Climate Art: Process or Product?

By Peterson Toscano

Returning to the Art House is Jennie Carlisle, curator and director of the Smith Gallery at Appalachian State University, along with Laura England, senior lecturer in sustainable development. Jennie and Laura are two of three co-facilitators of ASU’s Climate Stories Collaborative. Both appeared in Episode 49 of the Art House and told us how, in the spring of 2020, they quickly adapted to the COVID global pandemic by putting their annual Student Climate Stories Showcase on Instagram

Some climate leaders see art as a straightforward communication tool. But art overloaded with messages about issues and politics can turn out clunky and preachy. How does an artist stay in a creative space? When producing climate art, what is more important – the process or the product?

Next month: Song leaders Annie Patterson and Peter Blood are liberal Quakers in New England who have been leading singing for over 30 years. They talk about the songs that motivate and inspire climate advocates.

If you like what you hear, you can listen to full episodes of Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher Radio, Spotify, SoundCloudPodbeanNorthern Spirit RadioGoogle PlayPlayerFM, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

This article is part of The Art House series.

______________________________

As host of Citizens’ Climate Radio, Peterson Toscano regularly features artists who address climate change in their work. The Art House section of his program includes singer/songwriters, visual artists, comics, creative writers, and playwrights. Through a collaboration with Artists and Climate Change and Citizens’ Climate Education, each month Peterson reissues The Art House for this blog. If you have an idea for The Art House, contact Peterson: radio @ citizensclimatelobby.org

———-

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Powered by WPeMatico

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: