (meaning you could get from Edinburgh to Aberdeen on a single charge) and most car journeys are actually less than 30 miles. The UK charging network is expanding on a daily basis, providing reassurance for those travelling longer distances. Statistics from Zap Map indicate that, as at 16th November 2020, there are 20,192 charging devices in 12,713 locations across the UK, which is a marked increase from three years ago when there were only 4,800 locations. In fact, statistically, Scotland has more charging points per person than most other areas of the UK, and the Highlands has more public charging points than Edinburgh or Glasgow[10]. The Scottish Government’s national EV charging network, ChargePlace Scotland, currently has 1500+ public charge points. One Point by Good Energy helps organisations install 100% renewable energy charging points on their premises, for use by their staff, visitors and audiences.
  • Charge time – Charging electric vehicles does take longer than a petrol station stop. Most EVs are charged overnight (which is good as demand for electricity is lower at night), but 30-minute, rapid-charging is available for those doing longer journeys. Drive Electric says you can top up your charge from empty to 80% full in 30 minutes with a 50kW rapid charger, which most newer charging points tend to be.[11] Most public charging points are located near cafes, shopping centres…or even cultural attractions so you’re free to do something else while your car gets back to full. For example, the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh enables visitors to charge while visiting their exhibitions.
  • Initial cost and the incentives to buy – It’s true that electric vehicles are more expensive to buy than their conventional counterparts, but the government push towards EVs means prices are decreasing, urged on by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), the UK car industry lobby group.[12] The Scottish Government’s interest-free low carbon loan scheme provides individuals and businesses with up to £28,000 for a new electric car or van or, since the scheme was extended in September 2020, up to £20,000 for a used one.[13] There is a list of eligible vehicles; plug-in hybrid models are excluded as are current EV owners. The loan is available in addition to the UK Government’s plug-in car and van grants, which will pay for 20% of the purchase price for eligible vehicles, up to a maximum of £3,000 and £8,000 respectively.[14] The grant is applied by the car dealership at the point of purchase.

There’s funding available from organisations in Scotland like the Energy Savings Trust, for those looking to purchase EVs! If you really want to find out more, here is a recording of a 2019 webinar that gives a ‘deep dive’ into the topic:

These incentives combined may be the perfect opportunity for Scottish creative practitioners and cultural organisations using a car or van for their work or touring schedule to make their first foray into the world of EVs, thus making a positive contribution to the green recovery while dramatically reducing their greenhouse gas emissions.

One Point by Good Energy

One Point by Good Energy helps organisations install 100% renewable energy charging points on their premises, for the use of their staff, visitors and audience. As supporters of the Green Arts Initiative, we know they’re experts in renewable electricity, and are committed to enabling the cultural sector to help lead society in climate action. Find out more in this video or get more information:

Some final words

If you’re still not convinced about the pros of electric vehicles, have a read of this blog from the Energy Saving Trust, whose team members shared their experiences of owning and driving EVs. They’ve also written an excellent article on EVs and the green recovery, which is well worth reading.

This is a big topic and we’ve barely touched the sides, but we hope it’s helped you understand electric vehicles, their increased use on UK roads and their advantages a little better. If you have an EV, have experiences with buying or hiring, or have a case study to share with the sector – let us know!

Electric Vehicles and their role in the Green Recovery

We worked with our partner – renewable energy expert, Good Energy – to produce this blog. Good Energy are suppliers of genuine renewable electricity and are committed to enabling the cultural sector to help lead society in climate action. They are supporters of Creative Carbon Scotland and the Green Arts Initiative.


Pure electric vehicles are powered solely by electric motors, most often using a rechargeable battery. Plug-in hybrid vehicles generally use a rechargeable battery and petrol or diesel.

[1] https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/environmentalaccounts/articles/roadtransportandairemissions/2019-09-16, accessed 17/11/2020

[2] Driving.co.uk (https://www.driving.co.uk/the-power-to-surprise/history-electric-car/), MG (https://mg.co.uk/hub/electric/the-history-of-electric-vehicles-a-timeline/), WhatCar (https://www.whatcar.com/news/history-of-the-electric-car/n18063), accessed 16/11/2020

[3] Scottish Government website: https://www.gov.scot/policies/renewable-and-low-carbon-energy/low-carbon-transport/, accessed 16/11/2020

[4] https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-54981425, accessed 18/11/2020

[5] https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/best-cars/top-10-best-electric-cars, accessed 16/11/2020

[6] https://www.nextgreencar.com/electric-cars/statistics/, accessed 16/11/2020

[7] https://www.nextgreencar.com/electric-cars/statistics/, accessed 17/11/2020

[8] David Hirst, ‘Electric vehicles and infrastructure’, Briefing Paper 7480, House of Commons Library, 25 March 2020, p.6.

[9] https://www.buyacar.co.uk/cars/economical-cars/electric-cars/726/electric-car-range-how-far-will-they-really-go-on-a-single, accessed 17/11/2020

[10] https://www.energyvoice.com/renewables-energy-transition/211147/scotland-leads-the-charge-on-electric-vehicle-roll-out/, accessed 17/11/2020

[11] https://www.drive-electric.co.uk/how-long-does-it-take-to-charge-an-electric-car/, accessed 17/11/2020

[12] https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/04/higher-price-of-electric-cars-a-concern-for-more-than-half-of-uk-consumers, accessed 17/11/2020

[13] https://energysavingtrust.org.uk/grants-and-loans/electric-vehicle-loan/, accessed 16/11/2020

[14] https://www.gov.uk/plug-in-car-van-grants accessed 16/11/2020

Library of Creative Sustainability: Casa Río

This week [Creative Carbon Scotland] published [its] first case study from South America.

Casa Río: Building Power Lab is a centre of research, exchange, training and learning located between the Río de la Plata Estuary and the university city of La Plata in Argentina with transborder connections to UruguayParaguayBolivia and Brazil.

Through creative collaborations, resulting in photography, field recordings, interviews, drawing, sound art, painting, cartography and other perceptual and communicational tools, the project responds to the damaging effects on the basin from a range of environmental pressures.

This is a terrific addition to the Library, and we’ll be adding more soon. If you know of a story, from anywhere in the world, that you feel might be suitable, please get in touch with Lewis Coenen-Rowe.

Read our first South American case study

Opportunity: RSA Annual Exhibition 2021 – Call to Artists

Online submissions is now open for the RSA Annual Exhibition 2021.

The RSA Annual Exhibition is the most extensive exhibition of contemporary art and architecture in Scotland. Having been a mainstay of the academy’s calendar since its inception 195 years ago, the Annual Exhibition has evolved over the years, showcasing Scottish art alongside invited international artists, often including topical or political elements, to give an uncensored, independent voice to artists on issues that matter to them. For the first time in its history the 2020 Annual Exhibition was mounted online only due to the COVID-19 pandemic, however we aim to return with a physical exhibition in the RSA galleries from 4 April – 9 May 2021, with all necessary safety precautions.

After the success of its re-introduction in 2019, the Open Art element will return once again in 2021 as a vital component of the RSA Annual Exhibition. Online submission is now open for the 2021 exhibition for works of any scale and in any fine art medium.

To submit work to be considered for the exhibition artists must register and complete the online application process at www.royalscottishacademy.oess1.uk

Artists may submit up to TWO works of any dimensions in any fine art medium, including drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, film, installation and performance.

An entry fee (inclusive of VAT) is required for each work: £15 per work / students £10 per work. There is also a £10 hanging fee for any work hung in the exhibition.

Deadline for submissions is Wednesday 3 February 2021 at 5pm.

Please read through the REGULATIONS and FAQs on our website before submitting work.

The post Opportunity: RSA Annual Exhibition 2021 – Call to Artists appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: RSA Annual Exhibition 2021 – Call to Architects

Online submissions are now open for the RSA Annual Exhibition 2021.

We are delighted to announce that the RSA Open Exhibition of Architecture is returning once again this spring as part of the 195th RSA Annual Exhibition. On view from 4 April – 9 May 2021, the exhibition will showcase a diverse range of contemporary art and architecture from our Royal Scottish Academicians, plus artists and architects carefully selected from online open submissions.

The Open Architecture element aims to highlight some of the most interesting current architectural practices across Scotland and beyond.

Online submission is now open for the 2021 exhibition for works of any scale and in any suitable architectural medium – including models/3D, drawing, photography and film/animations.

To submit work to be considered for the exhibition architects must register and complete the online application process at www.royalscottishacademy.oess1.uk

Architects may submit up to TWO works of any dimensions in any suitable medium, including drawing, photography, print, film and models/3D.

An entry fee (inclusive of VAT) is required for each work: £25 per work / students £10 per work. There is also a £10 hanging fee for any work hung in the exhibition.

Deadline for submissions is Wednesday 3rd February 2021 at 5pm.

Please read the REGULATIONS and FAQs on our website before submitting work.

The post Opportunity: RSA Annual Exhibition 2021 – Call to Architects appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico