Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity – Ocean ARTic workshop: expressions of interest

Exploring how creativity can interact with marine science and data to tell climate stories.

Ocean ARTic is a new partnership that aims to bring creatives and marine climate scientists together to explore the impact of climate change in the Arctic and Scotland through climate data.

Here we invite expressions of interest for a workshop on the 1st April 2021. The project will then go on to provide residency and commission opportunities, but also aims to leave a legacy of a broader network of collaborators between Scotland’s creative and marine science communities.

We are looking for creatives interested in working with marine climate scientists to consider how creativity can interact with marine science in ways that encourage a broader audience to engage, particularly through a data-led, innovative and potentially technological approach.

This new partnership, funded by Creative Scotland and led by Marine Alliance Science Technology Scotland (MASTS), has been established in a pivotal year for climate change negotiations at COP26, and the start of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030).

For more information and how to get involved, see the website.

The post Opportunity – Ocean ARTic workshop: expressions of interest appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Emma Nicolson joins the Creative Carbon Scotland board

Creative Carbon Scotland welcomes Emma Nicolson, head of creative programmes at the Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh (RGBE), as the trustee nominated by founding member organisation, the Scottish Contemporary Art Network (SCAN).

Emma Nicolson has replaced outgoing board member, Clare Harris, as SCAN’s nominated trustee, taking up the role in February 2021. Ms Harris, who stepped down from her post as the network’s director in late 2020, made the nomination, which was endorsed by the incoming SCAN Director Moira Jeffrey and accepted enthusiastically by the trustees.

Ms Nicolson has been actively involved in the visual arts for more than 20 years and has worked with cultural organisations in Scotland, Ireland, England and Australia. Since graduating from Edinburgh College of Art the diverse range of her work is remarkable; from delivering large-scale commissions, exhibitions and music and performance programmes to completing an MA in the Educational Role of Museums and founding the award-winning ATLAS Arts based on the Isle of Skye. Most recently she launched Climate House at RGBE and formed a collaboration with the Serpentine Galleries as well as embarking on PhD at the University of Dundee. Her previous board experience includes the Centre for Contemporary Arts (Glasgow) and the Scottish Contemporary Art Network.

On her appointment as trustee for the organisation, Emma Nicolson commented: “I am thrilled to be joining the Board of CCS at this time and to contribute the voice of the visual arts community in Scotland to their work. Since 2011 Creative Carbon Scotland has been leading the way in helping cultural institutions address issues around sustainable futures, climate change and climate justice in Scotland. Now more than ever we need to recognise the important role the arts have to play in aiding the culture shift required to reach a zero–carbon, climate–changed world. I look forward to contributing to its future.”

Creative Carbon Scotland director, Ben Twist, said: “It’s a real privilege to have someone of Emma’s calibre joining our excellent Board of Trustees. With her wealth of creative knowledge and experience as well as her commitment to confronting the pressures and challenges of the climate crisis, we all look forward to working with her. Her perspective from the contemporary visual arts world will be invaluable in helping us to achieve our strategic goals.” 

 “We wish Clare Harris all the very best for the future and thank her for valuable contributions to the cultural and strategic direction of Creative Carbon Scotland since 2019.”

Find out more about the work of SCAN and RGBE.

The post Emma Nicolson joins the Creative Carbon Scotland board appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Blog: carbon management update 2019-20

A carbon management reporting and planning update for 2019-20 and how we are mastering the data with the help of PowerBI.

Throughout 2020, I supported Creative Scotland RFOs and organisations receiving cultural funding from City of Edinburgh Council with their emissions reporting and carbon management. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions, it’s been a really challenging time for cultural organisations as everyone has had to adapt personally and professionally in a continually changing landscape. Nonetheless, to date 118 organisations have provided a carbon management plan and 111 Creative Scotland RFOs have reported their emissions. Considering the circumstances, this is very impressive and it points to ongoing engagement among the cultural sector in addressing the climate emergency.

Mastering the data

We were very lucky to host Iain Phillips, an MSc Data Analytics student at Glasgow Caledonian University for a work placement in which he introduced Power BI as a platform to work with the data we’ve gathered since organisations first reported their emissions on a voluntary basis in 2014-15. Together, we were able to bring the whole data set together to produce organisation-specific visualisations and observe wider trends.

colourful pie chart showing kilograms of carbon dioxide emissions by type. For example gas, electricity, landfill, water etc.

Thanks to this work we can share data that provides an overview of what proportion of emissions come from which sources for the whole of 2019-20:

chart showing relative difference in carbon emissions reductions since 2016

We can observe a reduction trend over the years as organisations have developed and implemented carbon management plans, although again remember that we received slightly less emissions reports for 2019-20 than the previous year:

Within the emissions reported over the past five years, those from utilities have reduced substantially as venue-based organisations have tackled lightingventilation and heating with infrastructural changes. At the same time, we’ve seen a reduction in the emissions associated with electricity consumption through more renewables feeding into the National Grid. You’ll note that waste remains a small portion of the overall cultural footprint, although it can’t be overstated in terms of its visibility to staff, artists and audiences, and environmental issues relating to waste that go beyond carbon emissions. As a portion of the cultural footprint, travel emissions remain stubborn both quantitatively and qualitatively, and travel is the central challenge for many organisations.

chart showing emissions by categories of travel, utilities and waste by organisation type

The following breakdown, which is based on the data for 2019-20, provides a snapshot of how the different emissions sources play out for each organisation type. On the whole, theatres are likely to see a large proportion of their emissions relating to their utilities consumption, whereas for tenant organisations a larger proportion is likely to relate to their travel.

The word cloud at the top shows the kinds of projects included in carbon management plans. Encouragingly, travel features large!

Carbon management planning in tricky times

As might be expected, many organisations were unable to deliver the activities they had planned in their previous carbon management plans, but the majority considered how changes to their programme would impact their emissions and a good number were able to build capacity for their future action on climate change through the following themes:

  • Using temporary closures of venues to better understand the baseline energy demand of building systems, allowing for a clearer picture of how this could be optimised when reopening
  • Engaging with strategic and policy development in environmental sustainability
  • Working with other organisations with shared concerns and plan to tackle more complex issues together; we particularly saw this in the launch of the Sculpture Placement Group’s Circular Arts Network and the coming together of the Scottish Classical Sustainability Group
  • Learning from the adaptations made in response to pandemic restrictions. In some cases an increase in digital activities and content reached wider audiences in a way that can outlast current restrictions. For others, travel restrictions triggered a sharpened focus on more local engagement and audiences in a way that similarly can outlast current restrictions and reduce the carbon intensity of some travel.

Through the carbon management plans in place since 2018, organisations estimate that they’ve saved a total of 878 tonnes CO2e in 2018 and 2019. That’s a good start. On one hand it’s larger than any individual organisation’s annual footprint but, since the savings took place over two years, it’s less than the 10% annual reduction that we collectively need to move towards Scotland’s emissions reduction target of Net Zero by 2045.

In December 2020, the UK Government published the Sixth Carbon Budget and the Energy White Paper, with the Scottish Government following up with a refreshed Climate Plan and this year, Glasgow looks forward to hosting the COP26 global climate negotiations this autumn. As we all move forward, we need to ensure our carbon reduction ambitions align with national and international targets and work together to think about how this intersects with our wider engagement and influence in artistic programming and environmental advocacy.

Continuing support and updated Tenant Energy Toolbox

2021 is a big year for many reasons, and we at Creative Carbon Scotland are on hand to support cultural organisations that are interested in learning more about their emissions and how to reduce them. In the first instance, please refer to our carbon management web pages, in particular our tools and resources page. This includes a 20-minute video tutorial providing an introduction to carbon management, our newly updated Tenant Energy Toolbox, which now includes advice on how to monitor emissions when working from home, and more.

by Caro Overy, carbon management planning officer

The post Blog: carbon management update 2019-20 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Call for submissions to the Glasgow Goes Green Festival e-zine

Connections: People, Nature and Power

The Glasgow Goes Green Festival is brought to you by UofGGSAGCU and Strathclydeuniversities! We are all so excited to get started, and would love for you to get involved! Things are, of course, going to work a little differently this year – our usual physical gathering just won’t be possible. However, we are confident that our alternative format – a collaborative e-zine – will be equally effective and thought-provoking.

This year, our theme is Connections: People, Nature and Power. It is deliberately very open because we want to hear from everyone!

Potential topics could include teachings of the city’s COVID-19 response for the climate movement, the community’s preparations for COP26 or the role of nature-based solutions in Glasgow. Submissions can come in a range of formats – prose, artwork, music, videos, podcasts. Additionally, feel free to add in ‘How to get involved’ sections to your submissions to promote longer-term engagement with your work.

We hope this will be a space to reflect on the current socio-environmental circumstances and what feels important to you, or your organisation, at this time.

The deadline for submissions is March 31st. Pieces will be selected, and you will be contacted with the outcome on 7th April, with the online zine publication date in May 2021.

Please follow this link to access the submission form.

We ask that if possible, you use WeTransfer to upload a link to your submission, otherwise the form will fill up quickly with the data required for attachments.

If you have any questions or difficulties submitting your work, please don’t hesitate to get in touch by email: amy.stevenson@glasgow.ac.uk

The post Opportunity: Call for submissions to the Glasgow Goes Green Festival e-zine appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Twist’s Shift #2

Twist’s Shift is a new strand of semi-blog, less formal and structured than Ben’s Strategy Blogs, more a rag-bag of thoughts and experiences from the last wee while.

It’s taken a little while to publish a second edition but, as for the previous edition, I hope there is something of interest for readers from both the arts/cultural end of things and the climate change side.

Talks and workshops

Despite – or perhaps because of – both the pandemic and the looming Brexit, the last few months of 2020 seemed to be full of requests for me to give talks on various topics at conferences in Europe. Or maybe it is due to the forthcoming COP. Here’s a rundown of a few notable events.

In October I was asked to be part of a panel discussion during a longer workshop being run for Creative Ireland, ‘a five-year Programme which connects people, creativity and wellbeing…. We are an all-of-government culture and wellbeing programme that inspires and transforms people, places and communities through creativity.’ The programme runs sort of parallel to, rather than part of, the Arts Council of Ireland (I think this has caused some controversy) and interestingly is funded (at least partly) through the Department of Environment, Climate Policy and Communications (my italics). Behind this workshop – which was aimed at an invited audience of policymakers etc. – was a report on Engaging the Public on Climate Change through the Cultural and Creative Sectors, which was published in 2019. This explores what might be termed an ‘instrumental’ use of the arts, although I personally find the instrumental/intrinsic argument old hat and a distraction. Most art historically has been produced ‘for’ some reason, often religion- or patronage-related, and much of it has been terrific; and there is no requirement on artists to work on climate change, although cultural organisations that take public money might reasonably be required to provide some social as well as cultural goods. However, I do accept that there might be a question of degree: it is important that some art and artists should simply be about making wonderful things, experiences etc.

Who’s at the table?

The interesting thing about the longer workshop was not so much what was said, although it was all good and useful stuff, but who was involved. There was a panel discussion with some arts officers and others with experience of running what I would say were quite traditional environmental art projects. But there was also a short film of an interview with Jenny White, who is the former head of the visual arts programme at the British Council and led on climate change there: an organisation which for some time was reluctant to make public statements, at least about the topic. Most striking perhaps were a welcome and introduction from the director of Creative Ireland and addresses by two government ministers – Eamon Ryan TD, Minister for Environment, Climate Change and Communications, and Catherine Martin TD, Minister for Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media (and Deputy Leader of the Green Party – a reminder of what a good coalition government can make happen…). And here we not only saw these two departments working together, in a way which in my experience is unusual; there was also an announcement about a programme with significant funds for Creative Engagement on Climate Change, run jointly by Creative Ireland and the Department of Environment and Climate and Communications. I understand the fund will launch in February. This builds on a commitment in the relatively new coalition’s Programme for Government to ‘Support Creative Ireland in their ‘Engaging the Public on Climate Change through the Cultural and Creative Sectors’ initiative.’1 An example for Scotland?

Building-in sustainability

In November, I was invited to be on a panel at the European Theatre Forum 2020: European Performing Arts in Focus on ‘Embedding Environmental Sustainability in the theatre and performing arts sector’. Our panel looked at how to get sustainability built into strategic and funding mechanisms in European theatre. Again, this wasn’t so much extraordinary for what was said as for the fact that it was happening at all. The three-day conference sought to provide a European representation for the entire sector as one of Europe’s major art forms, within and outside Europe, and its focus was the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the performing arts and perspectives for the sector. Nonetheless, the whole of the second day was focused on climate change and environmental sustainability. Meanwhile, my colleague Catriona Patterson was (slightly confusingly) asked to give a talk at the more or less simultaneous European Theatre Convention on a similar topic but with a more practical focus. I don’t think that in previous years the European theatre sector has focused as much on climate change.

What’s more, in early December I helped shape and participated in the joint Satellite Meeting of the Informal European Theatre Meeting (IETM) in collaboration with Theatre Forum (the Irish version of the Federation of Scottish Theatre), which nominally took place in Galway, with the participation of the Galway 2020 City of Culture programme. The programme focused on environmental sustainability and climate change, with speakers including Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland and UN Special Envoy on Climate Change, the environmental and indigenous people’s activist Hindou Oumarou Ibrham, and the artistic directors of Druid Theatre Companyand Branar, two very different companies based in Galway (who it turned out had never met…).

In my session I asked Catriona Fallon, who runs the Green Arts Initiative Ireland, and Gwen Sharp of The Green Room, an organisation working on social and environmental sustainability in the music industry in France, to discuss how they were seeking to bring about change strategically, rather than on a piecemeal basis. We talked about the need to challenge our business-as-usual approach to cultural production to enable organisations at all levels, from funders to companies, to facilitate ways of funding, making, performing and touring work that are good for artists, audiences and the planet – and we acknowledged how difficult this is! Later, I listened and contributed to a terrific discussion with embedded artists Maeve Stone and Anyuta Wiazemsky Snauwaert about their work on the Creative Europe project that Creative Carbon Scotland is leading, Cultural Adaptations. Our forthcoming Cultural Adaptations conference in early March will feature contributions from all of these people and Tania Banotti, director of Creative Ireland.

There was a lot more at the Galway meeting than at the other events that was new and inspiring and again its very strong focus on climate change was striking. We have been working with Theatre Forum for a while now, which has led to the Green Arts Initiative Ireland; IETM has been increasing its work on climate change but this was by far its most ambitious and focused engagement with the subject. The audience – admittedly self-selecting – was enthusiastic and interested, albeit at very different stages of the journey. It demonstrated how the UK is possibly the European country working most coherently in climate change and the performing arts, at least, with Creative Carbon Scotland and Julie’s Bicycle (in England) working closely with their respective funding organisations and sectors. But clearly Ireland is on the move…  I wrote some preliminary notes for the Satellite Meeting participants, aiming to cover all levels of awareness.

Arts and globalisation

Finally, also in December, I delivered the keynote speech ‘in’ Lisbon for a conference organised by OPART (Organismo de Producao Artistica) entitled Navegar é preciso? Sentidos para a internacionalização da dança (my translation: ‘Is travelling necessary? Directions for the Internationalisation of Dance’). Navegar actually means (I think) ‘sailing’ or ‘to sail’, and by luck or someone else’s judgement this resonated with my talk, which started with a discussion about how the humble shipping container had been partially responsible for the globalisation of international trade, and that performing artists and the arts were just as affected by globalisation as the textile or any other manufacturing industry. This has many advantages: the possibility of more work far and wide and the chance to work with new collaborators; and for audiences and promoters a greater choice of work. But equally it has its downsides: competition for what work or performance slots are available from competitors far and wide. And international travel has implications for artists’ health, equalities (people with disabilities or caring responsibilities may find it harder to do) and possibly the nature of the work, which may end up being produced for an ‘international’ audience rather than rooted in a place as, for me, the best theatre is.

The Lisbon talk had originally been scheduled for March but was postponed due to the pandemic, which has been exacerbated by speedy international travel: the worst-hit countries are those with the most connections and permeability, whilst those which have managed the disease have done so by severely restricting incoming visitors. I argued in my talk for a radical localism and maybe a willingness to recognise that complete freedom to travel for all wasn’t ideal. Instead I wondered whether one way forward might be to consider a few slow, sustainable and extended trips in a lifetime, perhaps especially for the unburdened young, enabling learning and development, backed up with reports both from travellers and people actually living in other places. I pointed out that Shakespeare seldom if ever travelled beyond England but managed to imagine a much wider world in some very fine plays. This would be the bedrock of a long and sustainable artistic career, avoiding parochialism, nationalism and building a strong relationship with a local audience.

Confirmation

All these events and the requests to speak confirm what we’ve noticed in Creative Carbon Scotland over the last year: a great deal more interest in what we do. The pandemic has focused people’s attention on unexpected threats and new ways of working, and the forthcoming COP in Glasgow is concentrating minds. The EU is actively incorporating climate change into programmes such as Creative Europe, which is encouraging various European cultural networks to interrogate their ways of working, and consequently assumptions about international travel are changing. And maybe our own persistence – Creative Carbon Scotland will be 10 years old this year! – is beginning to pay off and people are catching on to the idea that what we’ve been talking about is mainstream, not crackpot. I’m a long-term pessimist but a short-term optimist and I’m looking forward to a positive, interesting and busy 2021.

by Ben Twist, director of Creative Carbon Scotland

The post Twist’s Shift #2 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: rad2021 traineeship applications

rad is a paid eight-month traineeship with a Scottish independent TV production company.

rad is a fantastic opportunity for anyone who would love to work in television but hasn’t been able to find a way in or has faced a barrier to entry. Whether that barrier has been through race, disability or economic background, rad was created to dissolve those barriers.

It’s time to forget the “who you know” rule, we want to know you!

What’s more, our host production companies are dedicated to supporting you throughout the programme. You’ll also have team TRC on hand to support you throughout the whole experience, we will be there to steer you through.

The deadline for applications is Friday 19th February. 

For further information please visit the website.

rad is a paid eight-month traineeship with a Scottish independent TV production company.

rad is a fantastic opportunity for anyone who would love to work in television but hasn’t been able to find a way in or has faced a barrier to entry. Whether that barrier has been through race, disability or economic background, rad was created to dissolve those barriers.

It’s time to forget the “who you know” rule, we want to know you!

What’s more, our host production companies are dedicated to supporting you throughout the programme. You’ll also have team TRC on hand to support you throughout the whole experience, we will be there to steer you through.

The deadline for applications is Friday 19th February. 

For further information please visit the website.

If you require support to complete the application process we are more than happy to help, just get in contact.

The post Opportunity: rad2021 traineeship applications appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Co-organise a Green Tease event with us

Since 2013 Green Tease has provided a platform for those interested in teasing out the links between the arts, climate change and environmental sustainability through the exchange of ideas, knowledge and practices. 

We are currently looking for ideas for creative events connecting the arts and environmentalism to be run as part of the Green Tease events programme across April 2021-March 2022. These events would be micro-funded by and organised in collaboration with us, Creative Carbon Scotland.   

These events should be free, open to people from both arts and environment backgrounds, and as accessible and environmentally sustainable as possible in design. We do not usually support events that are primarily of use only to artists or only to sustainability practitioners; these are also useful, but they just are not the focus of Green Tease. Have a read through our events archive and Green Tease reflection blogs to find out more about past events.

We welcome creative and non-standard approaches and formats. We have a particular interest in addressing issues of climate justice, but there are no restrictions on theme or subject matter so long as it is relevant to our audiences. Events should be accessible and inclusive; our expectations here are laid out in our Safe Working Spaces Statement

We will work with you in collaboration to organise the event. Although there is some budget attached, this is primarily an opportunity to work with us rather than a funding opportunity

About the Collaboration

What we are looking for from you: 

  • An idea 
  • Your skills and expertise 

And what we are offering: 

  • Our experience organising events 
  • Technical and administrative support 
  • Audiences and publicity channels 
  • Feedback and evaluation 

 We can also contribute on average £400 to the budget for each event, which could be used to cover: 

  • Event hire 
  • Materials 
  • Catering 
  • Speaker fees 
  • If you are a freelancer or not currently employed, the budget can also be used to cover time you spend working on the event 

Events should be compatible with COVID-19 safety regulation. This may involve: 

  • Events run entirely online 
  • Events with options for in-person or digital participation 
  • Events held outdoors 
  • Events planned to adjust at short notice to a changing context 
How to Apply

Please submit your application through the following form by 1st March 2021 and we will get back in touch by 15th March 2021. We will choose our favourite proposals based on the following selection criteria: 

  • What expertise would you bring? 
  • Is the idea strong, relevant, innovative, or different from what we have done before? 
  • How realistic is the idea, based on budget and time constraints? 
  • Have accessibility and sustainability considerations been carefully considered? 
  • Does the proposal fit with our aims as an organisation? 
  • Can we add value by being involved? 

We particularly welcome applications from ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, people from working class backgrounds and any others who may face barriers to involvement in the arts or environmentalism.  

We will choose up to five ideas to work with but may choose less. We will provide feedback to anyone whose idea is not chosen. If we choose to work with you, we will set up an online meeting to discuss things with you and talk through how we can work together. If you have any questions, please email lewis.coenen-rowe@creativecarbonscotland.com.  

Creative Carbon Scotland will only use the information you provide to contact you about the Green Tease Call for Collaborators and for records directly relevant to this project. Information will be stored securely and will not be shared with any third parties.

APPLY HERE

(Top photo: Images from 4 previous Green Tease events: A group in conversation, people standing in a field, an audience listening to a speaker, a group writing and drawing together. Text reads: Green Tease Call for Collaborators: Work with us to create an event connecting the arts and environmental sustainability.)

The post Opportunity: Co-organise a Green Tease event with us appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity – Artist outreach: sustainable art exhibition

We are looking for sustainable, eco-conscious artists for our online exhibition.

We are a brand new, eco-conscious art gallery, committed to harnessing the influential power of art as a tool to create positive change.

We are currently looking for artists to take part in our first-ever online exhibition in support of Plastic Oceans UK, selling and promoting the work of emerging and semi-established artists who use sustainable alternatives in their practice. This can include upcycling, recycling, and experimenting with less-polluting methods to create their artworks, to raise environmental awareness & help encourage a different mindset towards ‘waste’ materials in the art world and beyond.

These artworks will also be promoted through our Instagram page.

We will donate 10% of our profits to Plastic Oceans UK to help put an end to plastic pollution for good.

Register your interest via our website.

If you are interested or if you have any questions, please get in touch.

The post Opportunity – Artist outreach: sustainable art exhibition appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Tiny plays for a brighter future

A 600-word tiny play challenge from Fishamble & ESB about what a brighter energy future means to you.

​ESB has joined forces with Fishamble: The New Play Company to set a challenge for the Irish public, and anyone who feels they have a 600-word play in them, to capture what a brighter future means for people living in communities across Ireland.

For ESB, a brighter future starts with a low carbon future, powered by clean electricity. One where air quality is better, energy is sustainable and affordable, communities are thriving and where the future of the planet is safe. With Ireland’s electricity system on a pathway to be carbon free within a generation, and with the growing adoption of electric cars, electric heat pumps and smart home devices, electricity will be a transformative force in the fight against climate change.

Tiny plays for a brighter future is an opportunity to give creative expression to all points of view in the transition to a low carbon energy future: to look at the choices we all must make to meet our future climate goals, examine how those choices will impact communities across Ireland, and imagine what we want the Ireland of our future to be, through 600-word tiny plays.

Submissions deadline is 5pm Irish Time, Monday 1st March 2021.

A maximum of two entries per person can be submitted.

​Writers of shortlisted entries will be paid €200 each to have their plays published online, and three chosen writers will be paid a further commissioning fee of €800 (so a total of €1,000) to have their play brought to life by Fishamble, who will produce and film multimedia pieces that will be shared online.

This call-out is open to all residents on the island of Ireland, and Irish abroad (with the exception of Fishamble & ESB staff). In all of its work, Fishamble seeks to tell the story of Ireland, and to engage with a wide range of communities, through discovering, developing and producing plays by Irish writers, and writers living on the island of Ireland. It aims to reflect contemporary Ireland through bringing a diverse range of voices to the stage, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, civil or family status, religion, age, or socio-economic background.

Fishamble actively encourages submissions from underrepresented and marginalised voices including, but not limited to, people who identify as: BIPOC, members of the traveller community, neurodivergent people, LGBTQI+ , migrants, and people with disabilities. People of all ages can send in their 600-word tiny play.

The post Opportunity: Tiny plays for a brighter future appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Book your ticket for the Cultural Adaptations conference

Tickets for the Cultural Adaptations conference, taking place online from 2nd to 5th March 2021, are now available to book!

The conference marks the conclusion of Cultural Adaptations: an action research project supported by the Creative Europe programme of the European Union and co-funded by the Scottish Government.

Book your ticket today!

How must our culture adapt to the impacts of climate change? And how can culture and creativity help create a positive future?

These are the questions we, along with our European project partners in Ireland, Sweden and Belgium, have been endeavouring to answer throughout the Cultural Adaptations project using creative processes, including embedded artist projects. Now, we are delighted to share this learning and the online toolkits we have produced, which will be available to support people undertaking adaptation within their organisation or city region.

Over four afternoons, the conference will showcase some of the unique, innovative and creative approaches to solving complex climate challenges we have employed, present new ways of working collaboratively in adaptation, and bring together a diverse and ambitious group of adaptation practitioners, city officials, cultural organisations and artists from across Europe and the UK.

There will be speakers from Scotland, Europe and around the world and programme activities include keynote presentationspanel discussions and interactive networking sessions.

Bookings are now open, with prices from £0 to £45 so that as many people as possible can attend what promises to be an inspiring and thought-provoking four-day event.

We look forwarding to seeing a broad range of artists and creative practitionerscultural managerssustainability and adaptation professionalspolicymakers from local and national government, and academics and students in attendance.

The post Book your ticket for the Cultural Adaptations conference appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico